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Haman

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NEWS
March 24, 1986 | By JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writer
The Rev. Kenneth Haman is a preacher by vocation and an actor by avocation. Haman, the pastor of Rehoboth United Methodist Church in Frankford, has been parlaying his unusual combination of talents Sunday mornings to spread the gospel - and keep his audience awake. Since the first Sunday of Lent, Feb. 16, he has been bringing the Scriptures to life by coming down from the pulpit and acting out the roles of biblical characters. He's portrayed Pontius Pilate, King Herod, the high priest Caiphas, the apostle Peter, the betrayer Judas.
NEWS
March 12, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / ERIC MENCHER
David Levin is at the head of a parade marking the Jewish holiday of Purim. The parade began at Rittenhouse Square and ended at the Gershman Y at Broad and Pine Streets. The holiday commemorates the deliverance of the Jews from the massacre plotted by Haman.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | By Betsey Hansell, Special to The Inquirer
Costumed merrymakers stomped vigorously on a life-size drawing of wicked Haman. Tiny queen Esthers with glittery crowns tripped on their trailing gowns. Old folks schmoozed over kosher hot dogs and complained that chocolate chips will never replace the traditional prune filling in the homentashen cookies shaped like Haman's tricorn hat. Sunday's festivities were a lot like every Purim carnival in Congregation Beth El's 39-year history, but there was an edge this year. It came only days after news of a possible end to the Persian Gulf war, which was heavy on everyone's mind.
NEWS
March 25, 1986 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
And in every province, and in every city . . . the Jews had gladness and joy, a feast and a good day. - The Book of Esther It is a 2,300-year-old story of one man's hatred of the Jews, of his lottery to pick the day of their annihilation, of a heroic queen's courage and of the salvation of her people. It is the story behind the Jewish holiday of Purim, which began last evening and concludes today. The holiday is one of joy and celebration, of feasting and drinking and charity.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | By Diana Cercone Harris, Special to The Inquirer
At the door, dollar bills were converted into shekels. For three shekels (in play money), you could have your fortune told. Two shekels bought a chance at "The Wheel of Esther" or a toss of "Mordecai's Rings. " Business was brisk as children and grown-ups gladly plunked down their money. On Sunday, the auditorium of Congregation Beth El in Fallsington was transformed into a land of chance and revelry where more than 400 synagogue members and visitors celebrated the festival of Purim.
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the platform, a gray-haired man dressed in prayer shawl and yarmulke solemnly chanted the words of Scripture in Hebrew. Down among the congregation, just yards from this dignified scene, a small riot seemed to be breaking out. The racket sounded like a cross between Times Square at the stroke of the New Year and Veterans' Stadium after a Jaworski pass interception. Metal noisemakers rattled like a graveyard full of skeletons, whistles erupted row to row, and dozens of young voices reached down to their lowest register for a loud chorus of derision: "Boooooooooo!"
NEWS
March 8, 1987 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Residents will get the chance to sample some hamantashen, win a prize in a Shushan chariot race or "punch Haman in the eye" at the annual Purim carnival from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. next Sunday at the Jewish Community Center on Route 70 in Cherry Hill. A concert of Jewish music that same evening also will be part of the Purim celebration. According to Martha Karasick, director of adult activities and cultural events at the center, Purim celebrates the rescue of the Jews from a plot to kill them in Persia: Haman, an aide to the king of Persia who lived in the city of Shushan, ordered all the people to bow down to him. Mordecai, a Jew, refused to do so, and an angry Haman plotted to kill all the Jews in Persia.
NEWS
March 1, 1999 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Tonight is Purim, a dress-up and party-time festival that's as close as the Jewish community ever gets to Mardi Gras. In Philadelphia and other centers of American Jewish life, the celebration focuses on the synagogue. Carnivals and costume contests were the rule at Hebrew schools yesterday in preparation for the holiday, which the rabbis view as a religiously minor occasion. Purim is not always a synagogue show. Four Jewish organizations sponsored a Purim party at the Philadelphia Zoo yesterday, and the Lubavitchers, a Hasidic outreach group, plan a parade to start at the Liberty Bell at sundown tonight.
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NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not every day that members of Temple Emanuel get to see their rabbi dressed as a Major League Baseball player or their cantor as Mr. Incredible from the movie The Incredibles . Yet that's what happened Sunday as the Cherry Hill synagogue hosted a superhero-theme talent show to celebrate Purim, the Jewish holiday that observes the bravery of the people who saved the Jews in the fifth century B.C.E. from Haman, the vindictive prime minister of Persia. Children performed dance routines, put on a puppet show featuring Kermit the Frog, and sang a Taylor Swift song.
NEWS
January 20, 2002 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Some exhibitions establish a whole set of values before a single word is spoken. A display of that sort by Andras Borocz, emphasizing stark, emblematic wooden sculptures out of which the detail throbs, is featured at Temple Judea Museum. This work by a Hungarian-born New Yorker who often exhibits in that city and abroad is displayed together with photos by Jordan Cassway of Philadelphia, who grew up in Wyncote. Borocz's particular thematic material related to the forthcoming Feast of Purim shies away from the standard stock of images associated with any seasonal religious observance.
NEWS
March 21, 2000 | STEVEN M. FALK / DAILY NEWS
In her clown costume, Leah Meadvia, 9, of Elkins Park, celebrates Purim, the most joyous Jewish holiday of the year, at Congregation Bnai Abraham in Center City, while Rabbi Menachem Schmidt says the evening prayer. Purim celebrates the rescue of the Jews by Esther from a plot by Haman, an aide to the Persian king, to massacre them, 2,300 years ago. Purim, also known as the Feast of Lots, began at sunset. There was a parade from Rittenhouse Square to the synagogue, where a fun-filled Purim marathon was planned.
NEWS
March 20, 2000 | By Kate Herman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Solemn services and typically reserved behavior were abandoned in favor of brightly colored costumes and merry noisemakers yesterday as members of Congregation B'nai Jacob gathered to celebrate Purim, the holiday that celebrates the liberation of the Jews, which begins today at sundown. Festive music filled a large room strewn with streamers and balloons, with game tables lining the walls and the aroma of kosher hot dogs wafting through the air. Children in costumes such as princesses, Valley Girls and Star Wars characters raced from game to game, collecting prizes along the way and depositing their winnings on tables nearby.
NEWS
March 1, 1999 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
Tonight is Purim, a dress-up and party-time festival that's as close as the Jewish community ever gets to Mardi Gras. In Philadelphia and other centers of American Jewish life, the celebration focuses on the synagogue. Carnivals and costume contests were the rule at Hebrew schools yesterday in preparation for the holiday, which the rabbis view as a religiously minor occasion. Purim is not always a synagogue show. Four Jewish organizations sponsored a Purim party at the Philadelphia Zoo yesterday, and the Lubavitchers, a Hasidic outreach group, plan a parade to start at the Liberty Bell at sundown tonight.
NEWS
March 1, 1999 | By Angela Galloway, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Hazy skies and constant rain made for a dreary morning, but it didn't dampen people's spirits at an indoor carnival as dozens of costume-clad children played in a colorfully decorated synagogue yesterday. Parents in tow, the children traipsed from booth to booth at Congregation B'nai Jacob's festivity, a prelude to the Jewish holiday of Purim, which starts at sundown tonight. "It's literally the most joyous day in the entire Jewish calendar," Rabbi David Mayer said. "It's the one day when the [Jewish community really]
NEWS
March 12, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / ERIC MENCHER
David Levin is at the head of a parade marking the Jewish holiday of Purim. The parade began at Rittenhouse Square and ended at the Gershman Y at Broad and Pine Streets. The holiday commemorates the deliverance of the Jews from the massacre plotted by Haman.
FOOD
March 4, 1998 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Sue Roseman owes her career, in part, to events that took place almost 2,500 years ago in ancient Persia. That's when Purim began. This year it falls on March 12. There are exchanges of gifts among family and gifts to the poor, and singing, entertainment and merrymaking. Children dress in costumes and masks depicting biblical characters from the Book of Esther. It's a tale with all the necessary elements - deceit and intrigue, courage and pride, a beautiful heroine and an evil villain.
NEWS
March 24, 1997 | By Lisa Sandberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's known as the merriest festival of the Jewish calendar, a time of colorful children's costumes, candy and cake giving, and humorous skits depicting the story of the Jewish victory over the evil Haman in ancient Persia. At yesterday's celebration of Purim at the Kaiserman Branch of the Jewish Community Center, 100 parents and costumed kids gathered. Tyke-sized Queen Esthers marveled at the speckled costumes of other Queen Esthers, parents munched on the fruit-filled hamantaschen cakes shaped like Haman's three-cornered hat, and older folks listened intently during a reading from the megillah, or scroll, containing the biblical Book of Esther.
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