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Hard Labor

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NEWS
April 21, 1988 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beside the grassy banks of the muddy Mahaweli River, the crocodiles vanish in silent submersions when the local elephants are taken for their midday baths. As the sun passes through the white sky, the lean mahouts, barefoot and dressed only in loose-fitting sarongs, shout at beasts 100 times their size and strength, "Mahaida," "Daha," yelling at the animals to come and go in a language that only the elephants and their drivers understand. N. Muthubanda was 18 when he became a mahout 32 years ago. He started working with elephants because he could find no other job. Now, he works with a mild-tempered female named Nona who towers over him and sometimes affectionately nudges his cheek with her trunk.
NEWS
September 6, 1989 | BY MIKE ROYKO
A guy from a radio station called and said he was doing a Labor Day feature. He wanted to know what the worst job was I'd ever had. I was busy, so I quickly told him the worst job I ever had was answering questions from radio stations. But after we hung up, I started thinking about the question. What was the toughest thing I ever did to earn a buck? When I was a kid, I set pins in bowling alleys, which was hard, tedious labor. But it was good exercise, gave me walking-around money.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Eric Talmadge, Associated Press
TOKYO - An American imprisoned in North Korea has told a pro-Pyongyang media outlet that he wants the United States to "try harder" to help him gain amnesty from a sentence of 15 years of hard labor for alleged crimes against the government. In what appears to be his first media interview since his November arrest, Kenneth Bae told the Tokyo-based Choson Sinbo in an article published Wednesday that he had hoped to be out by Thursday. That was not only Independence Day but his father's 70th birthday.
NEWS
February 21, 2010 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
First of two parts. He was one of the first great chefs of Philadelphia - in fact, of the young nation. The chief cook in President George Washington's home here in 1790 had only one name: Hercules. In the mansion's open-hearth kitchen, where elaborate banquets were prepared, where spitted meats sizzled and "fricaseys" simmered in cast-iron pans over hickory fires, underlings scurried to execute the orders of Hercules, "the great master-spirit," according to one account, who seemed to be everywhere at once.
NEWS
November 21, 1995 | BY MICHAEL BUSLER
When the results of the congressional election held last November were tabulated, something occurred that we hadn't seen since the 1950s: The Republican Party had gained control of both houses of Congress. Was this a one-time phenomenon or the beginning of a trend? At the time, most political analysts believed the public had accepted the view that big government was costly, wasteful and counterproductive. The new Congress presented a contractual obligation to reduce the size of government, both in terms of the number of programs and in terms of dollars spent.
NEWS
November 19, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Sheik Omar Abdel-Rahman, the spiritual leader of Egypt's militant Al-Gamaa al-Islamiya, also known as the Islamic Group, is incarcerated at a special hospital for federal prisoners in Springfield, Mo. Abdel-Rahman, 59, who is blind and suffers from diabetes and high blood pressure, was sentenced last year to life in prison without parole after being convicted in New York of involvement in a conspiracy that planned the 1993 World Trade Center bombing,...
NEWS
August 15, 1998 | by Virginia Lam, Daily News Staff Writer
Summer vacation usually means memories of beach heroics and bad sunburns. But for 19-year-old Michele Keegan, of Hamilton Township, N.J., summer brought the risk of five years' hard labor in jail and, ultimately, deportation from a small Southeast Asian country. What a vacation! Keegan and 17 others were found guilty of distributing pro-democracy leaflets in Myanmar. The country formerly known as Burma is under military rule and has for years been criticzed by some international human-rights groups.
NEWS
August 7, 1995 | By Annick Doeff
As the only nation to be attacked with an atomic bomb, Japan is entitled to a leadership role in the crusade against the dangers of nuclear arms. However, its authority is seriously compromised by its reluctance to take its responsibility for its deeds during World War II. Japan, in contrast to Germany, has neither acknowledged its crimes nor paid restitution to its victims. During my internment in Japanese concentration camps in the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia), humiliation - a Japanese specialty - was the order of the day. No eye contact with the master race was allowed.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
The obits for North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il are filled with details about his weird personal habits and his country's nukes, but the history books will reveal him as one of the great mass murderers of our times. One of my most chilling journalistic experiences came in 2004 in South Korea, when I was interviewing a handful of North Koreans who had managed to escape to Seoul, and listening to the horrors they'd endured in their home country. Only a few thousand North Koreans have made it out, and they bear witness to the terrible suffering that Kim and his father, Kim Il Sung, inflicted on the North Korean population.
NEWS
November 29, 2009 | By Olivia Biagi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The William Way LGBT Community Center is telling one of the Holocaust's least-known stories - the Nazi persecution of homosexuals. It's a story of men and women who were arrested and often sentenced to hard labor for what were called indecent acts. The victims were mostly men. Some faced judicial proceedings and criminal charges. Others were simply picked up by SS officers and locked away in concentration camps. Through Friday, the center is displaying "Nazi Persecution of Homosexuals: 1933-1945," a traveling exhibition of 32 large panels featuring reproductions of historic photographs and documents.
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NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Eric Talmadge, Associated Press
TOKYO - An American imprisoned in North Korea has told a pro-Pyongyang media outlet that he wants the United States to "try harder" to help him gain amnesty from a sentence of 15 years of hard labor for alleged crimes against the government. In what appears to be his first media interview since his November arrest, Kenneth Bae told the Tokyo-based Choson Sinbo in an article published Wednesday that he had hoped to be out by Thursday. That was not only Independence Day but his father's 70th birthday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2013 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
He's long been known as "Wayne the Train" - a fitting nickname for such a throwback - but these days Wayne Hancock has a new passion when it comes to wheels - motorcycles. "I've been riding for about five years now," the don't-call-him-country singer and songwriter says from his home in Denton, Texas. It's therapy, of sorts. He and his wife are separated, he says: "It gives some balance to my life now, so when I get home [from touring] I'm busy," he explains. "It helps keep my head clear.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
The obits for North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il are filled with details about his weird personal habits and his country's nukes, but the history books will reveal him as one of the great mass murderers of our times. One of my most chilling journalistic experiences came in 2004 in South Korea, when I was interviewing a handful of North Koreans who had managed to escape to Seoul, and listening to the horrors they'd endured in their home country. Only a few thousand North Koreans have made it out, and they bear witness to the terrible suffering that Kim and his father, Kim Il Sung, inflicted on the North Korean population.
SPORTS
December 28, 2010 | By BERNARD FERNANDEZ, fernanb@phillynews.com
There are several ways for a coach to prepare his team for a bowl game. He can play the role of warden, closely monitoring the players' movements, restricting them to the team's practice facility and hotel while treating the entire experience as a week or more to be spent at hard labor since, obviously, the objective is to win, not to have fun. The other extreme is to turn your kids loose, to let them enjoy the sights and sounds of the area and to...
NEWS
April 7, 2010
OUR SOCIETY is continually in denial about how the crime being perpetuated by our youth has affected us over recent decades. It reflects the exponential growth in teen parents since the early '90s. From these undereducated, illiterate parents come the truant, ignorant, belligerent, insolent, dumb scofflaws and criminals who we now see mugging and maiming innocent people on the streets. Poor parenting, and not so much poverty, as some may believe, is the root cause of these behaviors.
NEWS
February 21, 2010 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
He was one of the first great chefs of Philadelphia - in fact, of the young nation. The chief cook in President George Washington's home here in 1790 had only one name: Hercules. In the mansion's open-hearth kitchen, where elaborate banquets were prepared, where spitted meats sizzled and "fricaseys" simmered in cast-iron pans over hickory fires, underlings scurried to execute the orders of Hercules, "the great master-spirit," according to one account, who seemed to be everywhere at once.
NEWS
November 29, 2009 | By Olivia Biagi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The William Way LGBT Community Center is telling one of the Holocaust's least-known stories - the Nazi persecution of homosexuals. It's a story of men and women who were arrested and often sentenced to hard labor for what were called indecent acts. The victims were mostly men. Some faced judicial proceedings and criminal charges. Others were simply picked up by SS officers and locked away in concentration camps. Through Friday, the center is displaying "Nazi Persecution of Homosexuals: 1933-1945," a traveling exhibition of 32 large panels featuring reproductions of historic photographs and documents.
NEWS
November 23, 2004 | By MARY T. SHAW
AS THE Thanksgiving holiday approaches, our minds wander to idyllic images of Pilgrims and Indians peacefully sharing a feast in celebration of the fall harvest. On Thursday, as we break bread with family and friends, let us take some time to reflect on the fate of Native Americans in the centuries that followed the first Thanksgiving. This nation was founded on the principles of inalienable human rights and civil liberties. It would appear, however, that at first those guarantees applied only to those fortunate enough to have been born white European-Americans.
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