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Handicapped People

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NEWS
December 12, 1990 | By Jeremy Kalmanofsky, Special to The Inquirer
Cherry Hill agreed last week to take measures to improve access for handicapped people at 14 township parks, thereby averting a court hearing planned for today on whether recent renovations at the parks had violated state law. The agreement closes a year of sometimes bitter disagreement on the matter, which began when Mindy Rosen, a Cherry Hill resident whose son is disabled, complained to the state that the $470,000, two-year renovation project...
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | By Neal Thompson, Special to The Inquirer
Tired of the same old unfulfilling summer by the pool or the beach? The Citizen Advocacy Program of Mount Holly, which is sponsored by the New Jersey Association for Retarded Citizens, suggests volunteer work for the summer for anyone 18 years or older. The program's coordinator, Deborah Fitzgerald, said volunteers will work one-to-one with individuals suffering from some form of cerebral palsy, epilepsy and/or mental retardation. "A lot of these people are discriminated against and they just need somebody there to ensure their rights and to protect their interests and needs," said Fitzgerald.
NEWS
July 16, 1987 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
The future use of a house on Ladomus Avenue occupied by two handicapped people is causing a stir in Ridley Park. Residents of the first block of Riverview Avenue, which parallels Ladomus, said at Tuesday night's council meeting that they were worried that the property, owned by an organization that finds housing for people with handicaps, would evolve into a group home. They said that the grass on the property had not been cut since the occupants moved in, about three weeks ago, and that trash was not put out for collection during their first two weeks of occupancy.
NEWS
October 26, 1997 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Most parks don't have a motto, but if the newly opened Pioneer Park had one, it might be "Don't Give Up. " After the community service committee of the Burlington County Association of Realtors decided the group would build a playground accessible to handicapped people, "even a lot of our members said it couldn't be done," said Sam Moore, a committee member. Five years and more than $50,000 later, Pioneer Park opened Wednesday on the grounds of the county Special Services School District's Westampton campus.
NEWS
December 20, 1990 | By Richard Kleiman, Special to The Inquirer
Chuck Hallgren and his family live in East Fallowfield, south of Coatesville - away from most forms of public transportation, away from stores and offices. His two sons, Jason, 17, and Christian, 15, have muscular dystrophy and must use wheelchairs. A few years ago, his wife, Susan, lost the use of her right side and often also must use a wheelchair. His 11-year-old daughter, Heather, is in good health. Hallgren is the only family member able to drive. "If you can get yourself down to West Chester, you can pick up SEPTA, and you can get down to 69th Street (in Upper Darby)
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | By Bridget Mount, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The one of the fastest quadriplegic swimmers in the United States can now spend most of her time in the Springfield Country Club pool, instead of getting in and out of it. Mildred Giovanni, of Yeadon, who has backstroked in competitions all over the world, and was named the fastest quadriplegic swimmer in the country last year. She trains at the outdoor Springfield pool, which installed a chairlift for handicapped people this summer. The hydraulic chair allows her to get into the water easily, she said.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Ilya I. Zaslavsky's otherwise bare wooden desk in a laboratory of the Moscow Textile Institute lay his fan mail: Letters from his new constituents requesting help, and telegrams of congratulations. Some of the telegrams were signed "invalid from childhood. " To those people, Zaslavsky is a hero, a member of the new national legislature who is living proof that a handicapped person - disabled since infancy - can become a vital, important figure in the Soviet Union. But more than that, to them Zaslavsky embodies a fervent hope for a better life.
NEWS
August 19, 2008
I'M WRITING on behalf of all handicapped people who have handicap plates (not placards) on their cars. It is a shame that PennDOT can't screen people with placards, as it seems that anyone and his uncle can get one. Just fill out the form and get someone pretending to be a doctor or police officer to sign it. Send it to PennDOT, get the placard and pass it on to friends or relatives so they can park in handicap areas or get out of the car and...
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
A woman in a wheelchair suggested wheelchair square dancing. A blind man liked the idea of modified fitness classes. The mother of a young woman in a wheelchair said bowling or board games - or just a place to talk - would be nice for teenagers. For more than an hour on Thursday, 35 people brainstormed about offering programs for the "physically challenged" at Lawncrest Recreation Center, 6000 Rising Sun Ave. The proposals were as diverse as the group, which included handicapped people, local businessmen, an Eagle Scout, women's club members, a retirement home representative, a civic association leader and an 88-year-old man. "There are 700 ideas," said Lawncrest Recreation Center supervisor Cathy Maloney-Carchidi, who organized the meeting.
NEWS
June 13, 1987 | By Mark Butler, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Sellitti would have you believe that he went blind after a trip to a local mall: "I was walking around shopping with my family, and I saw this blind guy, and I liked his white cane. I said, 'Boy, that's for me.' " He also would have you believe that, like Rodney Dangerfield, he gets no respect: "My family, they'd describe the food on my dish, and say the meat is at 12 o'clock, the corn is at 3 o'clock and the potatoes are at 6 o'clock. But my brother, he'd spin the dish. I was 14 before I found out that cranberry sauce doesn't have gristle.
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NEWS
January 16, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
COMMON PLEAS Judge M. Teresa Sarmina might want to avoid checking her voice messages for the foreseeable future. The Fraternal Order of Police, District Attorney's Office and the family of fallen Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Boyle yesterday unleashed a torrent of fury in Sarmina's direction as they responded to the judge's recent decision to vacate a death sentence for Boyle's killer, Edward Bracey. In a one-page ruling Friday, Sarmina sided with Bracey's attorneys, who argued that he was mentally retarded - and thus shouldn't be executed, because of a constitutional restriction.
NEWS
August 19, 2008
I'M WRITING on behalf of all handicapped people who have handicap plates (not placards) on their cars. It is a shame that PennDOT can't screen people with placards, as it seems that anyone and his uncle can get one. Just fill out the form and get someone pretending to be a doctor or police officer to sign it. Send it to PennDOT, get the placard and pass it on to friends or relatives so they can park in handicap areas or get out of the car and...
NEWS
August 26, 2002
McGreevey's literacy push falls short An Aug. 2 article, "Governor details his literacy plan," said Gov. McGreevey was making improved literacy rates among third graders a centerpiece of his administration. If that is so, he has some bad information. Various studies have concluded that children who fall behind in first grade have only a one in eight chance of ever catching up. McGreevey should place the emphasis on first grade, where it would do the most good. The governor's initiative also ignores the 2.8 million New Jerseyans above age 16 who are nonreaders or below-level readers.
NEWS
October 26, 1997 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Most parks don't have a motto, but if the newly opened Pioneer Park had one, it might be "Don't Give Up. " After the community service committee of the Burlington County Association of Realtors decided the group would build a playground accessible to handicapped people, "even a lot of our members said it couldn't be done," said Sam Moore, a committee member. Five years and more than $50,000 later, Pioneer Park opened Wednesday on the grounds of the county Special Services School District's Westampton campus.
NEWS
May 8, 1997 | By Gwendolyn Crump, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After weeks of criticism from outraged handicapped people and angry residents, Mayor Thomas DiLauro resigned yesterday following the discovery that he had used a fake handicapped parking sticker. DiLauro did not attend last night's Township Council meeting and refused comment when reached at his home. His letter of resignation was read by Councilman Jim Wujcik, who called DiLauro's resignation both brave and unfortunate. In the letter, DiLauro wrote: "I made an error, but some members of the community could not find it in their hearts to forgive me. " DiLauro, who was elected mayor in 1992, said he endured humiliation and constant hammering from Pamela Reid, director of Resources for Independent Living, a Mount Laurel-based group that moniters handicapped issues.
NEWS
September 23, 1993 | By Lisa E. Anderson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There are two group homes in this township. Directly across the border in Abington, there are two more. That concentration has caused Upper Dublin residents some concern. As a result, the Upper Dublin Board of Commissioners held a special meeting Tuesday to consider an ordinance to amend the township zoning code. The proposed ordinance, which would regulate group homes, is scheduled to be voted on at the commissioners' meeting on Oct. 12. "What (the ordinance) would do is establish some control now, so that in the future, we won't have what we do now," said Board Chairman Richard Rulon.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | By Bridget Mount, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The one of the fastest quadriplegic swimmers in the United States can now spend most of her time in the Springfield Country Club pool, instead of getting in and out of it. Mildred Giovanni, of Yeadon, who has backstroked in competitions all over the world, and was named the fastest quadriplegic swimmer in the country last year. She trains at the outdoor Springfield pool, which installed a chairlift for handicapped people this summer. The hydraulic chair allows her to get into the water easily, she said.
NEWS
November 15, 1992 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When James Cottingham went to borough hall to complain about a restaurant that did not have a ramp for his wheelchair, he encountered a problem: Borough hall did not have a ramp, either. "It's frustrating," Cottingham said of his efforts to get into Oaks Hall, which in the 1920s was the office of Leon Todd, a real estate broker who sold building lots in the lake resort community he was developing. It's also risky, since Cottingham's wheelchair tends to tip over when he tries to bounce it up the two small steps leading into the borough offices.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | by Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
Drowned out by shouts of protest from disabled transit riders, SEPTA's board voted unanimously yesterday for a four-step series of boosts in its ParaTransit fares - 25 cents more each year through 1995. For the first time, the fare increase will require registered handicapped users to pay a premium over regular SEPTA fares for the door-to-door service available through the ParaTransit program. Instead of the one-token ($1.05) or $1.50 cash fares now in effect, ParaTransit will charge one token plus 25 cents, or $1.75 cash, beginning Sept.
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