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Hanukkah

NEWS
December 18, 1995 | YONG KIM/ DAILY NEWS
Stuart Fiel (center) and Rabbi Zalman Lipsker needed a lift to light world's largest menorah last night at the Judge Lewis Quadrangle. The event, at 5th and Market streets, across from the Liberty Bell, was in celebration of the first night of Hanukkah, the Jewish Festival of Lights
NEWS
December 23, 1997
The December dilemma for Jews is, in one sense, easier this year. Hanukkah does not begin until tonight at sundown. Jews feeling at a loss during Christmastime have something else to do on Dec. 25 than go to the movies. In another sense, the convergence of holidays makes keeping them separate that much more difficult. For unlike Christmas for Christians, Hanukkah for Jews is not a major holiday, only a lovely tribal celebration of a long-ago, come-from-behind military victory and a commemoration of the miracle that a drop of oil in an ancient dark temple could burn for eight days.
NEWS
December 6, 1999 | By Marc Schogol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As he took part in the big menorah-lighting Hanukkah ceremony for the eighth and final time, Mayor Rendell revealed yesterday that his administration almost went up in smoke before it began. To get to the top of the 30-foot-tall menorah on Arch Street, between Fifth and Sixth Streets, rabbis and dignitaries ascend in the bucket of a Peco Energy Co. cherry picker. "The first year," Rendell told those gathered for last evening's ceremonies, "there was a 45-mile-an-hour wind.
NEWS
December 28, 2011 | BY NATALIE POMPILIO, pompiln@phillynews.com215-854-2595
Most athletes train for years in hopes of accomplishing a feat worthy of the Guinness Book of World Records. The 900 teenagers poised to gain the title for most dreidels spinning at once in a single place had about 20 minutes of warm-up time before trying for the record book Wednesday in a ballroom at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown. The four-sided spinning top is part of the tradition of the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah, and there are different ways to approach the art of dreidel-spinning.
NEWS
December 5, 1996 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The story of Hanukkah, which involves a long-ago war for religious liberty, then a miracle of light, got its seasonal telling for an unusual audience yesterday: 66 students from two Philadelphia public schools. The eight-day Jewish Festival of Lights that begins today at sundown, was part of volunteer teacher Sara Goldberg's spiel at the National Museum of American Jewish History. The students were sixth-graders from Julia Masterman and fifth-graders from Robert Lamberton, visiting under a diversity program run by the Peopling of Philadelphia Collaborative.
NEWS
December 20, 1998
God does not die on the day we cease to believe . . . but we die on the day when our lives cease to be illuminated by the steady radiance, renewed daily, of . . . wonder . . . - Dag Hammarskjold, quotation for the seventh day of Hanukkah courtesy of Nancy Fuchs-Kreimer. O ye who believe! Fasting is prescribed to you as it was prescribed to those before you, that ye may learn self-restraint. - Koran 2:183, quotation for the first day of Ramadan courtesy of Anas Muhaimin, Ustaath, Quba Institute of Arabic and Islamic Studies.
FOOD
December 25, 2008 | By Jacqueline Feldman, DENVER POST
I've come to believe that God has a twisted sense of humor. A few months ago, the food editor and I were discussing my Hanukkah food column. I (loudly) proclaimed that I wanted to write about so-called "healthy" Hanukkah fare - and what bullhonky that is. "Baked latkes or latkes with Pam spray? Pshaw!" I scoffed. "We're celebrating the miracle of the oil, not the miracle of Pam. " Hanukkah, which began Sunday night and continues through Dec. 28, commemorates the restoration of the temple after the Maccabees defeated the Greek army.
FOOD
December 18, 2008 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's a simple rhyme that Jewish children chant on Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, which starts Sunday night and continues through Dec. 28: Yes, latke is Yiddish for potato pancake. But why are latkes a treat on Hanukkah - why not gefilte fish or matzo ball soup? Because Hanukkah commemorates the time when a one-day supply of oil in the Temple lamp lasted for a full eight days. Thereafter, Jews everywhere celebrated by making treats fried in oil, such as doughnuts and latkes.
NEWS
December 13, 2010
RE HOWARD Lurie's op-ed, "A Jewish View of the 'Holiday Season' ": I agree, Christmas isn't for every one. Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur aren't for everyone either, but schools and government offices are closed to recognize this holiday. It is shameful for a professor with your level of education to say that the only reason we decorate for Hanukkah is because of Christmas. Jews celebrate their holidays, Muslims have Ramadan and black people celebrate Kwanzaa. Christians have Christmas.
NEWS
December 24, 2012
By Ellen Scolnic and Joyce Eisenberg We're Jewish. Our husbands are Jewish and our kids are Jewish. We've been Jewish for thousands of years. It's not news to us that we don't celebrate Christmas. We've never had a Christmas tree. Never cooked a holiday ham. Never strung the bushes outside our homes with colored lights. But that doesn't mean we don't enjoy yours. We love the trappings of Christmas. We are in the minority - among the 3 percent of Americans who celebrated Hanukkah.
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