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Hannah

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1986 | By JOE BALTAKE, Daily News Film Critic
"Hannah and Her Sisters. " A comedy-drama written and directed by Woody Allen. Featuring Allen, Mia Farrow, Barbara Hershey and Dianne Wiest. Photographed by Carlo Di Palma. Edited by Susan Morse. Music by assorted composers. Running time: 106 minutes. An Orion release. At Sam's Place, 1908 Chestnut St. I was midway through "Hannah and Her Sisters," Woody Allen's funny, graceful, amazingly powerful new movie, before I finally realized exactly what Allen had accomplished. With perhaps the simplest gestures possible, Allen has succeeded in having his cake and eating it, too. With "Hannah and Her Sisters," a seismograph that charts the upheavals and interrelationships in the lives of three women during a two-year period, Allen has made his most Bergmanesque movie - and without blatantly aping Ingmar Bergman the way he has in the past (most glaringly with "Interiors")
SPORTS
June 15, 2000 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
As most people approach retirement age, they make plans to keep themselves busy. Not Bob Hannah. Asked to list his hobbies, the retiring University of Delaware baseball coach said, "None of the above. My thing is people. I need to move around and talk to people. " Hannah, 67, hasn't cleaned out his office. "You don't displace 40 years of debris overnight," he said. Hannah (1,053-464-6 in 36 seasons) led Delaware to 23 conference regular-season titles, 12 conference tournament championships and 12 NCAA Tournament appearances.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
People Like Us is one of those "inspired by true events" stories - a tagline so commonplace these days that its absence from the beginning of Ted comes as kind of a shock. The true events at the heart of Alex Kurtzman's alternately absorbing and maddening Los Angeles melodrama have to do with the director's discovery a few years back that he had a secret sibling. His father was in another marriage, another life, and hadn't let on. In Kurtzman's terribly titled feature debut, it is Sam Harper (Chris Pine)
NEWS
August 24, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
It was 18 years ago. It was yesterday. No matter how long I live, I will never forget the cry that rang out in the birthing suite at Pennsylvania Hospital on that October afternoon. Suddenly, there was a new inhabitant of planet Earth: my first grandchild. Red-faced, tiny fists clenched, this baby girl was clearly expressing her displeasure at being booted out of the home that had sheltered her for nine long months. But she was ready to take on the world. From that instant, I knew that nothing would ever be the same for me. I was now somebody's grandmother.
TRAVEL
August 1, 2016 | By Erica Lamberg, For The Inquirer
It's been more than 16 years since we took a vacation alone with just one of our children, not counting an overnight college visit or baseball tournament. My husband and I are blessed with a daughter, Hannah, 18, and a son, Jared, 15. We always traveled as a family, and those vacations were among our happiest days together as I reflect on my motherhood years. My daughter leaves in August for the University of Florida in Gainesville. For the last seven summers, both of our children went to overnight camp.
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Camden man who a year ago was described as one of that troubled city's most violent offenders has been sentenced to 10 years in prison for selling the powerful hallucinogenic drug PCP. Kevin J. Hannah, 48, also known as ICU, was sentenced Friday by Camden County Superior Court Judge Michael J. Kassel. The sentence stipulates that he is ineligible for parole for 41/2 years. Hannah had pleaded guilty April 1 to first-degree distribution of PCP. On two separate occasions, he sold an ounce of "oil," a liquid form of PCP, to a witness cooperating with law enforcement, according to a spokesman for the state Attorney General's Office.
NEWS
August 26, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Mackay of Pitman saw some red flags before she bought a puppy almost two years ago from a dog broker in Salem County, particularly an inoculation record that didn't seem to come from a veterinarian. But Mackay adored the collie and decided to take it home for the holidays that December. By the time they got there, the dog, which Mackay had been told was in treatment for routine kennel cough, was vomiting and had diarrhea. "I should have known better," said Mackay, who has owned other dogs, including a collie mix. This month, the broker, Jessica Durkin of Salem, was sued by the New Jersey Attorney General's Office on behalf of four other dog owners who allege Durkin sold them sick puppies, including one so ill that the family had it euthanized.
TRAVEL
September 18, 2011 | By Mark Davis, For The Inquirer
It's breakfast time at the Ylang Ylang Beach Resort in Montezuma, Costa Rica, and that means not only fabulous food but also exotic entertainment. Hannah, my 7-year-old daughter, is enjoying tropical banana pancakes, while I savor the tipico breakfast of beans, rice, eggs, tortillas, and plantains. Perched on the back of the third chair at our table is a white-throated magpie-jay. The thunder of Pacific Ocean waves breaking 90 feet away bothers neither us nor the bird. Adjacent to the patio restaurant where we sit, a large spiny-tailed iguana ambles across the lawn.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1989 | By Kathleen Carroll, New York Daily News
Guy Jones, the seemingly shy hero of "A Chorus of Disapproval," causes quite a stir in the English resort of Scarborough. Guy, a low-level employee of a major electronics firm, is attracted by a newspaper ad that says "Meet People. Have fun. " Actually, it's an announcement for tryouts for the light opera company. Guy shows up with a torn copy of "All Through the Night," the song he has chosen for his audition. The officious stage manager reluctantly introduces him to the temperamental director of the company, Dafydd Llewellyn, a crusty Welshman whose tolerance for his cast of dizzy amateurs clearly has its limits.
NEWS
June 19, 2012 | By David Crary and Kristen Wyatt, Associated Press
DENVER - Michael Jolton was a young father with a 5-year-old son when Colorado legalized medical marijuana in 2000. Now he's got three boys, the oldest near adulthood, and finds himself repeatedly explaining green-leafed marijuana ads and "free joint" promotions endemic in his suburban hometown. "I did not talk to my oldest son about marijuana when he was 8 years old. We got to talk about fun stuff. Now with my youngest who's 8, we have to talk about this," said Jolton. A marijuana opponent with a just-say-no philosophy, Jolton, 48, is among legions of American parents finding the "drug talk" increasingly problematic as more states allow medical marijuana or decriminalize its use. Colorado and Washington state have measures on their Nov. 6 ballot that would go a further step and legalize recreational use of marijuana for adults.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
August 1, 2016 | By Erica Lamberg, For The Inquirer
It's been more than 16 years since we took a vacation alone with just one of our children, not counting an overnight college visit or baseball tournament. My husband and I are blessed with a daughter, Hannah, 18, and a son, Jared, 15. We always traveled as a family, and those vacations were among our happiest days together as I reflect on my motherhood years. My daughter leaves in August for the University of Florida in Gainesville. For the last seven summers, both of our children went to overnight camp.
NEWS
November 13, 2015 | BY TIRDAD DERAKHSHANI, Inquirer Staff Writer tirdad@phillynews.com, 215-854-2736
"SHELTER" isn't an easy film to watch. An uncompromising, sometimes bleak melodrama about the quotidian experience of a pair of homeless New Yorkers who fall in love, actor Paul Bettany's directorial debut isn't a movie you enjoy so much as endure. Bettany, 44, who has made more than 40 films, including "iGangster No. 1," "The Reckoning" and "Master and Commander," proves to be the perfect actor's director, coaxing winning performances from his leads, Anthony Mackie ("The Hurt Locker")
NEWS
August 26, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Mackay of Pitman saw some red flags before she bought a puppy almost two years ago from a dog broker in Salem County, particularly an inoculation record that didn't seem to come from a veterinarian. But Mackay adored the collie and decided to take it home for the holidays that December. By the time they got there, the dog, which Mackay had been told was in treatment for routine kennel cough, was vomiting and had diarrhea. "I should have known better," said Mackay, who has owned other dogs, including a collie mix. This month, the broker, Jessica Durkin of Salem, was sued by the New Jersey Attorney General's Office on behalf of four other dog owners who allege Durkin sold them sick puppies, including one so ill that the family had it euthanized.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hannah and Rachael Tipperman haven't even begun their senior years in high school, yet already their passion for robotics has gained them international attention. The 17-year-old Devon twins founded a nonprofit two years ago to help them spread their enthusiasm for robotics to other children. And in the last two weeks, after their story was detailed by The Inquirer, people from around the world have contacted them offering - and soliciting - help. Last week, the Tippermans said, they received an e-mail from a 20-year-old in Uganda who had always dreamed of building robots and wanted help to create a robotics program for two young siblings.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2013
Hannah Arendt - Barbara Sukowa portrays the writer and philosopher who covered the 1961 trial of Adolf Eichmann for the New Yorker in this period drama. Also starring Janet McTeer as Arendt's friend Mary McCarthy. (No MPAA rating, Ritz Bourse)
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Camden man who a year ago was described as one of that troubled city's most violent offenders has been sentenced to 10 years in prison for selling the powerful hallucinogenic drug PCP. Kevin J. Hannah, 48, also known as ICU, was sentenced Friday by Camden County Superior Court Judge Michael J. Kassel. The sentence stipulates that he is ineligible for parole for 41/2 years. Hannah had pleaded guilty April 1 to first-degree distribution of PCP. On two separate occasions, he sold an ounce of "oil," a liquid form of PCP, to a witness cooperating with law enforcement, according to a spokesman for the state Attorney General's Office.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
I really need to keep up with my recommended dosages. Still haven't gotten my flu shot for the virus that is ravaging the country. And I never drank the Kool-Aid that has made every TV critic in America fall madly, deeply in love with HBO's Girls . Time's James Poniewozik hailed the series as "raw, audacious, nuanced and richly, often excruciatingly funny. " As I read one accolade after another about Girls , I honestly found myself wondering whether we were watching the same show.
SPORTS
January 3, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
IT WAS GOOD to see Hannah Storm come off injured reserve on Tuesday. The ESPN anchor helped host the Rose Bowl Parade in Pasadena, Calif., 3 weeks after suffering serious burns in a outdoor grill accident. Storm was making dinner for her family at her home in Connecticut on Dec. 11 when a propane grill exploded when she tried to relight it. She suffered first-degree burns to her face and neck and second-degree burns on her hands and chest. The fire also singed her eyebrows and eyelashes, and burned off about half her hair.
NEWS
August 24, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
It was 18 years ago. It was yesterday. No matter how long I live, I will never forget the cry that rang out in the birthing suite at Pennsylvania Hospital on that October afternoon. Suddenly, there was a new inhabitant of planet Earth: my first grandchild. Red-faced, tiny fists clenched, this baby girl was clearly expressing her displeasure at being booted out of the home that had sheltered her for nine long months. But she was ready to take on the world. From that instant, I knew that nothing would ever be the same for me. I was now somebody's grandmother.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
People Like Us is one of those "inspired by true events" stories - a tagline so commonplace these days that its absence from the beginning of Ted comes as kind of a shock. The true events at the heart of Alex Kurtzman's alternately absorbing and maddening Los Angeles melodrama have to do with the director's discovery a few years back that he had a secret sibling. His father was in another marriage, another life, and hadn't let on. In Kurtzman's terribly titled feature debut, it is Sam Harper (Chris Pine)
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