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Harp

NEWS
March 17, 2000 | by Al Hunter Jr. , Daily News Staff Writer
SONNY ROLLINS, 8 p.m. Saturday, Keswick Theater, Easton Road and Keswick Avenue, Glenside. Tickets: $25. Info: 215-572-7650 Sonny Rollins despises technology, hates it with a passion. So it comes as a bit of a surprise to learn he's using a cellular phone to talk to a caller. "I'm just out in my studio a little ways from my house," the legendary tenor saxophonist explained recently. "I don't have a phone out here. Since I was going to do a call, I brought the cell phone out here.
NEWS
February 15, 2004 | By Chris Satullo
Mine was 177. That served - so I didn't have to. In 1972, that fact made me both glad and guilty. Still does today. I speak of my number in the Selective Service lottery. If you lived through that momentous spin of the drum, as I did at the age of 18, you never forget the number that chance assigned you. By that stage of the Vietnam War, the number 177 was high enough to spare me a summons from my nation. If I were to claim that I know what I would have done had my number left me vulnerable, that would be a lie. That's why I try never to judge the choices anyone else made in that time of fire, anguish, chants and armbands.
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | By Mary Anne Janco INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
With a series of dramatic glissandi, 13-year-old Alexa Lichtenstein began to play the fast-paced Toccata, the sabre dance, on her harp. "I like the fast tempo," the seventh grader at Agnes Irwin School said. "It makes it more exciting. " "The harp's not as mellow as it seems," said Lichtenstein, who decided to learn to play the ancient instrument after studying piano for five years. "I wanted something . . . unique. I tried it out and ended up really liking it. " Next Sunday, Lichtenstein will join six other young harpists, including Emily Klein, 14, in a concert at Longwood Gardens that will showcase the versatility of the harp with selections including Toccata, Joplin Rags, and Greensleeves.
NEWS
February 29, 2004 | By Leslie A. Pappas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A baby harp seal stranded two days ago on a floating dock at Penn's Landing will be returned to sea today, the Marine Mammal Stranding Center said. Codirector Sheila Dean said the center, with the help of the Coast Guard, netted the seal yesterday after media attention attracted onlookers, which raised concerns for the seal's safety. "We just had to get it out of there," Dean said. "People were throwing hot dogs and steaks and all the things that a seal wouldn't even think about eating.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Truman Capote wanted Marilyn Monroe to star in Breakfast at Tiffany's instead of Audrey Hepburn, and he disliked Richard Brooks' adaptation of In Cold Blood. He was clearly not the soundest judge of the movie fate of his own works. The flamboyant author, who died in 1984, was generally unhappy with the idea of transferring art from one medium to another. But Charles Matthau's version of The Grass Harp is an affectionate rendering of Capote's delicate 1951 autobiographical novel that would surely meet with his approval.
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | By Pheralyn Dove, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The harp's role in popular music is rare at best. To combine its euphonious celestial sounds with jazz composition is rarer still. But that's exactly what classically trained Gloria Galante of Fairview Village does as harpist for the jazz quintet Kusangala. Kusangala means "to rejoice" in the language of Kiluba in the African nation of Zaire. And rejoicing is exactly what the group is doing these days at the release of its debut CD, which is self-titled. Lately, Galante's star has been on the rise.
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
As her departure from the Philadelphia Orchestra drew near, harpist Marilyn Costello was hearing a lifetime of old jokes condensed into a few days. Plucky? "Oh, sure," she said with a laugh. High-strung? "Well, I don't know," she replied, frowning. Unstrung? "Not likely. " She had taken her place onstage for the Philadelphia Orchestra's first rehearsal in the Saratoga festival, its August home. And her colleagues passed by with good words and old jokes as she struggled through the cruelest joke of her profession, tuning her instrument.
NEWS
March 19, 1998 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The harp seals swim down from Arctic waters in the dead of winter, headed for Newfoundland. Sometimes they miss their mark and push on, to the waters off New Jersey. Exhausted from 2,000 miles of swimming, they come onto the sand to dry off and rest. There, on the beaches of the Jersey Shore, they encounter a new danger: unleashed dogs. In the last week, two harp seals were mauled by beach-romping dogs, according to Robert Schoelkopf of the Marine Mammal Stranding Center in Brigantine.
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I have an odd issue for you. I am engaged, and my future in-laws are harassing their son (my fiance) regarding my engagement ring. I am not much of a jewelry-wearing person, and I told my fiance that I didn't want anything big and flashy. He chose a beautiful nontraditional ring with two rubies and several small diamonds, which I love. It suits my taste and personality - to me, it's perfect. His parents hate it and keep making snide comments about it. If they make comments within earshot, I always state how much I love my ring and how it is exactly what I wanted, but they keep insisting I'm just being polite.
NEWS
July 13, 2003 | By Terry M. Neal
If the Bush administration had wanted to make the case for going to war against Iraq on purely humanitarian reasons, it could have done so. Saddam Hussein was one of the world's truly bad guys, a horrific leader who brutalized and terrorized his own people. But the administration likely would have found resistance from conservatives who have long argued the United States should not try to act as the world's police department. So the administration made national security its strongest case for launching an exceedingly rare, historically discouraged, internationally frowned-upon preemptive war. Now the administration that had 100 percent certainty there were weapons of mass destruction has zero percent certainty as to where they are. The White House and the President's defenders have reverted to their fallback humanitarian position - that the removal of Saddam was justification enough for the war. The administration has found the human-rights card a compelling rationale - one with which the left finds it difficult to disagree.
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