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Hank Williams

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1987 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Polygram Records has just released the fifth and sixth volumes of its heroic effort to get back onto vinyl every song that country great Hank Williams ever recorded. This pair of two-record sets, Long Gone Lonesome Blues ( ) and Hey, Good Lookin' ( ), covers the period from 1949 to 1951, when Williams had settled into his fame while producing such masterpieces of melancholy as "I Can't Help It (If I'm Still in Love with You)," "Cold, Cold Heart" and "The Angel of Death.
NEWS
August 21, 1990 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press, Reuters and the Washington Post contributed to this report
Hank Williams Jr. is not about to be left behind in the current war- drumming. The country star wrote an anti-Iraqi song Thursday, rounded up his good musician buddies Friday and recorded it - and it should be in your neighborhood record store by the end of this week. "Don't Give Us a Reason" suggests that the United States and the Soviet Union will kick Iraq's assets if given sufficient reason. One part goes: Don't give us a reason to go gunnin' for for you 'cause the odds don't look good.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1993 | By Dan DeLuca, FOR THE INQUIRER
To paraphrase an observation once made of that other outrageously talented egomaniac, James Brown, it don't matter if nobody else loves Hank Williams Jr., because Hank will always love himself. Sunday night at the Taj Mahal Casino's Mark G. Etess Arena, Randall Hank Jr.'s affection for Randall Hank Jr. was abundantly obvious. At various points in his hour-long, over-the-top set, Williams played before three banners of himself, in about the size and style Saddam Hussein might use to decorate a Baghdad boulevard.
SPORTS
October 11, 2011
Removed after 23 years as the musical intro to Monday Night Football, country singer Hank Williams has responded by writing a song rebuking his critics. ESPN dropped Williams from MNF on Oct. 3 for making a statement comparing President Obama playing golf with House Speaker John Boehner to Hitler playing a round with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Williams is offering the song "Keep the Change" as a free download on his website. He's also scheduled to appear on The View and Hannity on Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1995 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The much-ballyhooed Waterfront Entertainment Centre - adjacent to the New Jersey State Aquarium in Camden - is ready to open its doors. The $56 million, 25,000 capacity, indoor/outdoor, year-round facility makes its entrance into the Philadelphia area concert promoters' sweepstakes tonight with . . . (drum roll please) . . . Hank Williams Jr.? I know what you're thinking: Couldn't they do any better than that? If the super-rich partners in this state-of-the-art building wanted to make a big splash, couldn't they have corralled a bigger marquee draw than the most proudly piggish hat act in existence?
NEWS
May 9, 1989 | By Carol Horner, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press and United Press International contributed to this report
Agents for country singer Hank Williams Jr. have agreed to pay $65,000 to reimburse concertgoers and cover other damages incurred when the country singer aborted an appearance in Baton Rouge, La., Saturday night. Fans became infuriated when Williams, incoherent at times, started and stopped songs, threw his fiddle in the air, cursed the crowd and stumbled off the stage after 20 minutes. They tossed beer bottles, burned Hank Williams Jr. T-shirts and demanded refunds for their $17.50 tickets.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1986 | By Jack Hurst, Special to The Inquirer
Twelve never-released recordings by Hank Williams Sr., including five songs that Williams wrote, make up Hank Williams: The First Recordings, an album now being released by the Country Music Foundation (CMF). "These tracks precede Williams' MGM (Records) hits by three years," says Bob Pinson, the foundation's principal researcher. CMF director Bill Ivey notes that considerable material "has been written about (Williams') short life and career (he died at the age of 29), in particular those years after his MGM hits first dazzled country audiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1987 | By Jack Hurst, Special to The Inquirer
The new Hank Williams Jr. album due out in mid-January, Hank "Live," was recorded coast-to-coast. The 17-cut production was committed to tape during performances at the Mid-South Coliseum in Memphis, Tenn.; Starwood Amphitheater in Nashville, Tenn.; Memorial Stadium in Charlotte, N.C.; Irvine Meadows Amphitheater in Irvine, Calif., and Concord Pavilion in Concord, Calif. The LP includes a lot of titles previously associated with Williams, such as "Hank Williams Junior, Junior" by Dickie Betts and Bonnie Bramlett, "If You Don't Like Hank Williams" by Kris Kristofferson, and "If Heaven Ain't a Lot Like Dixie" by Bill Maddox and David Moore, as well as such compositions of Williams' own as "Man of Steel," "All My Rowdy Friends," "A Country Boy Can Survive" and "The Conversation.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, Reuters, the New York Daily News, the Washington Post and USA Today
Cathy Yvonne Stone, who battled to be declared the daughter of Hank Williams Sr. and continues to fight for a cut of his copyright royalties, got a big boost yesterday when the U.S. Supreme Court let stand a lower-court ruling saying she's entitled to a jury trial to decide the case. Stone, 37, was born five days after the country legend died in 1953. Her mother, Bobbie Jett, and Williams signed a document noting that the then-unborn Stone might be Williams' child. Alabama courts ruled that she was his daughter but not a legal heir.
NEWS
February 11, 1989 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer Staff Writer
As you walk into the WPA Theater and locate your seat for The Night Hank Williams Died, a succession of country-music classics is being played over the sound system - Hank Snow's "I'm Movin' On," Bob Wills' version of "San Antonio Rose" and, most ominously and just seconds before the play begins, Hank Williams' "I'll Never Get Out of This World Alive. " The Night Hank Williams Died is written by Larry L. King, author of The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, but unlike that jaunty, big-hit musical, this small play is bleak and even despairing just below the surface of its lively corn-pone humor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2015 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the first Saturday of the new year, and Doug Seegers was eating breakfast at a McDonald's in West Nashville before heading out to his steadiest gig - playing in front of the local Goodwill store. "Whether I'm playing a big show somewhere or whether I'm playing out on the street for little kids walking by, I get the same kind of joy," Seegers says over the phone. "I'm just looking to play my guitar and spread my music to whoever is around at the time. " Seegers, who plays Sunday at the Ardmore Music Hall, may still enjoy busking, but life certainly has changed over the last year for the 63-year-old country artist.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Jones, 81, the enduring hitmaker who perfected a heart-rending ballad-singing style that distilled the quintessence of country music, died Friday. Mr. Jones died at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, according to publicist Kirt Webster. He was hospitalized with fever and irregular blood pressure, forcing him to postpone two shows. Mr. Jones, regarded as a country music icon of traditionalism and integrity, scored more than 60 Top 10 country hits, beginning with "Why Baby Why" in 1955.
NEWS
March 11, 2013
Holly Williams The Highway (Georgiana ***) The granddaughter of Hank Williams and the daughter of Hank Jr., Holly Williams has forged her own musical path apart from the honky-tonk of the former and the country rock of the latter. But like her forebears at their best, she knows how to connect with the listener, as she does throughout her third and most accomplished album. Thematically, The Highway takes most of its cues from country. Williams' songs cover cheating and drinking, death and family, the push and pull of the road, with a clear eye for life's realities and a full heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2013 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
He's long been known as "Wayne the Train" - a fitting nickname for such a throwback - but these days Wayne Hancock has a new passion when it comes to wheels - motorcycles. "I've been riding for about five years now," the don't-call-him-country singer and songwriter says from his home in Denton, Texas. It's therapy, of sorts. He and his wife are separated, he says: "It gives some balance to my life now, so when I get home [from touring] I'm busy," he explains. "It helps keep my head clear.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2013 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in Toronto, Lindi Ortega got her love of country music from her mother. "She had a big crush on Kris Kristofferson," the 33-year-old singer and songwriter recalls from a tour stop in Kingston, Ontario. "She used to listen to a lot of Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, Merle Haggard, Waylon Jennings. . . . Then the older I got the more drawn to the genre I was. I think it had a lot to do with the lyrical content. A lot of Hank Williams was heartbreak, lonely, hurting, tear-in-your-beer kind of songs that just resonated with me. " Once she heard Outlaw country and Johnny Cash, "it was all over.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
HANK WILLIAMS JR., who sang the "Monday Night Football" theme song until getting booted from the weekly telecast for comparing President Obama to Hitler , remains a man of his convictions - even if they're, to put it nicely, of questionable sense. Hank Jr. made another political stump speech while performing at a concert in Fort Worth, Texas, over the Labor Day holiday - brought to you by our nation's unions. Said an overly enthusiastic Williams, "We've got a Muslim for a president who hates cowboys, hates cowgirls, hates fishing, hates farming, loves gays, and we hate him!"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2011 | By Chris Talbott, Associated Press
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Hank Williams Jr. is about to have his say. Williams has cut a new song, "Keep the Change," calling out Fox & Friends and ESPN after an interview last week on the Fox News talk show led to the end of his association with the sports network and Monday Night Football , long home to his "Are you ready for some football?" theme. "I've been recording for five decades, and I knew that old over-the-fence feeling on this one," Williams said in an interview Monday.
SPORTS
October 11, 2011
Removed after 23 years as the musical intro to Monday Night Football, country singer Hank Williams has responded by writing a song rebuking his critics. ESPN dropped Williams from MNF on Oct. 3 for making a statement comparing President Obama playing golf with House Speaker John Boehner to Hitler playing a round with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Williams is offering the song "Keep the Change" as a free download on his website. He's also scheduled to appear on The View and Hannity on Tuesday.
SPORTS
October 7, 2011
Are you ready for some football? Hank Williams Jr. isn't anymore. The country singer and ESPN each took credit for the decision Thursday morning to ax his classic intro to Monday Night Football . The network had pulled the song from the game earlier this week after Williams made an analogy to Adolf Hitler while discussing President Obama on Fox News on Monday morning. "After reading hundreds of e-mails, I have made MY decision," Williams said in a statement to the Associated Press.
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