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Harold Melvin

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NEWS
July 5, 1996 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Marc Meltzer contributed to this report
Remember Harold Melvin of Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes? Remember swinging your hips to "Bad Luck" or singing to "If You Don't Know Me By Now"? That was about 20 years ago, before Teddy Pendergrass left the group, before the trio sank into near-obscurity. Now Harold Melvin, 57, lies sick in a hospital bed at Albert Einstein Medical Center as conflicting reports of his illness swirl about. He doesn't have a phone in his room, and hospital officials wouldn't disclose the nature of his ailment.
NEWS
February 24, 1997 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
A fund-raiser for stricken R&B star Harold Melvin has been postponed at least until the spring, organizers say. "It's hard getting people to fall in line," said radio personality Georgie Woods, who has been pushing the proposed gala. "We're waiting to get the stars we really wanted," he said. One of those stars is Patti LaBelle, said Carl Helm, who is helping Woods organize the show. But LaBelle has been busy touring with her new book. "She wants to do it, but time didn't dictate it," Helm said.
NEWS
April 3, 1997 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Up until this moment, the funeral had pretty much gone the traditional route: prayers, scripture readings, songs, letters of condolence. Then Harold Melvin Jr. stepped into the pulpit, and in seconds the packed church moved from Germantown to the Uptown. Sounding like an emcee introducing an act at the old theater, Melvin held up the obituary photograph of his father and said: "If you will, put your hands together and give a nice, deserving round of applause to the supertalented, the one and only Harold Melvin.
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Inside the sun-splashed Mount Zion Baptist Church of Germantown, the gospel tune "Goin' Up Yonder" oozed through the church's organ pipes. Outside, across West Rittenhouse Street, Kenneth Thompson stood against a brisk wind while strains of "Wake Up Everybody" escaped from a tape player he had tucked inside a cloth bag. "That was when music was clean, wholesome," Thompson, 35, of North Philadelphia, said of the song by Harold Melvin and...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1986 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
American rhythm and blues music figures prominently in Channel 12's summer festival fundraising activities, including tonight's "Evening at Pops" tribute to Nat King Cole, and tomorrow night's locally produced concert hour with Harold Melvin and the Bluenotes. Butter-smooth balladeer Johnny Mathis joins with Nat's daughter Natalie Cole and noted keyboardist Tommmy Flanagan to explore the varied pop, soul and jazz sides of the Nat King Cole legacy, tonight at 7:55. But neither the formal style of the "Evening at Pops" presentation nor the stiffness of Mathis' delivery really evoke the spirit of Cole's breezy, seemingly effortless yet slightly gritty style.
NEWS
March 25, 1997 | By Kevin L. Carter and Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Harold Melvin, the singer who led the R&B group the Blue Notes and fostered the talent of Teddy Pendergrass, died yesterday morning at his Chestnut Hill home. Mr. Melvin, 57, was surrounded by a large contingent of family and friends, said a daughter, Trudy. "I'm glad he is at peace," she said. "But I'm sorry that he's not here with us anymore. " Mr. Melvin had been ill since suffering a stroke in July. Bedridden and unable to speak, he was hospitalized from October until February, when his family asked that he be allowed to return home.
LIVING
August 17, 1986 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the early 1960s, new sounds were coming from the street corners in various neighborhoods of Philadelphia. Way west of here, in Detroit, birth had been given to the "Motown Sound," and groups like Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, the Supremes and the Temptations were starting to make it big. But this had nothing to do with Philadelphia. No one knew it at the time, but those groups harmonizing on Philadelphia street corners were in the process of creating their own sound. It would be a few more years before that sound was recognized and formally labeled the "Sound of Philadelphia," or simply the "Philly Sound.
NEWS
November 12, 1996 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
When he hears the smooth, familiar voice, Harold Melvin's eyes struggle open. His head, propped on pillows, stays cocked to the left. His mouth, framed by a graying mustache, slowly churns, but remains closed. Nothing else moves; Melvin's body is frozen under the hospital sheets. But Georgie Woods - "The Guy with the Goods" - has come to visit. And just like back in the days when it boomed from the stage of the Uptown Theater or blared from portable radios carried by nearly every kid in Philadelphia, Woods' voice demands attention.
NEWS
December 9, 1996 | By Claude Lewis
Georgie Woods, the longtime disc jockey and civil rights activist, is at it again. For all his radio talent, Woods is a social worker without portfolio. For more than 35 years, he has donated his time and made numerous out-of-pocket - and out-of-the-limelight - donations to the poor. He has purchased and personally delivered Thanksgiving and Christmas food baskets, and used his popularity to help raise funds for the needy. Last week, he was busy making phone calls to big-name performers around the country on behalf of Harold Melvin, the popular R&B lead singer of Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes, who was paralyzed by a stroke last June.
NEWS
October 6, 2010 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Teddy Pendergrass left an indelible music legacy when he died in January. He didn't leave much else. A bank foreclosed on his Penn Valley home over the summer - the property is slated for sheriff's sale next month. There's also an outstanding car loan and a lawsuit by a former songwriting partner. But none of that has squelched a bitter battle over the famed singer's will. For months, Pendergrass' second wife, whom he married in 2008, has been quietly warring with his son over the remnants of his estate.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Pendergrass, widow of the famed musician Teddy Pendergrass, sat on the witness stand in Montgomery Court Court on Monday and wiped tears from the corners of her eyes. It wasn't so much the questions that Theodore "Ted" Pendergrass II's attorney was asking as he tried to poke holes in her story. It was the hearing's timing. "Do you know what today is?" she asked Timothy Holman, attorney for her late husband's son. Holman seemed to know. Pendergrass died on Jan. 13, 2010 - four years before, to the day. On Monday, Montgomery County Court Judge Stanley Ott continued the legal tussle over dueling wills that claim to give either the son or the widow control over Pendergrass' estate.
NEWS
August 30, 2012
The Hon. Michael A. Nutter, also known as Mixmaster Mike, is a BlackBerry/Microsoft guy, not an iPhone/iPod guy. Here are some of the 2,005 songs on his Microsoft Zune. For a playlist of his music, go to Dan DeLuca's "In the Mix" blog at www.philly.com/inthemix : The Jackson Five, "I Want You Back" Jay-Z and Kanye West, "Otis" Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes feat. Teddy Pendergrass, "Wake Up Everybody," "Don't Leave Me This Way" Laura Izibor, "From My Heart to Yours" Chiddy Bang, "Ray Charles" DJ Kool, "Let Me Clear My Throat" R. Kelly, "I Believe I Can Fly" Patti LaBelle, "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" Marvin Gaye, "What's Goin' On" Public Enemy, "Fight the Power" Gil Scott-Heron, "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised"
NEWS
January 21, 2011
A funeral for musician Bernard Shaw Wilson, 64, who died Sunday, Dec. 26, will be at 11 a.m. Friday, Jan. 21, at Open Door Baptist Church, 1632 N. 26th St. Friends may call from 9. Burial will be in White Chapel Cemetery, Feasterville. Mr. Wilson helped define the Sound of Philadelphia as a longtime member of Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes.
NEWS
December 28, 2010 | By JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
Bernard "Bernie" Wilson, baritone vocalist for the soulful R&B group Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, died Sunday at Kresson View Center in Voorhees, N.J., said his cousin, Faith Peace-Mazzccua. Wilson, 64, had suffered a stroke in 2009 and a heart attack this year. Born and raised in Philadelphia, Wilson joined Melvin, Teddy Pendergrass, Lawrence Brown and Lloyd Parks - the last surviving member - to create the fabled lineup that was signed to Philadelphia International Records in 1972.
NEWS
December 28, 2010 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard Wilson, 64, who helped define the Sound of Philadelphia as a longtime member of Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, died Sunday. Mr. Wilson, a North Philadelphia native, was part of the classic lineup during the early and mid-1970s that was responsible for such hits as "If You Don't Know Me by Now," "The Love I Lost," "Don't Leave Me This Way," and "Bad Luck. " He was the flashiest member, recalled Lloyd Parks, at 61 the last surviving member of the group that rose to fame under the legendary producers Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff.
NEWS
October 6, 2010 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Teddy Pendergrass left an indelible music legacy when he died in January. He didn't leave much else. A bank foreclosed on his Penn Valley home over the summer - the property is slated for sheriff's sale next month. There's also an outstanding car loan and a lawsuit by a former songwriting partner. But none of that has squelched a bitter battle over the famed singer's will. For months, Pendergrass' second wife, whom he married in 2008, has been quietly warring with his son over the remnants of his estate.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2010 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
Are today's younger listeners sorely lacking knowledge of soul music, especially the protest classics of the 1960s and '70s? So suggests Salamishah Tillet, University of Pennsylvania assistant professor of English and Africana Studies, in her scene-setting liner notes for the vital (and in all ways Philly-connected) John Legend and the Roots collaborative project "Wake Up!" (Columbia, A-) , focused on period anthems of the Civil Rights Movement and leading our new releases parade today.
NEWS
September 11, 2010 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
What are Teddy Pendergrass and Tammi Terrell doing on a show about underappreciated musical stars? Four thousand people turned out to mourn and celebrate Teddy Pendergrass at Philadelphia's Enon Tabernacle Baptist Church after he died Jan. 13. With that many fans at his funeral alone, and eight gold or platinum albums, he nonetheless turns up on the season premiere of Unsung Monday at 10 p.m. on cable's TV One. (Comcast Channel 75 in...
NEWS
July 14, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
ANY MUSICAL group that dared to step out on the stage of the storied Apollo Theater in Harlem knew they were taking their lives in their hands. One false note before the toughest crowd of music lovers in the country and they got the hook so quickly their heads revolved and they were banished forever. Roosevelt Brodie knew what that was like. He was one of the Philly teenagers who started singing together on street corners, took a couple of different names, and eventually morphed into the Blue Notes.
LIVING
March 19, 2010 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
The desk is huge, handsome, and perfectly, absolutely clear. Not a single stray paper, not a file, not even a pen rests on it. Yet this desk is in the working home office of an extremely busy man. Leon Huff admits it - he's a neat freak, and it shows in his elegant Moorestown home, a place so immaculate it's hard to imagine anyone even lives in it. The music producer and his wife, Regina, have created a world of striking furnishings, color...
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