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Harlem Renaissance

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1990 | By Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
"The wind came back with triple fury, and put out the light for the last time. They sat in company with the others in other shanties, their eyes straining agaist crude walls and their souls asking if He meant to measure their puny might against His. They seemed to be staring at the dark, but their eyes were watching God. " - Zora Neale Hurston "Their Eyes Were Watching God (1937) At first, she would probably laugh at her own resurrection and all its attendant hullabaloo.
NEWS
May 1, 2000 | By Kitty Semisch
More than any others, W.E.B. DuBois and Charles S. Johnson helped bring to light an entirely new African American literary voice. DuBois edited Crisis, official magazine for the NAACP, from 1910 to 1934; Johnson edited Opportunity, the Urban League magazine, from 1923 to 1928. Both periodicals published original literature and literary criticism. Both were seminal publications in the Harlem Renaissance. Both editors had strong - and very different - ideas about how the unfolding of black literary identity was to proceed.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1990 | By Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
"My People! My People! a whole buncha lies by and about Zora Neale Hurston" is a play title that the subject, Hurston herself, would have loved. This feisty, irreverent black woman managed to carve out a remarkable place for herself in the first half of this century as a folklorist, collecting black traditional tales, and as a novelist associated with the Harlem Renaissance. Hurston got into plenty of scrapes along the way, but never lost her sense of humor. She is ripe, overripe actually, for serious attention and great stuff for the theater.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | By Bruce Britt, Los Angeles Daily News
Manhattan is infested with ghosts. Much of this town's turn-of-the-century architecture still stands, and the resulting old-American atmosphere hurls visitors back to a time when immigrants huddled in the streets, residents toiled in sweatshops, and a sizzling new sound called jazz captured the city's imagination. Perhaps no neighborhood within Manhattan's massive borders is as haunted as Harlem. From the 1920s to the late 1950s, this celebrated section of New York City was the theater for America's most astounding black artistic movement, a period known as the Harlem Renaissance.
NEWS
October 12, 1995 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jacob Lawrence, who recently celebrated his 78th birthday, earned his enduring reputation as a painter amid the creative ferment of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1930s. Considered by some the most renowned African American artist living today, he is represented with works in some of the world's major collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, London's National Gallery of Art, and the Vatican Museum. Yet yesterday, he encouraged students at West Chester University to consider their own "life experiences" as exciting as his. "Harlem was a very small community when I was a student," Lawrence said to a large crowd.
NEWS
May 8, 1991 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Fates have been good to painter Jacob Lawrence. As a wide-eyed boy growing up during the Depression, he managed to take art classes. As a quiet young man, he kept company with some of the literary and artistic giants of the Harlem Renaissance. As an emerging artist, he was sought after by one of New York's premier art galleries. Today, art historians consider him a master of 20th-century American painting. Over a half-century, Lawrence has gained such recognition by force of his considerable talent: a simple yet powerful style that speaks to most everyone about humanity.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1995 | By Nicholas A. Basbanes, FOR THE INQUIRER
At 87, Dorothy West is enjoying all the attention she has been getting lately, not only because she has published her first novel in 47 years, but also for being honored as the lone survivor of the Harlem Renaissance, an artistic phenomenon that flourished in the 1920s and '30s. "The first time I realized that I was the last one from that group still alive was at a dinner they gave for me a while back at Radcliffe College," West said in an interview this month at her modest home on the island of Martha's Vineyard.
NEWS
February 16, 2000 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
During this Black History Month, Christine M. Hill, a writer of children's books, is visiting libraries and talking about her first book, Langston Hughes: Poet of the Harlem Renaissance. Hill, a Cinnaminson resident, is giving a 45-minute presentation titled "Langston and Me" in Burlington and Gloucester Counties. "I've always enjoyed writing, but until a book publisher approached me about writing a book for a children's-book series on African American historical figures, I hadn't had anything published," said Hill, who has been the children's librarian at the Willingboro Public Library for 10 years now. She decided to write about Hughes, she said, because "he is my favorite poet.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2000 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Before I was an African American, I was a black kid living in Los Angeles who wanted to be a rock 'n' roll star," Shawn Amos writes. "Then I discovered Harlem, and, ever since, I've wanted to be a Negro. To be Negro in 1921 Harlem meant living in the epicenter of cool. " It's not often that an African American under 70 refers to himself as a Negro. But Amos, producer of the four-disc Rhapsodies in Black: Music and Words From the Harlem Renaissance (Rhino), does so out of reverence for the "New Negroes," whose brilliance defined the 20th century's most exhilarating period of achievement by African Americans in the arts.
NEWS
July 18, 1998 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Henrik Clarke, 83, a leading African American historian and scholar, died of a heart attack Thursday at St. Luke's Hospital in New York. An activist as well as a scholar, Mr. Clarke was once a confidant of Malcolm X and an adviser to Kwame Nkrumah, the first president of Ghana. He was a leading proponent of the Afrocentric view of history and culture. Though he never graduated from high school, Mr. Clarke became an authority on African history and culture. He is perhaps best known as a leader in the development of curricula for African American studies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2012 | Molly Eichel
Forty films in four days are a lot to sift through. So here are our must-see picks for the BlackStar Film Festival. (Admission is $8, $5 students.)   " Brooklyn Boheme ": Nelson George and Diane Paragas look back at the African-American artistic community in 1980s Brooklyn, N.Y. — specifically the Fort Greene and Clinton Hill neighborhoods — that filmmaker Spike Lee equates to the Harlem Renaissance. The scene birthed Mos Def, Erykah Badu, Rosie Perez, poet Saul Williams, Chris Rock and more.
NEWS
October 29, 2011
Delaware Park Entries, Nov. 1 POST TIME: 1:15PM 1st - $17,000, Maiden cl, $15,000-$12,500, 2YO, 1M&70yds 1 Risk On (J Santiago) 118 7/2 2 Scatter Creek (S Gonzalez) 121 8/1 3 Brimstone Island (R Napravnik) 121 9/5 4 Fastest James (R Santana, Jr.) 121 5/2 5 Woods Hole (E Jurado) 113 6/1 6 Surprise Buddy (A Castellano, Jr.) 121 8/1 2d - $18,000, cl, $15,000-$12,500, 3YO&UP, F & M, 5F 1 Dakota Sis (A Castellano, Jr.)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2010
IN A magnificently restored, four-story brownstone in Harlem, N.Y., the Mount Morris Park Community Improvement Association was hosting a wine-tasting social to help fund one of the organization's numerous projects. Homeowner Russell Nance explained to his guests how new wood had been matched with hundred-year-old molding, and the kitchen redesigned and moved to the center of the home during a two-year renovation. "It just seemed natural to relocate it here from the rear of the house, since the kitchen is where people always seem to congregate," Nance said.
NEWS
February 5, 2009 | Reviewed by Carlin Romano, Inquirer Book Critic
Alain L. Locke The Biography of a Philosopher By Leonard Harris and Charles Molesworth University of Chicago Press. 432 pp. $45 When Philadelphia-born Alain L. Locke (1885-1954), the first African American to win a Rhodes Scholarship, wrote home to his mother shortly after beginning undergraduate life at Harvard, he didn't exactly express solidarity with his few black student peers. According to Leonard Harris and Charles Molesworth in their superb, eye-opening biography of the man they call "the most influential African American intellectual born between W.E.B.
NEWS
December 10, 2007 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
The line that turns up again and again in Ain't Misbehavin' is, "One never knows, do one?" Good to keep in mind as you sit through Act 1, wondering why the show - chock full of great Fats Waller songs - seems so flat. They sing "The Joint Is Jumpin'" but it's not. And then, in Act 2, the show leaps into life and everybody at the Prince Music Theater starts having a much better time. So, true enough: One never knows. Fats Waller wrote and/or recorded the show's tunes during the Harlem Renaissance in the '20s and '30s.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Idle it is not. Wild it is most assuredly. Set in Prohibition-era Georgia, Idlewild boasts yesterday's style, today's music, and the Harlem Renaissance's romanticism. A hip-hop musical that might be dubbed Moulin Noir or Under the Peachtree Moon, it was conceived for and stars OutKast duo Andr? Benjamin and Antwan A. Patton (better known as Andr? 3000 and Big Boi). They are, as might be expected, terrific in the musical numbers and painfully self-conscious in the dramatic sequences.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2006 | By Gene D'Alessandro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Please Touch Museum will morph into a cool jazz club for the monthlong Junior Jazz Festival. Little ones can paint to blues music, strap on taps for tap dancing, and strum or blow on all variety of instruments. Designed to introduce youngsters to America's homemade music, the festival brings live music, dance and theater to the museum. Chicago singer-songwriter Erin Flynn is booked at three area venues this weekend - including a day of performances at Junior Jazz on Sunday.
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In 1936, Jean Toomer, a little-known writer, purchased a farm near Doylestown. Thirty years later when he died, an invalid and a recluse, some of his former friends and colleagues were surprised. Because he had dropped out of sight and was unpublished for almost three decades, they assumed he had died earlier. Today, literary historians consider Toomer one of the great writers to come out of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. And his book, Cane, ranks alongside Richard Wright's Native Son and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man as one of the greatest novels in 20th century African American literature, author Dorothy Herrmann says.
NEWS
September 22, 2003 | By Acel Moore
Eula Cousins is a dynamic, well organized, gregarious person whose charm, grace and infectious smile can disarm even the most cynical heart. She organized her own birthday party a week ago, inviting 30 guests for brunch at her condo in Andorra, after which she led a discussion on the war in Iraq. Just before the discussion began the waiters placed a small slice of cake with one lit candle at her setting. It was a symbolic gesture; Eula Cousins is 101. "I've asked you here not to talk about my past century.
NEWS
August 20, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marie V. Best Whitaker, 86, of Media, a founder of the Media Fellowship House, a community center established to promote racial and social equality, died of a heart attack Friday at Riddle Memorial Hospital. In 1943, Mrs. Whitaker, her daughter and her sister were refused lunch in a restaurant in Media because the waitresses would not serve black people. A white patron in the restaurant, Dorothy James, became aware of the situation and invited the three to her house to eat. Although Mrs. Whitaker declined the offer, the two women exchanged addresses and formed a friendship that lasted until James' death in 1985.
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