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Hanukkah

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NEWS
November 28, 1994 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
A giant menorah erected by the Philadelphia Lubavitcher Center at the Judge Lewis Quadrangle across from Independence Hall was illuminated at 4 p.m. yesterday on the first day of Hanukkah, the eight-day Jewish Festival of Lights. Hanukkah celebrates the victory of the Maccabees, a small band of Jews who rebelled against their oppressors in the second century B.C. and defeated the forces of the Greek-Syrian king Antiochus IV.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Daniel Deagler
Like modern Israel, biblical Israel had many enemies. The average person today can conceptualize some of them - the Egyptians, for example - but based on the holy book, it's hard to distinguish among the Canaanites and Ammonites, the Hittites and Philistines. The Bible is not a history book, and certainly not one written by a disinterested third party. Enemies of the Israelites are presented as just that. But in the case of the conflict commemorated by Hanukkah, understanding the enemy involved can provide much insight.
NEWS
December 5, 1988 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Hanukkah - the Jewish Feast of Lights - got off to a joyous start in Philadelphia yesterday with the annual lighting of the world's largest menorah. The ceremony, near the Liberty Bell on Independence Mall, included traditional music, dancing and other festivities. Hanukkah, which lasts eight days, is the Jewish commemoration of the rededication of the Temple by the Maccabees after their victory over the Syrians.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | By Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
Hanukkah, one of the most joyous of Jewish holidays, starts at sundown tonight and continues through Dec. 30. Hanukkah, the Feast of Dedication, is often erroneously called the Jewish Christmas because it is celebrated coincidentally during the Christmas season and Jews, like Christians, exchange gifts to mark the family holiday. Since the event occurred more than 100 years before Jesus Christ was born, Jewish historians believe that Jesus, as a practicing Jew, must have celebrated Hanukkah.
NEWS
December 6, 2004 | By Rabbi Deborah Bodin Cohen
I gave birth to my daughter, Arianna, on the second-to-last night of Hanukkah in 2001. Just before the orderlies took me to the delivery room, a Jewish physician came to my room and asked whether I wanted to light the Hanukkah menorah. Well, as any woman who has been in labor for 19 hours can attest, I was not in the mood to light the menorah at that moment. My husband thanked the well-meaning, if ill-timed, physician and wished him a good holiday. A few minutes later, when they wheeled me out into the hall, I saw that he had lit the menorah right outside my room.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2000 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I remember when I was the only Jewish kid in the grade school class in Omaha, and Christmas came around and the class would sing Christmas carols, and I didn't know what to do. I didn't want to be the only kid in the class who wasn't singing, and, moreover, the trouble was, I liked most of the carols. A woman I know said the way she handled it was to sing everything but the word Jesus: "The little Lord hm-hm lay down his sweet head. " Times have changed. In these more ecumenical days, we can all join in singing Christmas carols and Hanukkah songs and in celebrating Kwanzaa.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | by Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
Hanukkah wasn't celebrated in the former Soviet Union. "Back in their old country, they would celebrate the New Year. But it was a secular holiday with no religious feeling," said Olga Shraybman, coordinator of a special program for Soviet Jewish emigres at the Klein branch of the Jewish Community Centers on Red Lion and Jamison roads in the Northeast. Since the disintegration of the Soviet Union, which banned all religious observation, Soviet Jews have been emigrating at a brisk pace, and many are joining the large Jewish community in Philadelphia's Northeast section.
NEWS
December 13, 1998 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tonight, as the sky grows dark, Jews here and around the world will mark the occasion with songs, gifts, games, a few button-popping potato pancakes - and light the traditional eight-lamp candelabra, the menorah. So begins Hanukkah, the eight-day Festival of Lights. Hanukkah is, of course, the story of a miracle: Maccabean Jews, celebrating victory in battle long ago, saw fit to rededicate their temple. They had enough lamp oil to last just one day, but their lamp burned instead for eight - a sign to them that God was pleased.
NEWS
December 19, 2003 | By Ilene Munetz Pachman
My elderly father's unexpected part in my son's wedding at the Ritz-Carlton last month, reminded me of the "lasting miracle" at the center of Hanukkah. On that Saturday evening in November, in between my father's "routine" Thursday blood transfusions at Fox Chase Cancer Center, he managed to walk down the aisle beside my radiant mother - who herself walked with a cane. For his grandson's wedding, Dad, almost 89, was suddenly, blessedly strengthened. Nonetheless, I had a bed ready for him at the hotel.
NEWS
December 21, 1995 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The request lines have been ringing off the hook at local radio stations for a different kind of holiday song this season - Adam Sandler's goofy "The Hanukkah Song. " WMMR's Pierre Robert, a master at spreading musical merriment this time of year, says Sandler's silly sense of humor and the dearth of material about the Jewish holiday definitely make this one stand out. "The only other one we've come across is Pat Godwin's 'A Goishe Hanukkah,' which is about a Jewish girl going out with a Christian guy. I've been playing the two songs back to back.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 17, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Whether the miracle of the first Hanukkah is fact or legend - oil enough for just one day is said to have burned in the Temple lamps for eight - not all Jews agree. But devoutly orthodox Rabbi Abraham Shemtov believes in miracles, and why not? Forty years ago he witnessed a kind of Hanukkah miracle, right on Independence Mall. Better yet, he helped create it, and has watched it spread around the world. On Dec. 14, 1974, Shemtov and four other men of the Lubavitcher sect of Hasidic Judaism gathered on Independence Mall to light what is thought to be the first menorah, or Hanukkah candelabrum, ever illuminated on public property in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
In a swelling tide of tinsel and Bing Crosby, Hanukkah sometimes seems like a mesh bag of gold foil-wrapped afterthought. Yet the very theme of the Festival of Lights is survival, and the panoply of options for Hanukkah activities in the region demonstrates that this holiday refuses to go quietly into the fake snowy night. Here are some ways to keep the lights burning: Lighting ceremonies. Re-creating those flames that wouldn't quit, lighting ceremonies abound on the eve of the holiday on Tuesday - at sundown at Suburban Square, 6 Coulter Ave., Ardmore (information: 610-896-7560, suburbansquare.com)
NEWS
December 10, 2014
ISSUE | OBAMACARE In law's complexity, confirmation of ills Janet Trautwein of the National Association of Health Underwriters tells us that we should solicit advice from a licensed professional agent to sort out all the confusion about the health-care law ("Advice to the confused: Get an adviser," Dec. 8). So now we must not only pay an accountant to do our annual taxes, since tax law is almost too complicated for an average citizen to keep up with, but we must pay an agent to advise us on how to obtain health insurance, which will, most assuredly, also cost more.
NEWS
December 9, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was clear right at the start that these were not going to be your mother's potato pancakes. After all, how many of your mother's latkes could be described as Cajun? Or be, for that matter, a potato pancake version of the Greek spinach pie - "spanalatke" - right down to the tzatziki sauce? Yet the 3,300 latkes that were consumed by a sellout crowd of 400 men, women, and children Sunday afternoon at the Gershman Y's 12th annual Latkepalooza reflected the diversity of the cuisine of the nine restaurants - and the venerable Betty the Caterer, who accepted the invitation to participate.
FOOD
November 22, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
In modern America, Hanukkah generally overlaps with the Christmas season of gifts and parties. But this year, when the first day of Hanukkah falls on Thanksgiving Day, it bears reflecting on the commonalities of those two holidays: Indeed, both are based on a quest for freedom and both include food traditions to recall days long ago. The food traditions of Hanukkah center on oil, commemorating the story of one day's supply of oil burning for...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crescentia Motzi's floral adventure began in Hong Kong, her home until 1971, when her family emigrated to the United States. She was 14 then, already fascinated by her mother's ability to grow vegetables and flowers in a metal basket attached to the outside of their apartment. Later, as her American life unfolded - Catholic high school in Newark, N.J., and a brief stint at the University of Rochester, followed by marriage and multiple moves around the country for husband John's pharmaceutical career - Motzi worked as a secretary and administrative assistant, at one point considering a career in nursing.
NEWS
December 24, 2012
By Ellen Scolnic and Joyce Eisenberg We're Jewish. Our husbands are Jewish and our kids are Jewish. We've been Jewish for thousands of years. It's not news to us that we don't celebrate Christmas. We've never had a Christmas tree. Never cooked a holiday ham. Never strung the bushes outside our homes with colored lights. But that doesn't mean we don't enjoy yours. We love the trappings of Christmas. We are in the minority - among the 3 percent of Americans who celebrated Hanukkah.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Daniel Deagler
Like modern Israel, biblical Israel had many enemies. The average person today can conceptualize some of them - the Egyptians, for example - but based on the holy book, it's hard to distinguish among the Canaanites and Ammonites, the Hittites and Philistines. The Bible is not a history book, and certainly not one written by a disinterested third party. Enemies of the Israelites are presented as just that. But in the case of the conflict commemorated by Hanukkah, understanding the enemy involved can provide much insight.
REAL_ESTATE
December 10, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
'You shouldn't have trouble finding the house - it's pretty noticeable," Flo Weinstein tells a potential visitor, in a classic case of understatement. Indeed, the Weinstein house in Mount Laurel is visible from a distance. It's aglow with lights, mostly blue, outlining the house, trees, and shrubs, and a huge sign reads, "Happy Hanukkah. " The first reaction, typically, is, "Wow!" Flo and her husband, Robert Weinstein, are not given to understatement during this season. They are exuberant in their displays, both indoors and out, and just as passionate in their feelings about the holiday, which celebrates the Jewish miracle of rededicating the ancient Temple in Jerusalem following victory over the Syrians in 165 B.C. For Flo, that miracle, all these centuries later, is deeply personal.
NEWS
December 9, 2012 | Associated Press
JERUSALEM - Jews around the world ushered in the eight-day Hanukkah festival Saturday evening, lighting the first candles of ceremonial lamps that symbolize triumph over oppression. In Israel, families gathered after sundown for the lighting, eating traditional snacks of potato pancakes and doughnuts and exchanging gifts. Local officials lit candles set up in public places, while families displayed the nine-candle menorahs in their windows or in special windproof glass boxes outside.
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