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Harold Katz

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BUSINESS
July 27, 1996 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former 76ers owner Harold Katz has lent his money and his name to a new $100 million venture-capital fund expected to start formal operations in September. Katz, who sold the Philadelphia basketball team for $120 million in March, is not the only investor in the H. Katz Capital Group, said Brian J. Siegel, a lawyer who will be the vice president and treasurer. The fund will concentrate on investments in the consumer goods, retail, food and health-care industries. The venture-capital firm, incorporated last month, will be based in Southampton.
NEWS
June 28, 1986
As a 21-year former resident of Philadelphia, and a life-long Philadelphia 76ers fan, I cannot believe what happened on June 17. The news was given to me in the middle of an office softball game - I popped out my next two times at bat! I am still in a state of disbelief. Moses Malone is gone, Terry Catledge is gone, three first-round draft picks are gone, and Jeff Ruland, Cliff Robinson and Roy Hinson are going to Philadelphia. Washington is laughing at Philadelphia, and with good reason.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | By Daniel LeDuc, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU Inquirer staff writer Bob Ford contributed to this article
Negotiators yesterday continued working behind closed doors on a deal to bring the 76ers to Camden, but no agreement has been signed - yet. After an unscheduled hour-long meeting with team owner Harold Katz, Gov. Florio told reporters he expected a final agreement "within the next day or two at the most. " But while the governor and Katz appeared enthusiastic, a spokesman for Gov.-elect Christie Whitman remained non-committal. Whitman has insisted that she would approve the deal only if taxpayers' money is not used.
SPORTS
April 29, 1994 | By Frank Lawlor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The worst-kept secret in the NBA became official yesterday - 76ers general manager Jim Lynam will interview for the vacant Washington Bullets head coaching job, probably before week's end. Bullets general manager John Nash said yesterday that he had received permission from Sixers owner Harold Katz to talk to Lynam. Katz verified the request, saying that Lynam had approached him on Wednesday about talking to the Bullets. "In fact, he asked me if he could speak to them, and I said, 'Go ahead,' " Katz said.
SPORTS
June 15, 1994 | By Frank Lawlor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The man to whom the future of Philadelphia pro basketball was bestowed waited only a few moments at a bank of microphones before starting his acceptance speech yesterday. His normally raspy voice quit after a couple of seconds - his lips were moving, but no words came out. "Excuse my voice," he said finally, sipping a diet cola. "I'm a little nervous right now. " John Lucas wasn't speechless for long. When he was done - almost two hours later - Lucas had outlined an ambitious if cautious future for the 76ers, a team for which he was given full power and absolute responsibility Monday as its new coach, general manager and vice president of basketball operations.
SPORTS
April 10, 1995 | By Frank Lawlor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One is the self-made son of Jewish grocers from South Philadelphia. He overcame severe stuttering, succeeded lavishly in business, and parlayed a weight-loss idea into ownership of a pro team in basketball, his first love. Another is a sports prodigy from the Baptist Belt of North Carolina. By 22, he was a tennis and basketball pro, but success unraveled him. He lost both careers and nearly his life to drugs, but recovered to inspire others struggling to conquer addiction. And the third sprouted like a weed in remotest Utah.
SPORTS
November 30, 1993 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writers Craig McCoy and Glen Macnow contributed to this article
Loyal soap opera fans still following the twisting, turning four-year saga of South Philadelphia's proposed new sports palace will know that it is Ed Snider's turn to back out of the deal. And that is what he did yesterday morning. Snider called 76ers owner Harold Katz to say their latest agreement for Spectrum II was being thrown out the unbuilt windows. Six weeks ago, it was Katz who had cold feet. What is it about the proposed new arena that turns two of Philadelphia's toughest entrepreneurs into nervous Nellies?
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | By Michael Sokolove, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For all the abuse that has been directed at Harold Katz - for all the on- court losses his teams have piled up and all the empty seats they have played to - the longtime owner of the Philadelphia 76ers has consistently done one thing right. He has turned a profit. Katz bought the team for $12 million in 1981, and he says it has made at least some money in each of the 14 seasons since. Figures obtained from the league, as well as sources with knowledge of his finances, support that claim, suggesting that Katz's pre-tax profits in recent years were as much as $2 million at times.
SPORTS
May 4, 1994 | By Frank Lawlor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jim Lynam, the West Philadelphia gym rat who rose through the ranks to become coach and then general manager of the 76ers, left the team yesterday to become head coach of the Washington Bullets. Lynam, 52, told owner Harold Katz of his decision last night, and his hiring will be announced by the Bullets at a noon news conference today. Katz lobbied hard to keep Lynam, who coached the Sixers for four-plus seasons before being promoted to general manager in 1992. But Katz said he did not begrudge Lynam his decision.
NEWS
January 11, 1994 | by Paul Maryniak, Daily News Staff Writer
A new player from the world of high finance has seemingly come to the rescue of Flyers owner Ed Snider, giving new life to his plans for Spectrum II as a one-team arena. Sometime this week, possibly as early as today, Snider will sign an agreement with an unidentified institution that has agreed to back Spectrum II, according to Snider's financial adviser. The loan terms are more favorable than those Snider had with a consortium of banks lined up last fall. "It certainly is something we're excited about," said Sam Katz of Public Financial Management, which has been working with Snider to find backing for the off-again, on-again project.
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SPORTS
June 26, 2014 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
All the 76ers had to do on that June day in 1986 was use the first overall pick on the consensus best player available and they surely would have been back in the conversation as a championship contender for the next three or four years. All they had to do was select North Carolina's Brad Daugherty, a 7-foot center who would have guaranteed that the Sixers had an inside scoring and rebounding presence even when a sweat-soaked Moses Malone was seated on the bench. "Select Daugherty!"
SPORTS
December 7, 2012 | BY MARK PERNER,, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
Sixth in a series of 25 THE SETUP: The Sixers were coming off a 6-year freefall in which their victory total dropped each season. The franchise was on life support and it needed an infusion of vitality. Enter Pat Croce. WHEN IT came to being a pro sports franchise president, Pat Croce was a neophyte. Oh sure, he proved that he was one hell of an entrepreneur, turning his physical therapy business into a $40 million pay day. But his strengths were his boyish charm, his charisma and his persistence.
SPORTS
May 13, 1998 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Harold Katz sees Kevin Garnett, of the Minnesota Timberwolves, holding a six-year contract extension worth $21 million a season and smiles. If Garnett, who has completed two seasons in the NBA and has never won a playoff series, is worth that in today's bloated NBA market, what would Moses Malone have been worth to the 76ers in 1982-83? "I look at Garnett, and you tell me if that's insanity," said Katz, the former owner of the Sixers. "Moses, one of the great scorers and rebounders of all time, vs. a kid who has played two years who's getting 10 times the money?
BUSINESS
July 27, 1996 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former 76ers owner Harold Katz has lent his money and his name to a new $100 million venture-capital fund expected to start formal operations in September. Katz, who sold the Philadelphia basketball team for $120 million in March, is not the only investor in the H. Katz Capital Group, said Brian J. Siegel, a lawyer who will be the vice president and treasurer. The fund will concentrate on investments in the consumer goods, retail, food and health-care industries. The venture-capital firm, incorporated last month, will be based in Southampton.
SPORTS
April 9, 1996 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Jayson Williams and Armon Gilliam, two of the six New Jersey Nets who spent portions of their careers with the 76ers, remember Harold Katz as the owner who never stopped trying. "[Katz] had buzzard's luck," Williams said before the Sixers squeezed past the Nets, 82-79, last night. "He couldn't kill nothin', and nothin' would die. " Katz, the Sixers' owner since July 1981, sold the franchise several weeks ago to entrepreneur Pat Croce and Comcast for what was believed to be $147 million.
NEWS
March 20, 1996 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News Staff Writers Dave Davies and Les Bowen contributed to this report
For Ed Snider, Pat Croce and Comcast it was the best of times. For Harold Katz, except for the cash, it was the worst of times. Like Charles Dickens' masterpiece, "A Tale of Two Cities," the packaging and sale of the 76ers, the Flyers, the CoreStates Center and the CoreStates Spectrum was two stories. One was trotted out before a jam-packed news conference in Ovations at the CoreStates Spectrum yesterday; the other developed out of public sight over a period of months. There was Croce, 41, the onetime strength and conditioning coach for the 76ers, letting out a war whoop and reveling in his position as president and minority owner of the basketball team.
SPORTS
March 20, 1996 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harold Katz had been beaten down. Yesterday, across the dais at the Ovations club in the Spectrum, the other big players in the deal by which the 76ers change hands were smiling. Valued in the neighborhood of a half-billion dollars, the deal brings the Flyers, the CoreStates Center, the Spectrum and the 76ers under the ownership of Comcast. There were not enough necks to hug or backs to pat in the room. Optimism and new beginnings were the order of the day. Not for Katz. No, for the son of a South Philadelphia grocer who bought the 76ers in 1981 for $12 million, the occasion was a grim one. "This is a very sad day for me," Katz said when it was his turn to speak.
SPORTS
March 18, 1996 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
They love Harold Katz out in Phoenix. Sure they do. The 76ers' owner sent Charles Barkley to the Suns. They love Katz in East Rutherford, N.J. Why not? In separate trades, he sent Jayson Williams and Shawn Bradley to the Nets, and granted free agency to Armon Gilliam, which allowed him to land in the Meadowlands, too. They love Katz down in Orlando, Fla. When he had the chance, he used the No. 2 pick in the 1993 NBA draft to take Bradley rather than Anfernee Hardaway.
NEWS
March 18, 1996 | by Joseph R. Daughen, Daily News Staff Writer
The $500 million mother of all sports deals was quietly set in motion by Ed Snider, who, sources said, is looking forward to the day when he no longer will have an ownership interest in the Flyers, the CoreStates Spectrum or the under-construction CoreStates Center. "Ed is 63 now, and he has a young family that he wants to spend more time with," said a source who asked not to be identified. "That's why he concocted this whole deal. He wants out. Like a lot of other owners, he's disgusted with the way things are going, with player contract demands, and he knows it's not going to get any better.
SPORTS
March 16, 1996 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Charles Barkley grudgingly had to decline an invitation to be a presenter at the March 25 Academy Awards, which are inconveniently sandwiched between two Phoenix Suns games. And not even the inimitable Barkley would have considered last night's first-half performance - 3-for-9 shooting, eight points - worthy of any type of award. The second half, maybe. Barkley finished with 29 points and 12 rebounds, torturing the 76ers one more time in a 128-102 blowout. That, sadly, represents the most points scored by an opposing team this season.
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