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Harlem Nights

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1989 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
This has been quite a year for filmmakers who write, direct and star in their own movies - Spike Lee, Woody Allen, and oh yeah, Yahoo Serious. Now comes Eddie Murphy, the megastar who has all the most important jobs in the new picture "Harlem Nights," and adds the title of executive producer to boot. How does he measure up? Well, based on "Harlem Nights," a caper flick about gangsters in 1938 Harlem, Murphy will rate somewhere behind Yahoo Serious. Dead last, that is. Murphy's film is limp, predictable and unimaginative drama relieved only by the occasionaly amusing - and always profane - scenes involving Murphy and co- stars Richard Pryor and Redd Foxx.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1989 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Eddie Murphy's new movie Harlem Nights, she is exotic Creole beauty Dominique LaRue, a gangster's mistress with a heart of steel. In NBC's popular black college sitcom A Different World, she is prudish snob Whitley Gilbert, the Southern belle daughter of black aristocracy. In Spike Lee's School Daze, she is a wannabe - a light-skinned black in blue contact lenses who believes that her complexion elevates her above her darker-skinned sisters. But in her dressing room at MTM Studios, a few days before Harlem Nights was to open nationally, Jasmine Guy was just a home girl.
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In Harlem Nights, the much-touted three generations of black comics are reduced to much-repeated four-letter words. The film brims with the expletives-never-deleted vulgarity of an Eddie Murphy concert without being nearly as funny. As the dialogue, penned by Murphy, drags into yet another scene of strident four-letter - not to mention 10-letter - cursing, it becomes obvious that what we have here is not just pointless bad language, but bad writing. Having somebody swear is a lot easier than having him say something revelatory.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1989 | The New York Daily News and Associated Press contributed to this report
SACKED STARLET SUES EDDIE What's wrong with Eddie Murphy? One of the richest and most eligible bachelors, and he fires a poor, fledgling actress because she declines to do the Wild Thing? How tacky. Just how tacky is now up to the courts to decide. The alleged wronged, Michael Michele, filed a $75 million breach-of-contract suit against Mr. Heh! Heh! Heh! after he released her from his "Harlem Nights" flick. The suit claims that "Murphy made consistent, personal overtures" that "became more and more aggressive, including attempts by Murphy to fondle and otherwise caress her. " The suit states that "on April 7, when it became clear to Murphy that she would not accede to his sexual demands, Murphy had her discharged.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1991 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eddie Murphy is back in front of the cameras - and, thankfully, only in front - for Boomerang, now under way in Manhattan. (Who can forget the Murphy- directed Harlem Nights?) In the Paramount production, due out next summer, Murphy plays a Casanova who comes up against Robin Givens - the only woman ever to reject his overtures. Halle Berry (Strictly Business) and the Amazonian Grace Jones co- star. And sibs Warrington and Reginald Hudlin, who produced and directed the hit House Party, are performing the same services again.
NEWS
July 21, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
In 1992, the voice of the new black cinema has been dominated by the comedians who played a largely unheralded role in helping to start the movement. Most of the talk surrounding the recent surge in African-American movies has focused on a relatively new commodity in the film industry - black directors who learned their trade at universities, rather than strictly on the job. Film school grads like Spike Lee ("Do the Right Thing," "Jungle Fever") and John Singleton ("Boyz N the Hood")
SPORTS
June 21, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
JUST BEFORE the festivities got underway last night inside Union Transfer, site of the third annual "Harlem Nights" event, Jimmy and Johari Rollins were asked a potentially dangerous question: Which Rollins was the better dancer? "That's a good question," Jimmy Rollins said, laughing. OK, let's get this thing solved: Do either of you have a signature move? "He does," Johari Rollins said. "It'll probably get the night started. " The Rollins were dressed to the nines. They could have walked right into the cast of "The Great Gatsby.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic The Hollywood Reporter contributed to this column
The Phantom is about to become a movie reality. Although musicals tend to be massively expensive to film and are by no means assured of success when they make the transition from the stage, Warner Bros. thinks it has a sure thing in The Phantom of the Opera. The most spectacular musical failures of recent memory were Richard Attenborough's version of A Chorus Line, which has just ended its record- setting Broadway run, and John Huston's disinterested go at Annie. Both these supposedly sure-fire commercial properties fizzled and fell far below their studios' expectations.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1989 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The last time John Travolta was part of a major box office smash, he was wearing a leisure suit. So were a lot of people - it was the 1970s. Who would've figured that disco guy Travolta - shell-shocked for years by the concussion of his own bombs - would emerge more than a decade later as the star of a runaway hit? No one. So he can't possibly be the reason "Look Who's Talking" is the surprise box office phenomenon of 1989. And yet something is at work here. The movie raked in another $11.4 million last weekend, making it the nation's top box office attraction for the fifth straight week and pushing its total gross to more than $74 million.
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SPORTS
June 21, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
JUST BEFORE the festivities got underway last night inside Union Transfer, site of the third annual "Harlem Nights" event, Jimmy and Johari Rollins were asked a potentially dangerous question: Which Rollins was the better dancer? "That's a good question," Jimmy Rollins said, laughing. OK, let's get this thing solved: Do either of you have a signature move? "He does," Johari Rollins said. "It'll probably get the night started. " The Rollins were dressed to the nines. They could have walked right into the cast of "The Great Gatsby.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1996 | By Cindy Pearlman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Eddie Murphy isn't making a comeback. Pacing in a corridor in the Ritz-Carlton Hotel prior to a press conference, looking trim and sleek in a black, short-sleeved sweater and tailored pants, he wants to make that perfectly clear. Others may consider his new film - a remake of Jerry Lewis' The Nutty Professor, opening Friday - a comeback attempt after a series of less-than-sensational movies. Murphy isn't buying it. "I don't think I ever left," he says. "I used to flip burgers at McDonald's.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"The Distinguished Gentleman" is not the most sophisticated political satire in screen history. A congressman jokes about being referred to as a "member," and there are many snickering references to the name "Dick. " Eddie Murphy - cast as a con man who ends up in Congress - makes leering remarks about the "ins and outs" of politics while chatting with a pretty female lobbyist, and engages in an impromptu spray battle with another congressman in front of a urinal. The plot is about as refined.
NEWS
July 21, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
In 1992, the voice of the new black cinema has been dominated by the comedians who played a largely unheralded role in helping to start the movement. Most of the talk surrounding the recent surge in African-American movies has focused on a relatively new commodity in the film industry - black directors who learned their trade at universities, rather than strictly on the job. Film school grads like Spike Lee ("Do the Right Thing," "Jungle Fever") and John Singleton ("Boyz N the Hood")
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1991 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eddie Murphy is back in front of the cameras - and, thankfully, only in front - for Boomerang, now under way in Manhattan. (Who can forget the Murphy- directed Harlem Nights?) In the Paramount production, due out next summer, Murphy plays a Casanova who comes up against Robin Givens - the only woman ever to reject his overtures. Halle Berry (Strictly Business) and the Amazonian Grace Jones co- star. And sibs Warrington and Reginald Hudlin, who produced and directed the hit House Party, are performing the same services again.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1990 | The Washington Post, USA Today, New York Daily News, New York Post, Reuters and the Associated Press contributed to this report
MADONNA RUNS AWAY FROM CHARITY CASE Of all the nerve. Pop tart Madonna turned down an invitation to help launch a charity record for Romanian orphans yesterday because she had something more important to do - like jogging in Hyde Park. Olivia Harrison, chairwoman of the Romanian Angel Appeal, invited Madonna to join her husband - who only happens to be former Beatle George Harrison - and his fellow ex-Beatle Ringo Starr at a Hyde Park Hotel luncheon to introduce the record "Nobody's Child.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic The Hollywood Reporter contributed to this column
The Phantom is about to become a movie reality. Although musicals tend to be massively expensive to film and are by no means assured of success when they make the transition from the stage, Warner Bros. thinks it has a sure thing in The Phantom of the Opera. The most spectacular musical failures of recent memory were Richard Attenborough's version of A Chorus Line, which has just ended its record- setting Broadway run, and John Huston's disinterested go at Annie. Both these supposedly sure-fire commercial properties fizzled and fell far below their studios' expectations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1990 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A charming return to form for Disney, an influential horror film from the early '60s and the latest effort from Eddie Murphy top this week's list of new home videos. THE LITTLE MERMAID (1989) (Walt Disney) $26.99. 83 minutes. It's been five years since a mermaid made a splash to match this splendid piece of work from the Disney studio. Although the tough ending of the Hans Christian Andersen story is toned down, the themes and messages about tolerance and independence are presented without cuteness in a film that brims with innovation and imagination.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | The Inquirer Staff Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, Reuters and the Knight-Ridder News Service
A Newark, N.J., city councilman's aide who says comedian Eddie Murphy ripped off the idea for the movie Harlem Nights has a criminal record that includes convictions for fraud, drug possession and theft, according to a Newark newspaper report. Hafiz Farid, 37, sued Murphy earlier this month. Farid, whose given name is Darryl Anderson, served time in federal prisons in Danbury, Conn., and Morgantown, W. Va., for two offenses, including a scheme to steal tens of thousands of dollars from federal student loan programs, according to the report.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1989 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Eddie Murphy's new movie Harlem Nights, she is exotic Creole beauty Dominique LaRue, a gangster's mistress with a heart of steel. In NBC's popular black college sitcom A Different World, she is prudish snob Whitley Gilbert, the Southern belle daughter of black aristocracy. In Spike Lee's School Daze, she is a wannabe - a light-skinned black in blue contact lenses who believes that her complexion elevates her above her darker-skinned sisters. But in her dressing room at MTM Studios, a few days before Harlem Nights was to open nationally, Jasmine Guy was just a home girl.
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