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Handshake

SPORTS
January 19, 1994 | By Robert Seltzer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two of the top fighters in the city, cruiserweight Nate Miller and welterweight Rodney Moore, have switched promoters, going from J. Russell Peltz to Don King. "They felt they could do better with Don," said Al Braverman, a spokesman for King. Braverman would not disclose how much money the two fighters would receive under their new promoter. "Peltz just had handshake deals with the fighters," Braverman said. "He wasn't smart enough to have signed contracts with them.
NEWS
December 5, 1993
The recent outbursts of violence on the West Bank and in Gaza by radical opponents of the Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement are making many wonder if that risky, breath-takingly optimistic pact is dead. Euphoric memories of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin shaking hands with Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat have been displaced by bloody scenes of Israeli civilians slain by West Bank gunmen, Israeli settlers taking violent revenge on Palestinian civilians and Israeli army shootouts with Palestinian youths.
NEWS
September 20, 1993 | BY JESSE JACKSON
The strafing began before the ink was dry on the historic accord between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization, signed last week in Washington. Neo-conservatives in the United States warn that the agreement won't last. Radical Palestinians and Israeli fundamentalists denounce it. Threats have been issued against Yasser Arafat's life. Legislators are saying there is no money to provide the new aid the parties are seeking. These reactions are sad, if predictable. The scars left from years of blood and tears do not heal in a day. It is hard to put down the bitter hatreds of the past and pick up the promise of a new tomorrow.
NEWS
September 14, 1993
Inviting Yitzhak Rabin and Yasir Arafat to Washington to witness the signing of a declaration of principles for Israeli-Palestinian peace was a huge risk, but not for the obvious reasons. The biggest threat was not terrorism, but the real possibility that such a meeting would arouse a backlash from ordinary Palestinians and Israelis. Many feared peace was happening too soon, before two peoples with a hundred-year history of war were ready to absorb it. The idea of a handshake between Mr. Arafat, long vilified by Israelis as an arch terrorist, and Mr. Rabin, who has crushed the Palestinian uprising against occupation, is shocking to many Jews and Arabs.
SPORTS
June 22, 1992 | By Gary Miles and Glen Macnow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When is a deal a deal? According to four NHL general managers, a trade between two clubs is complete when the teams involved reach an oral agreement. No phone calls or faxes or formal transfer letters are required. In the NHL, says Serge Savard, the longtime general manager of the Montreal Canadiens, business as usual means a handshake and a gentlemen's agreement. "I've done a lot of deals in the past on just an oral agreement," said Savard. "Then I'll do the documentation later.
NEWS
November 6, 1991 | By TRUDY RUBIN
When the chief Israeli and Palestinian negotiators shook hands here on Sunday at the opening of face-to-face peace negotiations, it changed forever the relationship between their two peoples. Until that moment, the Palestinians were defined by Israel mainly as terrorists, or as a population destined to remain under Israeli rule. As for Israel, Palestinians at best viewed it as oppressor and enemy, and at worst as a country that had to be destroyed. But the Madrid meeting placed Israelis and Palestinians on a very different footing.
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
And now, appearing for the defense, Amy Vanderbilt and Miss Manners. Those twin mavens of propriety, our sentinels of etiquette, were invoked as prime authorities recently in Lancaster County Common Pleas Court, as Judge Lawrence Stengel wrestled with The Case of the Negligent Handshake. Stengel was rejecting a negligence complaint brought by Helen Johnson of Manheim, who sued a Lititz man, Richard Vetter, for shaking her hand too hard. Johnson, a member of the Dulcimer Folk musical group hired to entertain the Lititz Women's Club at the General Sutter Inn in Lititz, complained that Vetter, the owner of the inn, was so enthusiastic in greeting her that she suffered a torn rotator cuff on her shoulder.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | By Paddy Noyes, Special to The Inquirer
The pastor believes that it's beneficial for children to speak in front of a congregation, and he sometimes asks them to lead the worship. Darren, 4, has said the Lord's Prayer with only a bit of prompting and a few missed words. He passes the collection plate, gathers up books after the service and takes them to a back table, and greatly enjoys singing hymns. The teacher at Head Start, which Darren attends, says he is at the top level. He's the best behaved of the group, knows when to use "please" and "thank you," and has exemplary table manners.
SPORTS
March 24, 1991 | By Bill Ordine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Eagles coach Buddy Ryan always prided himself on being a trendsetter, from the "46" defense to an off-season workout program that has become a staple around the NFL. Now, Ryan's oft-criticized practice of not shaking hands with opposing coaches has been adopted by the league. Last week at their league meeting in Hawaii, NFL owners called for strict enforcement of a 1981 anti-fraternization rule. The rule bans postgame on- field gatherings among opposing players, as well as the traditional coaches handshake.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | BY ELMER SMITH
Paste a picture of that historic handshake into your anti-apartheid scrapbook. It's an enduring image that South Africa's oppressed majority may recall some day as a key scene from their long freedom struggle. They will recall that Mangosuthu Buthelezi smiled at Nelson Mandela, and said "Hello my brother," and that Mandela addressed him as "Prince Buthelezi. " And in that odd way that the passage of years telescopes time, they may not remember that with that historic handshake, the carnage in which more than 1,000 people were hacked, burned and beaten to death didn't end. After a while, it won't matter that the bitterness and hate - even the maiming and murder - went on long after that picture was snapped in front of the Royal Hotel in Durban on Jan. 28, 1991.
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