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Happy Fernandez

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NEWS
May 23, 2011
Happy Craven Fernandez will step down as president of Moore College of Art & Design when the class of 2012 graduates, the college announced Monday. Fernandez become the 163-year-old institution’s ninth president in 1999. Moore, the nation’s first and only arts college for women, two years ago inaugurated co-educational degree programs. Under Fernandez it also built a graduate program and two new undergraduate majors, the nation’s first in curatorial studies, and one in photography and digital arts.
NEWS
January 23, 2013
A memorial service for Happy Craven Fernandez, 74, a civic leader, activist, and college president who died Saturday, will be at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 27, at the Germantown Jewish Centre, 400 W. Ellet St., Mount Airy. A reception will follow the service, her family said Monday. Memorial donations may be made to the Public Citizens for Children and Youth by linking to: www.pccy.org/rememberinghappy or to the Children's Village by visiting: www.childrensvillagephila.org/donate .
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Happy Gladys Vivian Craven Fernandez made her name in Philadelphia in three chapters: first as an education and peace activist, then as a city councilwoman and unsuccessful candidate for mayor, and then as president of Moore College of Art & Design. Those accomplishments no doubt brought a full house to her memorial service Sunday at the Germantown Jewish Centre, but it was the stories of her faith, her love, and her foibles that brought tears and laughter to a crowd that included former Gov. Ed Rendell, Mayor Nutter, and U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz (D., Phila.)
NEWS
January 19, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Happy Craven Fernandez, 74, former Philadelphia city councilwoman, community activist and college president, died Saturday of complications from a stroke at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Dr. Fernandez underwent successful lung surgery Jan. 10, but suffered the stroke moments before being released from a hospital on Jan. 13. Her family reported Saturday that she died peacefully. "We are all so sad, but can smile when we think of the great days together and the great contributions she made over the years," her family emailed friends.Born Gladys Vivian Craven in 1939, the Omaha, Neb., native combined a folksy Midwestern nickname with her married surname to create the unforgettable moniker, Happy Fernandez.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HAPPY FERNANDEZ once had some choice advice for women brave enough to run for political office: "Keep a clear head, a big, warm heart, but have real tough layers of alligator hide. " It was hard to picture Happy Fernandez with alligator hide, but as for a clear head and big, warm heart, she was the champ. She might have been feeling the sting a little when she gave that advice in 1999, having just lost her try for mayor of Philadelphia - the first and only high-profile woman to go for that office.
NEWS
August 4, 1999 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Though she may dabble a bit in photography, Happy Fernandez was no fine-arts expert during her 18 years as a Temple University professor. Then again, it was not for her knowledge of graphic design or chiaroscuro that the board of trustees at Moore College of Art and Design tapped Fernandez to become the school's next president. As a community activist and politician, Fernandez learned a lot about how to raise money. This spring, for instance, in her unsuccessful bid to win the Democratic nomination for Philadelphia mayor, Fernandez managed to raise about $1.5 million.
NEWS
May 19, 1999 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
If nice guys finish last, where does that leave nice women? Thanks to equal rights, they finish last, too. Or near it. Happy Fernandez, the first serious female candidate for mayor of Philadelphia, likely ended her earnest political career last night with a meager showing in the Democratic primary. Speaking with the brave, stiff upper lip of a proud but defeated fighter, the former councilwoman told a thin crowd of supporters last night that at least she had played fair.
NEWS
March 17, 1999 | By Cynthia Burton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Democratic mayoral candidate Happy Fernandez isn't taking rival candidate Marty Weinberg's word that he has lived in Philadelphia long enough to be its mayor. Instead, she will try to make him prove it in court. Fernandez filed a complaint in Common Pleas Court yesterday, alleging that Weinberg hasn't lived in the city for the three years preceding Election Day, as required by the City Charter. For this race, all mayoral candidates must have lived in Philadelphia since at least November 1996.
NEWS
March 21, 1999 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marty Weinberg sent a message to his political opponents last week: Anyone who challenges him had better watch out. On Tuesday, Democratic mayoral candidate Happy Fernandez filed a lawsuit that challenged Weinberg's eligibility to run for mayor because of questions about whether he met the city's three-year residency requirement. Within 24 hours, a powerful lawyer representing Weinberg had threatened to sue Fernandez, personally, for wrongful use of the courts with a frivolous suit.
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BUSINESS
September 2, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The odds seemed monumentally against textile designer Harshita Lohia's realizing her entrepreneurial ambitions. For starters, there was her father, patriarch of a conservative Hindu family in North India, where arranged marriages are common and young women are encouraged to work on babies, not business plans. Then, when Lohia was a junior at Moore College of Art & Design, a bicyclist struck her, breaking both her hands. Five years later, fire destroyed not only her Lower Makefield home, but Lohia's entire design portfolio, putting an end to a promising job opportunity and the work visa that was to come with it. "I never felt down," she said.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
Only too happy to follow her lead As Moore College of Art & Design president, Happy Fernandez created a great legacy that will be felt for countless decades to come. The college completed a $30 million capital campaign, secured more than $3.5 million in scholarships and fellowships, and introduced coed graduate programs and two new undergraduate majors. Fernandez's commitment to the college's career-focused mission led to required internships in all majors and the funding of a unique internship fellowship for every junior.
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Happy Gladys Vivian Craven Fernandez made her name in Philadelphia in three chapters: first as an education and peace activist, then as a city councilwoman and unsuccessful candidate for mayor, and then as president of Moore College of Art & Design. Those accomplishments no doubt brought a full house to her memorial service Sunday at the Germantown Jewish Centre, but it was the stories of her faith, her love, and her foibles that brought tears and laughter to a crowd that included former Gov. Ed Rendell, Mayor Nutter, and U.S. Rep. Allyson Schwartz (D., Phila.)
NEWS
January 23, 2013
AS WE WATCHED President Obama raise his hand on the Bible and be sworn in for his second term as president - and as the first person who broke the racial barrier to the White House - we couldn't help wondering whether we'd see a woman raising her hand to the Bible in four years. There is no question that women are qualified and capable of leading a country - hello, Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, joined by 15 other women elected to heads of state. In fact the only question is why this country lags so far behind other more enlightened places - like Lithuania, Kosovo, Slovakia and Liberia.
NEWS
January 23, 2013
A memorial service for Happy Craven Fernandez, 74, a civic leader, activist, and college president who died Saturday, will be at 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 27, at the Germantown Jewish Centre, 400 W. Ellet St., Mount Airy. A reception will follow the service, her family said Monday. Memorial donations may be made to the Public Citizens for Children and Youth by linking to: www.pccy.org/rememberinghappy or to the Children's Village by visiting: www.childrensvillagephila.org/donate .
NEWS
January 23, 2013
Happy Fernandez was always civil, but never relenting in her mission to improve education and civic life in Philadelphia. A professor, college president, city councilwoman, and parents' activist, Fernandez left a mark on her adopted city. She died Saturday at age 74 at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse following a stroke. Previously, she had undergone successful lung surgery. Fernandez was the first major-party female candidate for mayor, running a strong campaign in 1999, but was unable to break through the old-boys' network of Philadelphia politics.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HAPPY FERNANDEZ once had some choice advice for women brave enough to run for political office: "Keep a clear head, a big, warm heart, but have real tough layers of alligator hide. " It was hard to picture Happy Fernandez with alligator hide, but as for a clear head and big, warm heart, she was the champ. She might have been feeling the sting a little when she gave that advice in 1999, having just lost her try for mayor of Philadelphia - the first and only high-profile woman to go for that office.
NEWS
January 21, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Happy Craven Fernandez, 74, former Philadelphia city councilwoman, community activist, and college president, died Saturday, Jan. 19, of complications from a stroke at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Dr. Fernandez underwent successful lung surgery Jan. 10, but suffered the stroke moments before being released from a hospital last Sunday. Her family reported Saturday that she died peacefully. "We are all so sad, but can smile when we think of the great days together and the great contributions she made over the years," her family wrote in an e-mail to friends.
NEWS
November 20, 2011 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Signe Wilkinson can't help but sketch. She stands at her tilted drawing board, which is illuminated by a spotlight, and answers questions as her hand purposefully glides over the paper. She's talking about her new comic strip, Penn's Place , which debuts Sunday in The Inquirer. It is set in Philadelphia, on a fictional city block, where main character Hannah Penn has recently moved. "It's a block that no one actually knows, but everyone will have felt like they've passed it, in one way or another," Wilkinson says.
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