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Hans Vonk

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NEWS
December 2, 1989 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Dutch conductor Hans Vonk presided over a Philadelphia Orchestra program last night that could not have been better planned or for the most part better played. It consisted of Stravinsky's Four Studies, Glazunov's Violin Concerto in A minor, and Schumann's Symphony No. 4 in D Minor - whose distinct personalities followed one another with the easy complementarity one wishes to encounter more often. The Four Studies made a model opener, and its acerbic wit and clever rhythms were articulated with panache.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1995 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dutch conductor Hans Vonk will become music director of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra at the start of the 1996-97 season, the symphony announced yesterday. Vonk will succeed Leonard Slatkin, who will leave the post after the 1995-96 season to lead the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington. Vonk, who will conduct the Philadelphia Orchestra in concerts this week, flew to St. Louis from Philadelphia for the announcement yesterday, cutting short a rehearsal of Richard Wernick's Symphony No. 2, which will be premiered Thursday at the Academy of Music.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Two seasons ago, when Bernard Rands began his tenure as composer-in- residence with the Philadelphia Orchestra, he discussed with Riccardo Muti the idea of bringing younger talents to the Academy of Music. Among them was the 26-year-old Augusta Read Thomas, whose Glass Moon receives its world premiere this afternoon. Rands says he has been especially gratified to find such talents as Thomas and 29-year-old Daron Hagen, whose Symphony No. 1 will be heard in April. "My belief is that American composers in general have to wait until their 40s to get a performance," Rands says, "and yet a performance with this orchestra is so important.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1987 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Stealing a phrase from that indefatigable composer and conductor Lukas Foss, this is a good time to "Meet the Moderns. " Significant music by the late Roger Sessions and Vincent Persichetti - and by the very much alive Maestro Foss - can be heard at separate events this weekend. There is also the opportunity to meet Foss in person and to greet, at least from the audience, a distinguished newcomer to our city, conductor Hans Vonk. PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA. Vonk is a rising star on the European horizon, where two years ago he was appointed music director of Europe's oldest orchestra, the refined Dresden Staatskappelle, and its affiliate, the Dresden State Opera.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The Philadelphia Orchestra yesterday offered the young person's guide to the orchestra. Under the direction of Hans Vonk, it premiered a work by the 26-year-old composer Augusta Read Thomas and introduced as its soloist the 19- year-old, American-born Israeli violinist Gil Shaham. Thomas' piece, Glass Moon, opened the concert - as it should, since it was about 11 minutes of boldly considered music that celebrated the sound of the instruments and seemed to reaffirm the vitality of orchestral music in general.
NEWS
December 8, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
Sibelius illustrates the fairy tale better than N.C. Wyeth, one was reminded again when The Swan of Tuonela opened the Philadelphia Orchestra's concert yesterday afternoon. Atypically sitting front and center of the woodwind section, English hornist Louis Rosenblatt delivered the famous solo, whose eloquence stems in part from its mysterious stillness. One savored Rosenblatt's mastery of his instrument - how lovingly he releases and sustains a pitch, extends a tone, diminishes or increases its volume.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1992 | By Peter Dobrin, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
There's a marvelous photograph of Bela Bartok taken by his friend Zoltan Kodaly while the two composers were out somewhere in Hungary hunting for their favorite catch - folk tunes. The picture shows Bartok beside an old gramophone and some less-than-enthusiastic music-makers. You would never know by looking at the stern faces of the villagers what joyous music poured into Bartok's recorder. These folk tunes showed up in the Rhapsodies for violin and orchestra, played last night by the Philadelphia Orchestra, conductor Hans Vonk and violinist Robert McDuffie at the Academy of Music.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1989 | By Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
The heart of the season means musical abundance in a spectrum spanning orchestras, chamber music ensembles and opera. Violinist Oscar Shumsky, who soloed with the Philadelphia Orchestra two years ago after a 45-year absence, returns to play the romantic Violin Concerto (1904) by Alexander Glazunov in the Academy concerts tonight and Tuesday at 8. The three movements, played without pause, are a brilliant showpiece for soloist and orchestra, one of the last efforts of the 19th- century Russian romantic school.
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NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Sergei Rachmaninoff was well past the nervous breakdown that threatened to end his composing life when he finished his Symphony No. 2 . However, this 1907 lush, lyrical, hour-long piece was restored to its monumentally neurotic status in guest conductor Gianandrea Noseda's Friday outing with the Philadelphia Orchestra - in an all-Rachmaninoff program also featuring the debut of pianist Denis Matsuev. In the symphony, rhythms were nervous, almost terrifying. Orchestral choirs were constantly invading from the side door - dramatically poised against the backdrop of the composer's customary orchestral luster.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1997 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For me, Christmas is about sense-memory - mingling aromas of tangerines and pine needles in cold air, the smell of Mom's cookie kitchen-factory, all steamy and buttery. These are the holiday stimulants that most strongly evoke childhood's happiest moments. And of course, there is the music - the glorious performance of The Nutcracker and A Ceremony of Carols that conjure dressing up for first concerts. A touch of Vince Guaraldi and I am back in front of the television for a dose of A Charlie Brown Christmas and a cup of Dutch hot chocolate with my brothers and sisters.
NEWS
February 19, 1997 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Three festivals, a spotlight on first-chair musicians and expansion of the popular Classix Live programs will mark the Philadelphia Orchestra's 1997-98 season. Music director Wolfgang Sawallisch, who will lead 12 of the 31 weeks in his fifth season, announced the season yesterday from the Academy stage. He stressed two festivals, centering on Schubert's 200th birthday year and three January programs featuring eight principal players. Assistant conductor Andre Raphel Smith mentioned the third festival, "African-American Traditions," featuring Hannibal's colorful "African Portraits.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1997 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In an unprecedented plan, 14 orchestra members will be soloists with the Philadelphia Orchestra next season, music director Wolfgang Sawallisch said yesterday in announcing details of the 1997-98 season. Under poster-sized photographs of orchestra members, which hung over the stage at the Academy of Music, Sawallisch unveiled plans for a three-week festival of concertos next January that will feature many of the principal players he has engaged in his five years as music director.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1995 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dutch conductor Hans Vonk will become music director of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra at the start of the 1996-97 season, the symphony announced yesterday. Vonk will succeed Leonard Slatkin, who will leave the post after the 1995-96 season to lead the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington. Vonk, who will conduct the Philadelphia Orchestra in concerts this week, flew to St. Louis from Philadelphia for the announcement yesterday, cutting short a rehearsal of Richard Wernick's Symphony No. 2, which will be premiered Thursday at the Academy of Music.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
To paraphrase poet W.H. Auden: You don't have to see the results of a person's livelihood to know if his profession is indeed his calling. You can tell even as he approaches his work "from the look on his face. " I couldn't see Hans Vonk's face Thursday night when he led the Philadelphia Orchestra in the Bruckner Symphony No. 6 in A major. But I'm sure the Dutch conductor had what Auden calls that rapt "eye on the object" look - for the music issuing forth under his waving arms spoke of conviction, of a passionate belief.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The trumpet has sounded through much of composer Donald Erb's music, naturally enough, since he began his musical life as a trumpeter. In his Concerto for Brass and Orchestra which had its local premiere Thursday in the Philadelphia Orchestra's concert at the Academy of Music, the trumpet is again the spokesman, the referee and probably the most rounded character in the busy and sometimes risible drama of the music. The work was the centerpiece of the concert conducted by Hans Vonk.
NEWS
February 24, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Philadelphia Orchestra will premiere three commissioned works next season as it plays its interim year without a music director. Wolfgang Sawallisch, music director-designate, and Riccardo Muti, conductor laureate, will each conduct four weeks of the subscription series in spring 1993, and Sawallisch will lead the orchestra on a three-week Asian tour in May and early June. Sawallisch also will conduct the opening gala Sept. 15, 1992, when pianist Emanuel Ax will be soloist in the Beethoven Concerto No. 5 and a "Come and Meet the Music" concert, March 15, 1993.
NEWS
February 12, 1991 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
The "unplayable music" that thrice defeated the Philadelphia Orchestra was finally performed in its entirety here over the weekend, thanks to conductor Gunther Schuller's indomitable desire to play it. But its six-year saga had a curiously inconclusive ending. Schuller and a 50-member string orchestra played Milton Babbitt's Transfigured Notes in concerts Friday and Saturday at Jordan Hall of the New England Conservatory of Music. The concerts had the air of an epochal event, a sense (encouraged by Schuller)
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