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Harmony

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1995 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In the Middle East, Arabs and Israelis have long joked that there would be peace between them when camels fly. Well, there is great news in The Flying Camel, a cheering parable about how to rebuild a multicultural state by using castoffs found in the dumpster. This whimsical film is about the spirited collaboration among an Italian nun, a Jewish historian and an Arab garbage collector - all of whom have historical or spiritual claims to the same parcel of land. Individually, they struggle against their respective orders, universities and bosses.
NEWS
December 28, 1987 | By Bob Garfield, Special to The Inquirer
With favor wilt Thou compass them as with a shield. - Psalms 5:12 Mr. Gorbachev was still en route back to Moscow when the Pentagon Meditation Club convened on the third floor to fire up the Peace Shield. It was Friday at 11:30 a.m.; the Spiritual Defense Initiative was at work. "Just notice your breathing," instructed Ed Winchester, club founder. "Take a few deep breaths and release. Another deep breath and release. All right, take my awareness, my world of inner being . . . " And so on. Then motionless silence, as five meditators throttled up their bodies' spiritual energy - their personal Peace Shields - for the purpose of pacifying themselves and the world around them.
NEWS
July 25, 1986 | By VINCE KASPER, Daily News Staff Writer
In an effort to resolve a controversy over the posting of Korean-language street signs on N. 5th Street in Olney, a member of the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations is trying to convene a meeting next week for the neighborhood's business, civic and Korean leaders. Ida Chan, a human-relations commissioner, said yesterday that she hoped the meeting would allow both sides to discuss the matter harmoniously. The leaders were unable to do that at a meeting Tuesday night, when about 150 Olney residents - some shouting ethnic slurs - demanded that the Koreans remove the signs or they would.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The Comedian Harmonists were a gifted and hugely popular vocal sextet in Germany in the early '30s, but the group had a problem. Three of its members were Jewish. The fate of the sextet is the subject of Joseph Vilsmaier's The Harmonists. The movie takes the enormous risk of combining familiar Holocaust cinema predicaments with the staples of a Hollywood musical from the period when the group flourished. Despite these self-imposed odds, Vilsmaier pulled it off. One reason for his movie's success lies in the fact that this is a true, if bizarre, story.
NEWS
October 12, 2003 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With unflagging enthusiasm and first-class showmanship, the 80-plus men filled the practice hall with that awesome barbershop harmony as they rehearsed the upbeat tune "If My Friends Could See Me Now" from the musical Sweet Charity. The singers in the front row stepped out, their faces lighted with excitement as they combined fancy footwork with well-trained vocal skills. When the sound came together just right on a recent Monday night, they tried it again. The persistence and commitment had paid off for the Bryn Mawr Mainliners barbershop chorus when it placed fourth in a competition with the top 27 choruses in the Mid-Atlantic Division last weekend in Wildwood, N.J. The all-male chorus, with about 90 active members, started 40 years ago at the Bryn Mawr Fire House.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1997 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
There were so many better ways to spend an evening and $19.75 than at the sold-out Jars of Clay show at the Electric Factory on Sunday. The Christian pop band, which moved more than a million copies of its self-titled debut last year, put on one of the dullest shows this reviewer has ever attended. It wasn't all the band's fault - the sound mix and the cavernous concrete venue did thwart musical nuance. But much of the blame goes to the Nashville quartet. Every song was a mid-tempo rocker with little chordal range.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | By Patricia A. Banks, Special to The Inquirer
With chorus members deadly serious one minute, laughing uproariously the next, the small gym at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Mayfair took on a treehouse-club atmosphere. Two tall fans stood at the entrance, stirring what air there was in the room, as cool tenors mixed with booming basses. This was the weekly rehearsal for the Quaker City Chorus, an offshoot of a national group with a giant name - the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barbershop Quartet Singing in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
At some moments, Django Django sounds like surf guitar master Dick Dale got time-warped into a 1990s British rave. At other times, the London band sounds like a loping, psychedelic cousin to Animal Collective; then again, the band can seem like acid house producers obsessed with big-beat climaxes. The musicians are fascinating because they're hard to pin down. "We don't really see boundaries too clearly," says vocalist Vinnie Neff, on the phone from London. "When you love a lot of music like we do, I see it as a problem: We could never make a decision about what direction we were going.
NEWS
November 14, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The producers of the new musical Harmony yesterday abruptly canceled the show's run at the Forrest Theatre, which was the only scheduled tryout for its planned Broadway opening next year. Harmony was to begin Philadelphia previews Dec. 2. A terse announcement gave no reason for the cancellation of the musical, which has a score by Barry Manilow and book and lyrics by his longtime collaborator Bruce Sussman. Harmony was to have officially opened Dec. 17. A source close to the production, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the show had encountered financial problems.
NEWS
April 15, 1997 | Reviews by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Nu Flavor (Reprise) Can't get enough of that bubblesoul stuff? Nu Flavor tastes sweeter and lasts longer than most of the other retro-harmony quartets (like All-4-One and Hi-Five) who've emerged in the wake of Boyz II Men's super ascendancy. Based in Long Beach, Calif., this Mexican-American quartet boasts fresh, boyish voices. And it celebrates their talent at scribing (or finding) juicy, mid-tempo ballads. Warm a heart with "Baby Be There," "Heaven," the Latin-tinged "Soul to Soul" and the full-bodied remake of Journey's "Open Arms.
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NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Good Girl Mprynt There's something about good harmony that melts your soul. Especially an R&B harmony - and it's been a while since we've heard one of those on the radio. Now, Philly has two groups in the city that have harkening back to that sound and energy: Good Girl and Mprynt. Both have four members. One is all-female (Good Girl) and one all-male (Mprynt). On Christmas, in the wake of the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson and the death of Eric Garner in New York, the two groups released the One Sweet Day Project, a YouTube video covering the hit "One Sweet Day" by Mariah Carey and Boyz II Men, to promote social awareness of those who have died in police-related incidents.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before the singers embarked on the tour, music director Deke Sharon told them: "This isn't the competition, and these guys are not your competitors. " It was a good reminder for the members of some of the country's top a cappella groups - Voiceplay, Street Corner Symphony, and the Exchange - as they began the Sing-Off Live Tour, which comes Sunday to the Keswick Theatre in Glenside. The three groups had, indeed, competed against one another - on the NBC show The Sing-Off , in which a cappella groups vie to be dubbed the best in the country.
NEWS
April 21, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Usually when neighbors and developers lock horns over a project design, things turn ugly and stay ugly. There's a happier ending for One Riverside, a high-rise that Carl Dranoff plans to build on the Schuylkill next to the popular riverfront trail. First proposed last summer, the project at 25th and Locust has undergone a major redesign at the insistence of neighbors, who bitterly objected to the design - and even to the tower's very existence. Now the blank walls on the ground floor are gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Were you to see and not hear the Crossing's U.S. premiere of the John Luther Adams choral work Canticles of the Holy Wind , the sight would be mouths and eyes wide open in a state somewhere between rapture and terror, amid video projections of quiltlike patterns morphing into flocks of birds. And that's more or less what one heard Sunday at Crane Arts. The music operated at a level of imagination conveying rarefied states of perception - and in complete harmony with Dan Cole's video in the Ice Box space, a large, blank white room.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
At some moments, Django Django sounds like surf guitar master Dick Dale got time-warped into a 1990s British rave. At other times, the London band sounds like a loping, psychedelic cousin to Animal Collective; then again, the band can seem like acid house producers obsessed with big-beat climaxes. The musicians are fascinating because they're hard to pin down. "We don't really see boundaries too clearly," says vocalist Vinnie Neff, on the phone from London. "When you love a lot of music like we do, I see it as a problem: We could never make a decision about what direction we were going.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013
ARIES (March 21-April 19) A friend's motives will come into question. Does this one really have your best interests at heart? TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You have a loose connection with hundreds of people, but you're only tight with a few. The weak ties will be useful now. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) You'll be involved in the maintenance and upkeep of something you own. This is no day at the beach, but at least it's something you've been expecting. CANCER (June 22-July 22) From time to time, your loved ones do get insecure, especially if you don't return their calls promptly.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THERE IS A quintet of talent contributing to the modest pleasures of "Quartet," a winsomely soapy piece about life at an old-folks home for retired musicians. The invisible hand is Dustin Hoffman - you won't see him, because he's debuting as feature director after many years in front of the camera, and doing a shrewdly unobtrusive job. Actors-turned-directors often make two kinds of mistakes. One is to indulge the actors, to reflect the actor's bias that movies are all about performance.
FOOD
September 13, 2012
A visit to Jet Wine Bar is generally a drink-first, eat-second kind of proposition, where the menu of small bites and nibbles (a particularly nice selection of cheese) was conceived in support of the quirky list of obscure international wines. When a pairing is perfect, though, a magical thing happens: both the food and wine are better for the match. That is exactly what happened when this elegant ponzu-splashed pedestal of crab and guacamole - a familiar combo - paired-up with this crisp but floral Hungarian furmint called Evolúció.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2012 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. - "It's a small world, and it all comes together in Saratoga. " So said a faintly bemused Yannick Nézet-Séguin last week. Only while discussing his Saratoga concert lineup did the Philadelphia Orchestra's music director-designate realize he'd brought together talent from the current coordinate points of his career - London, Montreal, Salzburg, and Philadelphia - for an intensive trio of concerts during the orchestra's three-week residency here, which ends Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Dan Schwartz and his bandmates in Good Old War, Keith Goodwin and Tim Arnold, have been on the road almost constantly since November, both on their own and as the backing band for fellow Philly artist Anthony Green. Their homecoming show on Friday at Union Transfer is one of the last dates before a monthlong vacation. They're eager to be home. "It's going to be like Oz. Not that we don't like what we're doing, but we're ready to be home," Schwartz says from, of course, the road; in this case in Vermont.
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