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Harold Carmichael

SPORTS
October 9, 1987 | By BILL FLEISCHMAN, Daily News Sports Writer
Another member of the Eagles' 1960 NFL championship team is gone. Bobby Walston, the Eagles' all-time leading scorer, died Wednesday morning in Elk Grove Village, Ill. The 58-year-old Walston suffered a heart attack, an Eagles' spokesman said. "They're slowly dwindling down," ex-teammate Tommy McDonald said last night. "That makes six (players) from the '60 team who have died: Norm Van Brocklin, Howard Keys, Jesse Richardson, John Nocera, Joe Robb, and now Bobby. " As a pass receiver and kicker, Walston scored 881 points from 1951 through '62. His 114 points in a season held up until Paul McFadden scored 116 three years ago. Walston, the 1951 NFL Rookie of the Year, still holds the club mark for most points in a game - 25, against Washington in 1954.
SPORTS
August 12, 2007
7 Pete Pihos. His opposition was a kid, some poor rookie who wasn't used to Pete Pihos' pirouettes and pivots. During a training camp practice in 1954, Pihos embarrassed the rookie after he somehow broke free, corralled the football, and dashed downfield for a touchdown. "Don't let that bother you, son," Eagles coach Jim Trimble said. "Pete can do that to any back in this league. " Certainly in his day, Pihos was the most feared wide receiver - or end - in the NFL. A fullback at Indiana, Pihos was the Eagles' third-round pick in 1945, and went on to play for the Birds from 1947 until 1955, when he retired at the age of 32 to focus on his day job as a salesman.
SPORTS
January 25, 2002 | By Bob Brookover INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
History covers the auditorium walls at the Eagles' NovaCare Complex. Look to your right and you'll see larger-than-life photographs of Hall of Fame receiver Tommy McDonald and the team's sultan of sack, Reggie White. Look to your left and you'll find the powerful images of Chuck Bednarik and Steve Van Buren, two men whose jaws may have actually been chiseled from stone. Walk 50 yards through a hallway lined with photographs of former Eagles Pro Bowl players, and the history of the franchise comes to life in the form of a 6-foot-8 giant whose sure hands seem to stretch from South Philadelphia all the way to South Jersey.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | By S.E. Siebert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Harold Carmichael hung up his Eagles jersey eight years ago, but he still hears the roar of the crowd. The former NFL wide receiver no longer catches the spirals. He makes pitches to children about self-esteem and decision-making. "You've got to be careful," Carmichael told students at Log College Middle School in Warminster last Thursday. A soft-spoken man with an imposing 6-foot, 8-inch frame, Carmichael grabbed the attention of the 700 students. While he spoke briefly about his football career, Carmichael spent most of the hour warning students against drugs and alcohol abuse.
SPORTS
April 22, 2010 | By ED BARKOWITZ, barkowe@phillynews.com
IN HONOR of the 75th anniversary of the NFL draft, here is a look at some of the Eagles' all-time best grabs and worst gaffes. Who knows? The Eagles could add some guys tonight when this is compiled in another 75 years. Check back in 2085.   THE STUDS 10. Seth Joyner, LB, 1986 8th round, 208th overall Tremendous value for an outside linebacker of some great Eagles defenses. The Eagles took Clyde Simmons in the ninth round. Not a bad haul. 9. Pete Pihos, E, 1945 5th round, 41st overall Pihos became a six-time Pro Bowler and caught the winning touchdown in the 1949 championship game.
SPORTS
January 30, 2002 | By STAN HOCHMAN For the Daily News
"If the Eagles had won on Sunday, we'd fade into the ghosts of yesterday," Bill Bergey said in that barbed-wire voice of his. "And that's good, because we've had our day in the sun. " Bergey was a linebacker on that 1980 Eagles team that whipped Dallas in the NFC Championship Game. Day in the sun? The wind chill factor was minus-17 degrees. People remember that game because it was against Dallas, because it was one-sided, because it was at home. "We kicked their butts all over the place," Bergey recalled, still fiery after all those years.
NEWS
April 8, 2004 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
REAL GRASS. Terrific sight lines. Diverse concessions. Good beer. The Phillies have done us proud with Citizens Bank Park. And while it'll be nice if they win, it almost doesn't matter. As far as I'm concerned, they've already accomplished the real mission. It's all about creating memories. Mine are already under way. Last Saturday, I took my three sons to the unofficial opener against the Cleveland Indians. None of us cared that it was just an exhibition game, and we hardly kept track of the score.
SPORTS
December 24, 1998 | By Phil Sheridan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The voice came out of a crowd of Eagles employees gathered for Irving Fryar's farewell news conference. "Hey, Irv. " Fryar, waiting for the cue to begin a live spot on ESPN, looked over his right shoulder, looking for the face to go with the familiar voice. There it was, looming above those of the marketing people and secretaries in the back of the room. "Welcome to the alumni club," said Harold Carmichael, breaking into a big smile that Fryar returned. Fryar, 36, will join that club after the Eagles' season-ending game Sunday against the New York Giants, a game that already had loomed as the end of a chapter in Eagles history.
SPORTS
October 5, 1992 | by Kevin Mulligan, Daily News Sports Writer
This 17-reception, 345-yard, four-touchdown opening roll Fred Barnett takes into the "Monday Night Football" spotlight tonight is not a big deal to No. 86. The third-year Eagles wide receiver saw it happening this past summer, just as he once visualized becoming an NFL star as a teenager in Gunnison, Miss. "I never pictured myself on a certain team or in a certain color uniform," Barnett said, "but when I was a kid, I used to lay across my bed visualizing that NFL ball coming at me, in that perfect spiral you see on TV, and me catching it. "It was a goal of mine, and after I saw it take place in my mind, it was such a positive influence on me that I kept visualizing it, and it became stronger as I kept working for it. I just felt that one day, I'd be where I am right now. Right here.
SPORTS
September 21, 1992 | By Glen Macnow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A week ago, it was Fred Barnett who set a personal standard. The Eagles' primary deep threat did so with a stunning eight-catch, 193-yard spectacle against the Phoenix Cardinals. Yesterday, it was Calvin Williams' turn. The much-overlooked receiver, the man usually ranked behind Barnett, Randall Cunningham, Herschel Walker and Keith Byars in the local list of offensive threats, was outstanding in the Eagles' 30-0 pasting of the Denver Broncos. Williams had his best game as a pro. He caught five passes for 108 yards and two long touchdowns.
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