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Hard Liquor

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NEWS
April 26, 2011 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - From the same folks who brought you wines in supermarket vending machines comes this new offering: Bourbon with your bath soap. Gin with your gouda. Vodka with your vegetables. Within the next few weeks, the state Liquor Control Board plans to begin stocking a select few of its so-called wine kiosks in supermarkets across the state with a few bottles of hard liquor as well. The inclusion of spirits comes as the agency aims to give the consumer more convenience and better selection.
NEWS
December 9, 1987 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University opened the door for the sale of hard liquor on its North Philadelphia campus under a measure narrowly approved by the university's board of trustees yesterday. In a 10-9 vote, the board agreed to let the Irish Pub serve liquor at a new establishment it hopes to open in leased space on the Temple campus sometime next year. Temple President Peter J. Liacouras, whose vote in favor of the measure broke a deadlock in the board vote, said the plan would move forward only if Temple could negotiate a lease with the Irish Pub, which has been operating two taprooms in Center City and one in Atlantic City.
NEWS
June 30, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The Republican-controlled legislature on Sunday began fast-tracking yet another budget proposal that Gov. Wolf has said he will not support: privatizing the state-run liquor stores. The measure, introduced Sunday evening by GOP senators, would allow beer distributors, bars, restaurants, grocery stores, and others to sell for takeout wine and hard liquor, which now can be purchased only at one of the state's wine and spirits stores. The proposal, which passed a key Senate committee, also calls for leasing the wholesale operations of the state Liquor Control Board.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1997 | By Jodi Enda, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Saying that "liquor has no business with kids," President Clinton yesterday appealed to hard-liquor companies to stop advertising on television and called for a study to determine whether the ads prompt children to drink. It is time, Clinton said, to "move urgently to save parents, young people, and our nation from the unavoidable bad consequences of liquor advertising on television. " But the President stopped short of advocating a mandatory ban on liquor ads. And he declined to criticize beer and wine companies, which have flooded the airwaves with commercials.
NEWS
April 1, 2002
POLITICIANS AND professional alarmists went nuts recently when NBC broke what had been a 50-year voluntary ban on advertising hard liquor. They claimed the ads would encourage kids to drink, and tempt recovering alcoholics to jump off the wagon. The network was forced to back off. But tune in to a televised sports event, and you'll see advertisements for spiked soda pops called Smirnoff Ice or Bacardi Silver - geared obviously at the youngest of legal (and illegal) drinkers. The drinks - called "malternatives" - mask the taste of the 5 percent alcohol they include so completely, they could more accurately be termed an "alcohol delivery system.
NEWS
December 19, 2001 | By Claude Lewis
It always starts out the same way. Somebody gets a bright idea to change things - "just a little" - and before you know it, whammo! everything's different. NBC broke a longtime TV taboo last week when it became the first network in decades to air liquor commercials. NBC argued that the 50-year-old self-imposed ban on advertisements for hard liquor on network television is simply outdated. But nothing reflects being outdated so much as declining revenues. The simple truth is that television advertising is suffering from a huge hangover brought on by one of the worst TV advertising markets in recent memory.
NEWS
December 14, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
HARRISBURG - The options in Pennsylvania for people to buy wine and beer from private retailers would expand and the state-controlled liquor stores would remain open under a bill approved yesterday by a state House panel. But the bill represents a radical departure from the objectives of the House Republican floor leader and of Republican Gov. Tom Corbett to close the state stores and auction wine- and liquor-sales licenses to private operators. Prospects for the bill are not clear in the full House, and a raft of proposed amendments was expected to emerge on a topic that has proven to be complicated for the Legislature.
NEWS
September 30, 1996 | BY JAMES HANAK
Without using statistics - only common sense - I would like to suggest why it is wrong for the state Legislature to privatize the sale of hard liquor. One of the biggest problems in our country is underage drinking. DARE programs in the public schools, well publicized drunken orgies in fraternities and sororities, and increased awareness of "date rape" remind us daily of the problem. Now Mothers Against Drunk Driving is trying to get Bud Frogs off the air because they have become the beer industry's "Joe Camel" for children.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Steve and Mia
Q : I FEEL LIKE I'm drinking too much. I want to go to rehab and stop drinking all together. I have expressed this to my family, but they say that because I never drink when I have to work or when the family is in crisis, that my problem is not a problem. For the record, I drink between eight and 12 shots of hard liquor daily and have been doing this for about five years. I do stop occasionally. I've even gone six days without a drink without going through any form of withdrawal symptoms.
NEWS
June 6, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis and INQUIRER Harrisburg bureau
HARRIBURG — In what some are calling a setback for privatizing the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board, the union representing state wine and liquor stores has ratified a new four-year contract that appears to require private business in the liquor business to hire displaced LCB workers — and give them the same salary and benefits. The new contract between the state and members of two United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) locals representing 3,500 people in the state's wine and spirits stores would, among other things, seemingly obligate any employer that sells wine and hard liquor — including a private business — to adopt all the terms and obligations of the contract.
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NEWS
June 30, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The Republican-controlled legislature on Sunday began fast-tracking yet another budget proposal that Gov. Wolf has said he will not support: privatizing the state-run liquor stores. The measure, introduced Sunday evening by GOP senators, would allow beer distributors, bars, restaurants, grocery stores, and others to sell for takeout wine and hard liquor, which now can be purchased only at one of the state's wine and spirits stores. The proposal, which passed a key Senate committee, also calls for leasing the wholesale operations of the state Liquor Control Board.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Steve and Mia
Q : I FEEL LIKE I'm drinking too much. I want to go to rehab and stop drinking all together. I have expressed this to my family, but they say that because I never drink when I have to work or when the family is in crisis, that my problem is not a problem. For the record, I drink between eight and 12 shots of hard liquor daily and have been doing this for about five years. I do stop occasionally. I've even gone six days without a drink without going through any form of withdrawal symptoms.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
W INE, LIQUOR, Beer, Champagne is painted in big, red letters at the entrance. Inside the dingy, glass front door of Stop 'n Shop Discount Liquors on the Admiral Wilson Boulevard, a wall is plastered with alcohol ads featuring women in thong bikinis and hot pants. Business is good, said manager Tom Prom, 32. But being open seven days a week until 10 p.m. in a scruffy section of Pennsauken, Camden County, requires precautions. Someone on staff is always armed and security cameras and monitors record just about every square foot inside and outside the store, he said.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis and Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A day that began with a ray of promise for the Corbett administration's big policy initiatives ended with accusations, recriminations, and seemingly no resolution in sight. The state House of Representatives abruptly adjourned around 8 p.m. Saturday without getting to a widely expected debate on a bill that would raise billions of dollars for roads, bridges, and mass transit, including SEPTA. Soon after, the chamber announced it was taking the unusual step of scheduling voting sessions for Monday and Tuesday - after the midnight Sunday budget deadline.
NEWS
June 30, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - All signs pointed to a frantic weekend in the Capitol as Gov. Corbett and the Republican-controlled legislature raced to meet the deadline to pass a state budget by midnight Sunday, as well as strike a compromise on the governor's three key initiatives - and perhaps help Philadelphia with its school funding crisis, as well. By early Saturday, no deal had been struck on any of the so-called Big Three: privatizing the sale of wine and hard liquor; funding roads, bridges, and mass transit; and reining in public-employee pension costs.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
TUMWATER, Wash. - Lisa Jones, a bank teller, received a rude awakening after she and other Washingtonians voted to dismantle their state's liquor system. The first bottle of gin she bought at a supermarket had a cheap shelf price - until taxes at the register added $7. But, a year later, the appeal of one-stop shopping has her hooked. "I actually think I end up buying liquor more often," said Jones, putting a bottle of Burnett's gin in her basket with the cat food, cereal, and frozen fries as she and her 13-year-old son wandered the aisles of a cavernous Fred Meyer superstore.
NEWS
June 6, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis and INQUIRER Harrisburg bureau
HARRIBURG — In what some are calling a setback for privatizing the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board, the union representing state wine and liquor stores has ratified a new four-year contract that appears to require private business in the liquor business to hire displaced LCB workers — and give them the same salary and benefits. The new contract between the state and members of two United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) locals representing 3,500 people in the state's wine and spirits stores would, among other things, seemingly obligate any employer that sells wine and hard liquor — including a private business — to adopt all the terms and obligations of the contract.
NEWS
December 14, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
HARRISBURG - The options in Pennsylvania for people to buy wine and beer from private retailers would expand and the state-controlled liquor stores would remain open under a bill approved yesterday by a state House panel. But the bill represents a radical departure from the objectives of the House Republican floor leader and of Republican Gov. Tom Corbett to close the state stores and auction wine- and liquor-sales licenses to private operators. Prospects for the bill are not clear in the full House, and a raft of proposed amendments was expected to emerge on a topic that has proven to be complicated for the Legislature.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2011
Q: For the first 40 years of my life, I rarely drank. Then I had a really bad day about four years ago, and I decided to have a couple of shots of tequila to reduce my agitation. Well it worked, and it also made me very horny. I started making it a nightly ritual. Over the next three years, I slowly increased the amount of alcohol I drank to maintain the effect. When I hit eight shots a night, I realized this might be a problem and started cutting back. Over the next year, I reduced the number of shots to two, then changed what I was drinking.
NEWS
April 26, 2011 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - From the same folks who brought you wines in supermarket vending machines comes this new offering: Bourbon with your bath soap. Gin with your gouda. Vodka with your vegetables. Within the next few weeks, the state Liquor Control Board plans to begin stocking a select few of its so-called wine kiosks in supermarkets across the state with a few bottles of hard liquor as well. The inclusion of spirits comes as the agency aims to give the consumer more convenience and better selection.
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