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Harmon Killebrew

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SPORTS
May 18, 2011
ST. LOUIS - Last week, Charlie Manuel wistfully recalled his many stories of Harmon Killebrew when the world learned the Hall of Fame slugger was in his last days. On Tuesday morning, after Kevin Camiscioli, the Phillies' manager of video coaching services, called Manuel to tell him Killebrew had died, Manuel turned on the TV. "I was very sad," the Phillies manager said. "At the same time, I started thinking about the laughter, some of the things we did, and the fact I knew him a long time.
SPORTS
May 30, 1989 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Mike Schmidt, it was not a very merry month of May: a .117 batting average (7 for 60), one homer, 10 RBIs and five errors. It was a month that triggered Schmidt's surprising decision to retire. Entering this month, Schmidt didn't appear ready to retire. He was hitting .261. He was among the league leaders in RBIs (tied for No. 4, with 18) and home runs (tied for No. 5, with 5). He appeared on his way to climbing past Reggie Jackson (563) and Harmon Killebrew (573)
SPORTS
May 18, 2011 | Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS - Harmon Killebrew, the affable, big-swinging Hall of Famer whose tape-measure home runs made him the cornerstone of the Minnesota Twins, died yesterday at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz., after battling esophageal cancer. He was 74. The Twins said Killebrew passed away peacefully with his wife, Nita, and their family at his side. He announced his diagnosis just 6 months ago and last week Killebrew said doctors had deemed the "awful disease" incurable. Killebrew is 11th on baseball's all-time home run list after a 22-year career.
SPORTS
May 18, 2011 | By Dave Campbell, Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS - Harmon Killebrew, the affable, big-swinging Hall of Famer whose tape-measure home runs made him the cornerstone of the Minnesota Twins, died Tuesday at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz., after battling esophageal cancer. He was 74. The Twins said Mr. Killebrew passed away peacefully with his wife, Nita, and their family at his side. He announced his diagnosis just six months ago and last week Mr. Killebrew said doctors had deemed the "awful disease" incurable. Mr. Killebrew is 11th on baseball's all-time home run list after a 22-year career.
SPORTS
August 2, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Mark McGwire will delay any celebration of his new status on the career home run list. McGwire tied Harmon Killebrew for fifth place last night, connecting off Greg Maddux for No. 573 in St. Louis' 4-0 win over the visiting Atlanta Braves. "I accomplished something, but I'm not going to sit back and think about it, I'm going to think about the game tomorrow," McGwire said. McGwire's two-run homer in the sixth, his 19th of the season, was the key hit as the Cardinals snapped Maddux's 10-game winning streak.
NEWS
June 6, 2007
BARRY BONDS is the BEST power hitter (and used to be among the best leftfielders) I've seen in my lifetime. I'm 60 and have been following Major League Baseball since I was 7 - so that span covers a lot of players, including Hank Aaron, Ted Williams, Mickey Mantle, Harmon Killebrew, Willie Mays, Frank Robinson, Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa. If and when Bonds passes Hammerin' Hank's homer record of 755, there will be NO national celebration. Both Aaron and MLB Commissioner Bud Selig have said they don't want to be in the stands when it happens - and that's their prerogative.
SPORTS
August 16, 1986 | By BILL CONLIN, Daily News Sports Writer
With a pair of doubles in last night's 6-5 first-game loss to the Pirates, Mike Schmidt passed one of baseball's magic names on the all-time list of extra-base hits. They were the 881st and 882nd of his career, breaking a tie for 31st place with Mr. Coffee, New York Yankees Hall of Famer Joe DiMaggio. Schmidt soon will pass former Minnesota Twins slugger Harmon Killebrew, who is 30th with 887 extra base hits. Incredibly, 54.8 percent of Schmidt's extra-base hits have been accounted for by his 483 home runs.
SPORTS
April 13, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Barry Bonds hit his 573rd home run, tying Harmon Killebrew for sixth place on the career list, and host San Francisco beat Milwaukee last night, 5-1. Bonds hit his major league-leading sixth homer of the season, a three-run shot off Ben Sheets (1-2) in the third inning. Bonds nearly connected again in the seventh, but his drive hooked foul and landed in the water beyond the rightfield wall at Pacific Bell Park. Kurt Ainsworth (1-0), Sheets' teammate on the gold medal-winning U.S. team in the 2000 Olympics, earned his first major league victory.
SPORTS
July 13, 2004 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They lined up, superstar after superstar, immortal after immortal. Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, Barry Bonds, Frank Robinson and Mark McGwire. Harmon Killebrew, Reggie Jackson, Sammy Sosa, Mike Schmidt and Rafael Palmeiro. Willie McCovey, Ernie Banks, Eddie Murray and Ken Griffey Jr. It's an impressive list of incredible baseball players from the past and present, and it made an even better photo opportunity yesterday at Minute Maid Park. "A lot of people would love to be in that picture," Schmidt said.
SPORTS
October 4, 1999 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Baseball's home-run carnival of 1999 came to a soggy end yesterday in Busch Stadium as both Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa hit one more over the fence to finish their seasons with a flourish. It wasn't quite the flourish of a year ago, however. The Maris family wasn't required to attend, and the finale was delayed twice by rain before finally being called in the bottom of the fifth inning, a 9-5 St. Louis win. Still, the game was official, if a somewhat sodden anticlimax, and it represented a few more scratches in an amazing record book.
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SPORTS
May 18, 2011 | Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS - Harmon Killebrew, the affable, big-swinging Hall of Famer whose tape-measure home runs made him the cornerstone of the Minnesota Twins, died yesterday at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz., after battling esophageal cancer. He was 74. The Twins said Killebrew passed away peacefully with his wife, Nita, and their family at his side. He announced his diagnosis just 6 months ago and last week Killebrew said doctors had deemed the "awful disease" incurable. Killebrew is 11th on baseball's all-time home run list after a 22-year career.
SPORTS
May 18, 2011 | By Dave Campbell, Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS - Harmon Killebrew, the affable, big-swinging Hall of Famer whose tape-measure home runs made him the cornerstone of the Minnesota Twins, died Tuesday at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz., after battling esophageal cancer. He was 74. The Twins said Mr. Killebrew passed away peacefully with his wife, Nita, and their family at his side. He announced his diagnosis just six months ago and last week Mr. Killebrew said doctors had deemed the "awful disease" incurable. Mr. Killebrew is 11th on baseball's all-time home run list after a 22-year career.
SPORTS
May 18, 2011
ST. LOUIS - Last week, Charlie Manuel wistfully recalled his many stories of Harmon Killebrew when the world learned the Hall of Fame slugger was in his last days. On Tuesday morning, after Kevin Camiscioli, the Phillies' manager of video coaching services, called Manuel to tell him Killebrew had died, Manuel turned on the TV. "I was very sad," the Phillies manager said. "At the same time, I started thinking about the laughter, some of the things we did, and the fact I knew him a long time.
NEWS
May 14, 2011
This column by former Inquirer staff writer Jim Salisbury was published on Dec. 21, 2007:   This story has been sitting in my sock drawer for 34 years. It is a story about a baseball, a little kid, and a Hall of Famer. It is a story about innocence and kindness and finally getting a chance to say thank you after all these years. Most of all, it is about memories. I could see that in Harmon Killebrew's eyes and hear it in his voice when he took the ball in his strong hands a few weeks ago and started reading some of the names written upon it. "Oh, my, there's Danny Thompson," Killebrew said softly.
NEWS
June 6, 2007
BARRY BONDS is the BEST power hitter (and used to be among the best leftfielders) I've seen in my lifetime. I'm 60 and have been following Major League Baseball since I was 7 - so that span covers a lot of players, including Hank Aaron, Ted Williams, Mickey Mantle, Harmon Killebrew, Willie Mays, Frank Robinson, Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa. If and when Bonds passes Hammerin' Hank's homer record of 755, there will be NO national celebration. Both Aaron and MLB Commissioner Bud Selig have said they don't want to be in the stands when it happens - and that's their prerogative.
SPORTS
July 13, 2004 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They lined up, superstar after superstar, immortal after immortal. Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, Barry Bonds, Frank Robinson and Mark McGwire. Harmon Killebrew, Reggie Jackson, Sammy Sosa, Mike Schmidt and Rafael Palmeiro. Willie McCovey, Ernie Banks, Eddie Murray and Ken Griffey Jr. It's an impressive list of incredible baseball players from the past and present, and it made an even better photo opportunity yesterday at Minute Maid Park. "A lot of people would love to be in that picture," Schmidt said.
SPORTS
April 13, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Barry Bonds hit his 573rd home run, tying Harmon Killebrew for sixth place on the career list, and host San Francisco beat Milwaukee last night, 5-1. Bonds hit his major league-leading sixth homer of the season, a three-run shot off Ben Sheets (1-2) in the third inning. Bonds nearly connected again in the seventh, but his drive hooked foul and landed in the water beyond the rightfield wall at Pacific Bell Park. Kurt Ainsworth (1-0), Sheets' teammate on the gold medal-winning U.S. team in the 2000 Olympics, earned his first major league victory.
SPORTS
August 2, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Mark McGwire will delay any celebration of his new status on the career home run list. McGwire tied Harmon Killebrew for fifth place last night, connecting off Greg Maddux for No. 573 in St. Louis' 4-0 win over the visiting Atlanta Braves. "I accomplished something, but I'm not going to sit back and think about it, I'm going to think about the game tomorrow," McGwire said. McGwire's two-run homer in the sixth, his 19th of the season, was the key hit as the Cardinals snapped Maddux's 10-game winning streak.
SPORTS
October 4, 1999 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Baseball's home-run carnival of 1999 came to a soggy end yesterday in Busch Stadium as both Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa hit one more over the fence to finish their seasons with a flourish. It wasn't quite the flourish of a year ago, however. The Maris family wasn't required to attend, and the finale was delayed twice by rain before finally being called in the bottom of the fifth inning, a 9-5 St. Louis win. Still, the game was official, if a somewhat sodden anticlimax, and it represented a few more scratches in an amazing record book.
SPORTS
May 30, 1989 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Mike Schmidt, it was not a very merry month of May: a .117 batting average (7 for 60), one homer, 10 RBIs and five errors. It was a month that triggered Schmidt's surprising decision to retire. Entering this month, Schmidt didn't appear ready to retire. He was hitting .261. He was among the league leaders in RBIs (tied for No. 4, with 18) and home runs (tied for No. 5, with 5). He appeared on his way to climbing past Reggie Jackson (563) and Harmon Killebrew (573)
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