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Hannibal Lecter

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NEWS
June 6, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Novelist Thomas Harris returns Hannibal Lecter to bookstores Tuesday, when his 480-page sequel to Silence of the Lambs goes on sale. Hannibal, featuring the psychopathic killer and cannibal on the loose after escaping from an insane asylum, has a first-printing of 1.2 million copies. Harris, yet to grant an in-depth interview in 20 years, will not promote the book with the usual signings and TV talk shows. "When I asked him why he wanted to avoid the press, he said that all he has to say is through his books," noted Delacorte editor in chief Carole Baron.
LIVING
February 8, 2001 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The irony isn't lost on Anthony Hopkins: Here he is, a self-described loner who keeps few friends and craves his solitude, throwing himself into a marathon weekend of news conferences, nonstop TV and print interviews, and a star-studded premiere. There he is in People magazine ("At Home With Hannibal"). Over there, he's beaming inscrutably from the cover of TV Guide. Last week, it was prime time across America, mug-to-mug with Barbara Walters on 20/20, talking about his alcoholism (he hasn't touched a drink in 25 years)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
One would be hard-pressed to find any similarities between two crime procedurals hitting the box this week: ABC Family's new series Stitchers , which premieres at 9 p.m. Tuesday, is cute and so slight in dramatic gravitas that it floats away into the ether. The reverse is true of NBC's surreal Nietzschean parable Hannibal , which returns for its third season at 10 p.m. Thursday. One of the most unremittingly dark, vicious stories about murder, Hannibal enthralls the viewer's aesthetic sense with its stunning photography, sophisticated use of imagery, and breathtaking beauty while at the same time threatening to steal away our soul, dragging it deep into the void.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2001 | By DAVID BLEILER and DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
THOMAS HARRIS' third Hannibal Lecter novel, "Hannibal," was greeted with critical savagery, in part because it was such a radical departure from the taut suspenser "Silence of the Lambs. " Ridley Scott's blockbuster "Hannibal" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $29.99) suffered similar criticism, in part due to its faithfulness in tone to the novel. Where Jonathan Demme's "Silence of the Lambs" (getting re-released this week, VHS: $9.99; DVD: $24.99) traded on claustrophobia, suggestion and intense intimacy, "Hannibal" takes a turn into Gothic horror, with the cards laid graphically on the table.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* HANNIBAL. 10 p.m. Thursday, NBC10.   AS THE creative mind behind Fox's "Wonderfalls" and ABC's "Pushing Daisies," Bryan Fuller is known for making the kind of beautiful television not nearly enough people watch. On Thursday, Fuller returns with NBC's "Hannibal," a gorgeously realized production with a difference. This one comes with a built-in audience that can't get enough of fiction's favorite serial killer, Dr. Hannibal Lecter (here played by Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2001 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Posing as an art curator in Florence, Italy - strolling the palazzi, eyeballing the Duomo, giving pickpockets more than they bargained for in the arcades - Hannibal Lecter seems happy in his retirement. He's mellowed some in the 10 years since we last encountered him, and seems content tinkering at the piano, ambling the banks of the Arno, and keeping tabs on the girl of his dreams - FBI agent Clarice Starling - in the newspapers and on the Net. Of course, there's the odd repast - ingredients to include human organs - to keep him sated.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
What about the fava beans and Chianti? Much is explained in Hannibal Rising, the marvelously risible origin tale of the celebrated sociopath Hannibal Lecter. His fetish for masks? Check. His skill with a scalpel? Got it. His penchant for cannibalism? Ahh, we see! But while considerable light is shed on the pathology of the Silence of the Lambs psychokiller - and the mad murderer of several other blood-soaked movie hits and mega-selling tomes - Lecter's taste for Tuscan wine and vicia faba remains a mystery.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Hannibal Lecter is about to hang his next victim from a balcony overlooking a piazza in Florence, Italy. With the unctuous concern of a Saville Row tailor, he solicitously inquires: "Bowels in or out?" Since the poor fellow is gagged and in no position to answer, Lecter makes the choice for him. In one of the many gruesome moments splattered across Ridley Scott's Hannibal, Lecter guts the man with a practiced slash. The victim's intestines spill down to the square below as he dangles from the rope.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2002 | BY ROB LOWMAN, LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS
When Michael Mann directed "Manhunter" in 1986, he was hot off his television success with "Miami Vice. " The film - despite a number of virtues - has a TV crime-procedural feel. Since then, Mann has gone on to make a number of acclaimed films, including "Heat," "The Insider" and "Ali. " Interestingly, both "Manhunter" and "Red Dragon," based on the book "Red Dragon" by Thomas Harris, which is the prequel to "Silence of the Lambs," were shot by cinematographer Dante Spinotti - but to different effect.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1992 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Anthony Hopkins and Jodie Foster, Monday night's Academy Awards were almost a repeat performance. One week earlier in London, when U.K. movie folk held their annual Oscar equivalent, the BAFTAs (the British Academy of Film and Television Arts), the man who played Hannibal Lecter and the woman who played his brain-picker accepted best actor and actress honors for The Silence of the Lambs. Still, the Silence of the Lambs' Oscar sweep came as something of a surprise to industry observers, who figured Hopkins wouldn't win Stateside because British actors (Jeremy Irons, Daniel Day Lewis)
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
One would be hard-pressed to find any similarities between two crime procedurals hitting the box this week: ABC Family's new series Stitchers , which premieres at 9 p.m. Tuesday, is cute and so slight in dramatic gravitas that it floats away into the ether. The reverse is true of NBC's surreal Nietzschean parable Hannibal , which returns for its third season at 10 p.m. Thursday. One of the most unremittingly dark, vicious stories about murder, Hannibal enthralls the viewer's aesthetic sense with its stunning photography, sophisticated use of imagery, and breathtaking beauty while at the same time threatening to steal away our soul, dragging it deep into the void.
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* HANNIBAL. 10 p.m. Thursday, NBC10.   AS THE creative mind behind Fox's "Wonderfalls" and ABC's "Pushing Daisies," Bryan Fuller is known for making the kind of beautiful television not nearly enough people watch. On Thursday, Fuller returns with NBC's "Hannibal," a gorgeously realized production with a difference. This one comes with a built-in audience that can't get enough of fiction's favorite serial killer, Dr. Hannibal Lecter (here played by Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen)
NEWS
April 5, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Extreme violence comes our way on the small screen this week with the premieres of two disturbing but equally engrossing shows. HBO expands its strong documentary roster with Vice , a half-hour news magazine (11 p.m. Friday) produced by the founders of the controversial print magazine of the same name. On the fictional front, NBC adds to the swelling ranks of prime-time serial killers with Hannibal , a nightmarish psychological thriller about the life, loves - and gourmet meals - of psychiatrist, killer, and cannibal Hannibal Lecter.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
What about the fava beans and Chianti? Much is explained in Hannibal Rising, the marvelously risible origin tale of the celebrated sociopath Hannibal Lecter. His fetish for masks? Check. His skill with a scalpel? Got it. His penchant for cannibalism? Ahh, we see! But while considerable light is shed on the pathology of the Silence of the Lambs psychokiller - and the mad murderer of several other blood-soaked movie hits and mega-selling tomes - Lecter's taste for Tuscan wine and vicia faba remains a mystery.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2002 | BY ROB LOWMAN, LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS
When Michael Mann directed "Manhunter" in 1986, he was hot off his television success with "Miami Vice. " The film - despite a number of virtues - has a TV crime-procedural feel. Since then, Mann has gone on to make a number of acclaimed films, including "Heat," "The Insider" and "Ali. " Interestingly, both "Manhunter" and "Red Dragon," based on the book "Red Dragon" by Thomas Harris, which is the prequel to "Silence of the Lambs," were shot by cinematographer Dante Spinotti - but to different effect.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2001 | By DAVID BLEILER and DAVID GORGOS For the Daily News
THOMAS HARRIS' third Hannibal Lecter novel, "Hannibal," was greeted with critical savagery, in part because it was such a radical departure from the taut suspenser "Silence of the Lambs. " Ridley Scott's blockbuster "Hannibal" (VHS: priced for rental; DVD: $29.99) suffered similar criticism, in part due to its faithfulness in tone to the novel. Where Jonathan Demme's "Silence of the Lambs" (getting re-released this week, VHS: $9.99; DVD: $24.99) traded on claustrophobia, suggestion and intense intimacy, "Hannibal" takes a turn into Gothic horror, with the cards laid graphically on the table.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2001 | By FRANCESCA CHAPMAN chapmaf@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
BECAUSE SOME people just can't get enough of Anthony Hopkins baring his teeth and smacking his lips over various human organs, the actor is in talks to star as Hannibal the Cannibal one more time. The Hollywood trades say Hopkins, who has appeared as the stylish psychopath Hannibal Lecter in 1991's "Silence of the Lambs" and last year's "Hannibal," is interested in reprising the role for "Red Dragon. " The project is being billed as the prequel to "Lambs" and "Hannibal. " The film would be based on Thomas Harris' 1981 best-seller "Red Dragon," which introduced the Hannibal character to an unsuspecting world.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Hannibal Lecter is about to hang his next victim from a balcony overlooking a piazza in Florence, Italy. With the unctuous concern of a Saville Row tailor, he solicitously inquires: "Bowels in or out?" Since the poor fellow is gagged and in no position to answer, Lecter makes the choice for him. In one of the many gruesome moments splattered across Ridley Scott's Hannibal, Lecter guts the man with a practiced slash. The victim's intestines spill down to the square below as he dangles from the rope.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2001 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Posing as an art curator in Florence, Italy - strolling the palazzi, eyeballing the Duomo, giving pickpockets more than they bargained for in the arcades - Hannibal Lecter seems happy in his retirement. He's mellowed some in the 10 years since we last encountered him, and seems content tinkering at the piano, ambling the banks of the Arno, and keeping tabs on the girl of his dreams - FBI agent Clarice Starling - in the newspapers and on the Net. Of course, there's the odd repast - ingredients to include human organs - to keep him sated.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Looking back, it's easy to see why Clarice Starling and Hannibal Lecter emerged as the most interesting couple of 1991. As the battle of the sexes peaked, with skirmish lines (Mars, Venus, etc.) forming in the workplace and in singles bars, "The Silence of the Lambs" brought us the freakiest blind date imaginable. Starling, the inexperienced but quietly ambitious young career woman, paired off with Lecter, the quintessential Angry White Male. This was a fix-up, of course: Starling's matchmaking boss figured that her mixture of looks, potential and naivete would intrigue the jaded Lecter, and he was right.
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