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Harp

ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1994 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
I'll Do Anything is a Hollywood first. And, as James L. Brooks quickly and somewhat mournfully declares, "I think a last, too. " Conceived, composed and filmed as a big-budget musical - with production numbers written by the likes of Carole King, Prince and Sinead O'Connor and choreography by Twyla Tharp - Brooks' dream project played so poorly to test audiences last summer that, after much soul-searching, all but one song and all of the dance...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1993 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Music is draped on the great circular frame of history in which the old predicts the new and the new fulfills the prediction by reusing the old. Two composers who found their inspiration in ancient sources heard their music in initial performances Monday in the contemporary-music program at Settlement Music School. James Primosch's Four Sacred Songs, performed locally for the first time, used plainsong and ancient church sources for the vocal line and built contemporary sonorities and rhythmic events around them.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | By William R. Macklin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Is Camden ready for Gloria Galante? See, we're talking harp here. And not just that soothing purveyor of angelic glissandos and Celtic dirges, either. We're talking jazz harp - Afro-Latin polyrhythmic lilt married to Euro-classicism and Fats Waller-inspired technical sensibilities. Sound like the kind of thing that's not likely to fly with the no-nonsense, down-to-earth, doin'-the-best-we-can-darn-it folks of Camden? Then you're wrong, said Galante, 32, who'll bring her Philadelphia-based jazz trio to the Walt Whitman Cultural Arts Center Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1993 | By Peter Dobrin, FOR THE INQUIRER
Ned Rorem asks for some unreasonable things in his Book of Hours (1975). Harpist Marilyn Costello and flutist Jeffrey Khaner had the good sense not to follow his instructions to the letter in their performance of the eight- movement work Sunday afternoon at the Curtis Institute of Music. In the last movement, "Nightfall," Rorem's score asks for music that is "almost motionless, almost inaudible" - and who wants to listen to music like that? It starts out with an impossibly soft dynamic, tells the players to get softer, and then, at the very end, asks them to fade away.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1993 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Harpist Marilyn Costello may have retired from the Philadelphia Orchestra, but her musical activities continue unabated - including a recital she is giving Sunday afternoon at the Curtis Institute. Costello has taught at Curtis since 1961, when she succeeded her own teacher, the renowned Carlos Salzedo, as head of the harp department. She was still a student when she joined the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1945, a year later becoming principal harpist, a post she kept until her retirement this season.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1992 | By Peter Dobrin, FOR THE INQUIRER
Flutist Eugenia Zukerman and harpist Yolanda Kondonassis could be most easily appreciated Thursday night at Bryn Mawr College when playing solo, not as a duo. The acoustics of the Great Hall in Thomas Library presented a strange set of circumstances that kept them from being heard as a cohesive ensemble - a problem probably as frustrating to them as it was to the audience. Great Hall is aptly named. The amount of space it gives sound to travel is vast, and bare stone walls create acoustical challenges different for each instrument.
NEWS
August 20, 1992 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
As her departure from the Philadelphia Orchestra drew near, harpist Marilyn Costello was hearing a lifetime of old jokes condensed into a few days. Plucky? "Oh, sure," she said with a laugh. High-strung? "Well, I don't know," she replied, frowning. Unstrung? "Not likely. " She had taken her place onstage for the Philadelphia Orchestra's first rehearsal in the Saratoga festival, its August home. And her colleagues passed by with good words and old jokes as she struggled through the cruelest joke of her profession, tuning her instrument.
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | by Tom Di Nardo, Daily News Classical Music Writer
Attaining a professional career as a violinist or pianist is daunting enough, but the chances of becoming a successful harpist are infinitesimal -unless you're a bushy-haired Marx brother. So Philadelphia-born Ann Hobson Pilot is an example of talent triumphing over odds. She's been harpist in the Boston Symphony since 1969 (first chair since 1980) and happens to be the first black woman to hold a principal position in any major American orchestra. She'll be back home this weekend for two concerts with the enterprising contemporary music ensemble Orchestra 2001.
NEWS
July 22, 1990 | By Beth Arburn Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Seventy people were crammed into a room meant for 30. Some sat on chairs, others on the floor. Their eyes were closed as they listened to the instructions of storyteller Robin Moore. "I want you to go into your memory, a memory of childhood, something that happened with fire," he said softly. "I want you to daydream your way through it. See it like a movie, then store it in memory. " As he spoke, he plucked the strings of a small lap-sized Celtic harp, creating an ethereal atmosphere in the meeting room on the campus of Millersville University.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / TODD BUCHANAN
AS ANOTHER CHIP SHOT is lofted in Cobbs Creek Park, Charles O'Connor counts on Harp, his son's black labrador, to retrieve the ball. But after making several runs, Harp took the ball to the shade and refused to retrieve until he was rested.
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