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September 21, 2001 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
. . . All this death and talk of killing makes me want so badly to put my trumpet in my mouth and embrace the people, especially the babies, in sound, a sound that goes far beyond the madness of man. - From Hannibal's Philadelphia journal Hannibal, the internationally acclaimed jazz trumpeter and composer, has assumed a new role over the last two weeks: guidance counselor. He arrived in Philadelphia Sept. 10 to begin an 11-day residency at the High School for the Creative and Performing Arts (CAPA)
NEWS
December 3, 1999 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA. Andre Raphel Smith conducting the music of Ives, Still and Hannibal. Academy of Music, Broad and Locust streets, 2 p.m. Friday, 8 p.m. Saturday and Tuesday. Tickets: $17.50-$57.50. Info: 215-893-1999. A long interview with Hannibal is like getting a bear hug over the telephone. His passion for life, growth, spirituality and individual expression is so powerful and life-affirming as to provoke both smiles and lasting thought. The trumpeter/composer's new work, "One Heart Beating," is the first of eight Philadelphia Orchestra commissions in its 100th-anniversary celebration.
NEWS
April 22, 2013 | Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - NBC said Friday that it's pulling an episode of its serial-killer drama "Hannibal" out of sensitivity to recent violence, including the Boston bombings. The episode that was to air next week features a character, played by guest star Molly Shannon, who brainwashes children to kill other children. "Hannibal" executive producer Bryan Fuller asked NBC to pull the episode, citing the Newtown, Conn., school shooting in December and this week's Boston Marathon attack, NBC spokesman Stuart Levine said.
SPORTS
July 12, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The back of Hannibal's black bathrobe said he was "Da Most Electrifying One. " The emcee wore a heavyweight title belt on Friday afternoon and traversed the Philadelphia University basketball court with a microphone. He makes his home at Harlem's Rucker Park and was brought in to give the all-star game at the Reebok Classic Breakout a playground-like vibe. If he needed reason to use that microphone - likely, he didn't - Hannibal found it in Archbishop Carroll's Derrick Jones. The area's top basketball recruit soared for a two-handed alley-oop midway through the first half.
NEWS
March 23, 2003 | By Margot Callahan FOR THE INQUIRER
We went in search of flour and found Hannibal. In the village of Poggio di Loro, in the Tuscany region of Italy, the owner of the local market told us of a young man who still made flour from castagne, chestnuts, in a water-powered mill that had been in his family for generations. "He has no children," she said. "The mill will close when he retires, just like the 18 others have in the last 20 years. Without the nearby mill, the chestnut tradition will likely die. " With the expectation of seeing the last dinosaur, we made our way north and east along CAI 21, a network of trails maintained by the Pratomagno Hikers Association and dating to the Roman and Etruscan periods.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1999 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The first of the Philadelphia Orchestra's Centennial Commissions rolled off the line Thursday night - a pulsing, repetitive, large-scale piece for orchestra, chorus and soprano by Hannibal called One Heart Beating. The new work, an oratorio on forgiveness, was presented amid much hand-holding in the form of program notes, more program notes, a preconcert discussion, and a few words after the concert by the composer himself. Learning about a composer's aim is almost always valuable.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1997 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Amistad, the book, the movie and the opera all named for the American vessel of slavery, are offering us a chance to re-examine treacheries that too long dominated the African American experience. And over at the Academy of Music, a piece composed seven years ago by a performer who goes by the name of Hannibal offers its own take on aspects of American racism and African American history. It's a musical depiction filled with sadness and violence - and even more gladness and vibrancy.
NEWS
April 19, 2011
Harold L. Volkmer, 80, a 20-year Democratic congressman from northeast Missouri known for his advocacy of the rights of gun owners, died Saturday at a Hannibal nursing home after several bouts of pneumonia, the James O'Donnell Funeral Home in Hannibal said. Born in Jefferson City, Mr. Volkmer served a stint in the Army and then graduated from the University of Missouri School of Law. He was elected county prosecutor in 1960 and served in that role until his election to the Missouri House in 1966.
NEWS
December 5, 1997 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
AFRICAN PORTRAITS. Academy of Music, Broad and Locust streets. 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday & Tuesday. Tickets: $12-$85. Info: 215-893-1999. It has been critically acclaimed as a brilliant work and a stunning masterpiece, but "African Portraits" - the epic oratorio being performed tonight by the Philadelphia Orchestra - started as a hum. For more than a few years, the hum lived within the head of 49-year-old jazz trumpeter and composer Hannibal....
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2016
A delicious 'Hannibal' When the trailer for Marvel's Doctor Stranger hit San Diego Comic Con last week, most people squealed at the sight of Benedict Cumberbatch as the superhero sorcerer. But we were much more excited to see the bad guy. Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen - you may remember him as the Bond villain who cried blood in Casino Royale - plays the next Marvel antagonist. And while we're sure he'll be great, he already brought menacing to a whole new level in Hannibal , NBC's horror-drama that ran for three seasons, all of which are streaming on Amazon.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
No one could have blamed Hugh Dancy if, after three seasons of wrestling with evil in NBC's Hannibal , he'd booked himself a romantic comedy. Or taken a break, at least, from darkness. Instead, though, he headed off almost immediately toward The Path , a drama premiering Wednesday on Hulu that stars Aaron Paul ( Breaking Bad ) and Michelle Monaghan ( True Detective ) as Eddie and Sarah Lane, a couple in crisis. Dancy plays Cal Roberts, a man with serious demons who is trying to lead the cultlike religious movement to which all three belong toward a light that may be fading.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2015 | Tom Di Nardo, For the Daily News
Hannibal Lokumbe calls his new work, "One Land, One River, One People," a "spiritatorio. " Commissioned by the Philadelphia Orchestra, it's less a concert piece than a spiritual explosion - a gumbo of blues, jazz, spirituals and joyful rhythm. Yannick Nezet-Seguin will conduct the work this weekend in a program that will begin with Copland's familiar "Appalachian Spring" and Sibelius' stirring "Finlandia. " "One Land" is scored for soprano Laquita Mitchell and tenor Rodrick Dixon, plus three choirs: the Delaware State University Choir, the Lincoln University Concert Choir and Morgan State University Choir.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
One would be hard-pressed to find any similarities between two crime procedurals hitting the box this week: ABC Family's new series Stitchers , which premieres at 9 p.m. Tuesday, is cute and so slight in dramatic gravitas that it floats away into the ether. The reverse is true of NBC's surreal Nietzschean parable Hannibal , which returns for its third season at 10 p.m. Thursday. One of the most unremittingly dark, vicious stories about murder, Hannibal enthralls the viewer's aesthetic sense with its stunning photography, sophisticated use of imagery, and breathtaking beauty while at the same time threatening to steal away our soul, dragging it deep into the void.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Comedian Hannibal Buress deserved to sell out the Music Box at Atlantic City's Borgata on Saturday - just on the merits of his sharply incisive talents. Anyone making topics such as toilet paper, racist babies, and sports heroes on steroids ("Thank you for ruining your long-term health for our short-term entertainment") funny should be celebrated. But face it: Buress owes much to Bill Cosby. Before Oct. 16, Buress was a silly, observational stand-up known mostly for acting bits on 30 Rock and Comedy Central fare like Broad City . At September's end, I caught Buress opening for Aziz Ansari at the Wells Fargo Center with Seinfeld-ian parking shtick: Cranky stuff, but nothing innovative or memorable.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
In Act II Playhouse's Mark Twain Unplugged , Tom Teti, as Twain, remarks, "The works of fine literature are like wine; mine are like water. But everybody drinks water. " Much beloved, oft-quoted, occasionally banned, with a history as colorful as his characters, the author makes an excellent, lively subject for a solo show. Unfortunately, this isn't that show. Teti, who also wrote the script and appeared in a 2012 People's Light and Theatre production as Twain, dons the white linen suit, white hair and iconic droopy moustache again here.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Francesca Serritella, For The Inquirer
I have a terrible personality. According to Meyers-Briggs. My best friend sent me a version of the famous personality test to discover whether we would be good candidates for the CIA, hypothetically. It's the kind of thing we do. Don't ask. She forwarded me a Web link to a shortened version of the test. Neither of us had the spy personality; she was an INFJ and I came up with an INTJ - twinsies! Then I learned what my acronym meant: Introverted, Intuitive, Thinking, and Judgmental.
SPORTS
July 14, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The back of Hannibal's black bathrobe said he was "Da Most Electrifying One. " The emcee wore a heavyweight title belt on Friday afternoon and traversed the Philadelphia University basketball court with a microphone. He makes his home at Harlem's Rucker Park and was brought in to give the all-star game at the Reebok Classic Breakout a playground-like vibe. If he needed reason to use that microphone - likely, he didn't - Hannibal found it in Archbishop Carroll's Derrick Jones. The area's top basketball recruit soared for a two-handed alley-oop midway through the first half.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chloƫ Sevigny, who had a memorable turn as a transsexual contract killer in British TV writer Paul Abbott's Hit & Miss , continues to court the quirky with Those Who Kill , a reimagining of the Danish crime drama from X-Files and Millennium writer Glen Morgan. It's potable, for sure, though not exactly vintage stuff. Premiering Monday on A&E, Those Who Kill pretty much lifts its story lines from the Danish hit, but it has a much more perverse take on its main characters.
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