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Handouts

NEWS
June 26, 2011
Tim Chapman is chief operating officer of Heritage Action for America (heritageaction.com), a conservative grassroots advocacy group based in Washington Ford Motor Co. is on to something. This year, hundreds of taxis, powered by compressed natural gas, will pop up around the country: 120 Ford Transit Connects in the Los Angeles area, 70 in Connecticut. Las Vegas, St. Louis, and Philadelphia will also see their own fleet of Transit Connects soon. America's abundant supply of cheap, accessible natural gas and the stubbornly high cost of gasoline and diesel are making natural gas vehicles more attractive and economical.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Watch it! The shambling, rambling wreck headed your way is going to ask you for money. What will you do? You can't escape them. Philadelphia's homeless - drunken, demented or just plain hungry - seem to be everywhere. There are an estimated 1,400 homeless people in the city, about a quarter of them mentally ill, and you can't walk far in some parts of town without having one of them ask you for help. Since you can't avoid them, some strategy must be decided on, and strategy is generally based on a point of view, an attitude.
NEWS
December 1, 1996 | By Stephanie Brenowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The wild waterfowl of this small borough are getting a big dose of tough love: The borough has outlawed feeding the ducks and geese that have made the Paint Works lake their year-round home. "It's for their own good," said Mayor Ed G. Campbell 3d. A new ordinance, requested by the owners of the lake and passed earlier this month, is meant to discourage the well-meaning people who feed the fowl bread crumbs and other snacks in the fall - a situation that has the unfortunate effect of fooling more and more of them into thinking they should spend the winter at the lake.
NEWS
September 7, 2000 | by Boyd K. Rutherford
Now that the political conventions are over, I have had the time to reflect on my experience as a delegate to the Republican National Convention in the great city of Philadelphia. The people of Philadelphia proved to the world that Philadelphia is truly the City of Brotherly Love. From the bus drivers to the folks behind the counter at Jim's on South Street, everyone my fellow delegates and I encountered in the city was wonderful. And despite the TV media's preoccupation with numbers, the Philadelphians I met did not seem surprised to meet and greet me and the many other African-American delegates, alternates and guests.
NEWS
March 5, 2000 | By Leonard N. Fleming, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You don't have to tell Lorraine Franchi how important the U.S. Census is. This time she doesn't want to be overlooked, as she was in the 1990 count. So yesterday, when she saw the hip and colorful Census 2000 truck in North Philadelphia, Franchi, 40, gladly accepted a bag full of census memorabilia and information. That typical response made the job a lot easier for census workers charged with motivating the masses to take the census as seriously as voting or paying routine bills.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2014 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
In the tough part of Brooklyn where she spent her younger years, Bridgette Brawner saw neighbors strung out on drugs, arguments that turned violent, families like her own struggling to get by. But most frightening was watching as other kids grew to accept, and expect, a bleak future. "You get to a certain age and you're shot. Or you get to a certain age and you have a child," she said, recalling Flatbush. " . . . There had to be something else outside of what I was seeing. " A profound thought for a young girl, especially one struggling with personal issues as dark as sexual molestation.
NEWS
May 31, 1996 | By Connie Langland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State Education Secretary Eugene Hickok yesterday rejected the idea that extra money from Harrisburg would improve schools in Pennsylvania's poorest districts. Increased funding would only result in increased teacher salaries, he said. Rather than looking for handouts from the state, districts should look hard for ways to trim spending, he said. In return, Hickok said, the state would search for ways to reward schools that showed academic progress and place sanctions on those that failed to improve.
NEWS
September 17, 2006 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A man and a woman were relaxing last week, enjoying a view from a bed unlike that of most Center City dwellers. They were feet away from a line of trees, inches from a broad patch of grass, and - as it is when you live on the exit ramp of a highway - a few yards from a lot of moving cars. The couple were among eight men and women lying that afternoon on either side of the Broad Street exit of the Vine Street Expressway and part of a growing pack of homeless setting up encampments at the gateway to Center City and outside landmark Philadelphia institutions.
NEWS
December 10, 1993 | By Vernon Loeb, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Rendell figures he used to dig down into his pockets and hand out about $2 a week in quarters and dimes to Center City's panhandlers, finding it hard to say no to those so obviously in need. But the mayor has now thrown his weight behind a new brand of compassion that urges Center City pedestrians to give panhandlers cards referring them to social-service agencies instead of change. Rendell yesterday touted the public education campaign - soon to make its debut on SEPTA buses and Regional Rail lines - based on a single, catchy phrase: "The more you give change, the more things will stay the same.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | By Walter E. Williams
There are few instances in which handouts are more flagrantly immoral than those to corporations. Corporate tax cuts don't qualify as handouts unless you believe that companies' earnings belong to the government and that it's a handout when the government allows corporations to keep more of their earnings. Corporate handouts refer to the evil government practice of taking our money and handing it to corporations. The government can give handouts to corporations simply by using the Internal Revenue Service to take our money and have the Commerce Department or Agriculture Department distribute it. The risk of visible handouts is that they can easily invite voter retaliation against politicians.
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