CollectionsHandouts
IN THE NEWS

Handouts

NEWS
June 11, 1995
Last week, Washington's air was blue with oaths swearing an end to the Energy Department - and vowing a long, hard look at the future of its network of high-tech, high-priced national laboratories. "Like disco dancing, pet rocks and mood rings," said Rep. Todd Tiahrt (R., Kan.), the department created to respond to the 1970s energy crisis had seen its time come and go. He was not, as they say, alone. Energy's demise is at the top of the hit list for the GOP's new turks. Indeed, one charge fueling the drive against the department (and Commerce and Defense, as well)
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you're poor and hungry, you can get a free meal almost any day of the week on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. On Sunday and Monday nights, the volunteer group Food Not Bombs hands out hot dinners. On Monday afternoons, Adam Bruckner, an advocate for the homeless, sets up in front of the Free Library with chicken hot dogs and pasta - his routine for 10 years. There are meals from members of a Korean church, as well as once-a-week rice dinners from an older woman whom everyone calls Mom. The outdoor feedings draw dozens, if not hundreds, of the city's most desperate people.
NEWS
July 19, 2001
MAYBE PRESIDENT BUSH deserves more credit than he usually gets for his management skill. He does seem to be gifted with the ability to make things happen, almost by just wishing them so. During the presidential campaign, for example, amid the longest economic boom in history, he grumbled so much about the bad economy that it finally did manage to falter. And from the first days of his administration, he sounded such dire warning about an "energy crisis" that the country began believing him: before, 3 percent of the population was concerned about an energy crisis; now it's 53 percent.
NEWS
November 17, 1988
Philadelphia is the only city on Amtrak's Northeast corridor that gives riders two options to disembark, but pity the hapless soul who chooses the North Philadelphia Station. The decrepit, stinking, rubble-strewn station, which stands amid a bleak urban wasteland, is every unsuspecting traveler's nightmare. All that's about to change, however. A vigorous public-private partnership has been formed to renovate the station and build a shopping complex around it. The federal, state and city governments will contribute $6 million toward the project, and Kode Development Associates of Philadelphia will spend $8 million.
NEWS
December 10, 2003
OK, as best we can follow it, here's the argument being offered as to why Philadelphia should continue a tax break to 10 hotels that is set to expire: 1) The economy is in the dumper. 2) The Pennsylvania Convention Center, a key filler of hotel rooms, is in the dumper. 3) People still remember 9/11. 4) It's almost Christmas. Of course, hundreds of local businesses could make the same generic pitch for a property tax abatement. But the city cannot afford a tax break for every business - nor can its public schools, which rely heavily on the property tax. City Council should reject this proposal.
NEWS
March 13, 1986 | BY ADRIAN LEE
Wilson Goode's Monday press conference on "where we go from here with MOVE" didn't go anywhere. The Goode Administration is stalled to its hubcaps in a welter of paper. The press conference was lousy with it - announcements of new "crisis management committees," "communications committees," "leadership committees. " There was so much paper that when you picked at a page to get it out of the "Philadelphia, Get to Know Us" press kit, the stuff slid out in hunks and thudded to the floor.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Despite a raucous disruption by Occupy Philadelphia protesters, the city Board of Health approved amended regulations Thursday for groups that feed the homeless outdoors. Groups will be required to obtain a permit from the city and to have at least one member receive free food-safety training from the Health Department. Health Commissioner Donald F. Schwarz said he expected the new rules to be enforced around May 1. The regulations come as the city proceeds with a ban in city parks on feeding the homeless and others who want free meals.
NEWS
July 23, 2009 | By Zoe Tillman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Taking their job search to the street, literally, recent college graduates Sean Christman, 21, and Andrew O'Malley, 22, passed out copies of their resum?s to commuters taking the Benjamin Franklin Bridge into Center City yesterday morning. Dressed in dark suits and ties despite the hot, muggy air, Christman and O'Malley - longtime friends from Haddon Township - paced along the raised median near Eighth and Vine Streets, trying to catch the attention of drivers and passengers stopped at a red light.
NEWS
June 1, 1990
If you're like many people who frequent Center City, you've become so fed up with panhandlers that you rarely give them money anymore. And if we're all being honest here, you also find that you're less and less sympathetic to their plight. Besides the relatively few panhandlers who are persistent, obnoxious and even physically aggressive, there's the fact that homeless advocates tell us most of our spare change winds up at the liquor store or on the city's drug corners - not in providing food, shelter or clothing for the needy.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|