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Harpist

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NEWS
December 3, 2003 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edna Phillips Rosenbaum, 96, the first woman to occupy a principal position with a major American symphony when she joined the Philadelphia Orchestra as first harp in 1930, died yesterday at Cathedral Village. She was a longtime resident of Germantown. Born in Reading, Mrs. Rosenbaum studied the piano starting at age 7. After seeing a harp in a shop window, however, her mother bought it, and the youngster put all her energy into learning how to play. At 17, she moved to Philadelphia to study at the Curtis Institute of Music with the celebrated harpist Carlos Salzedo.
NEWS
February 28, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Back in the days of telephone party lines, I coexisted with a household that included a teenage harpist, allowing me to eavesdrop as she explained the instrument to her friends before phoning in a recital - literally. Trivial as that sounds, such a chance harp encounter probably put me ahead of many who attended the Astral Artistic Services recital by harpist Bridget Kibbey on Sunday at the Trinity Center for Urban Life. Though derived from civilization's oldest instruments and the source of music's most ethereal sounds, the harp is unfairly perceived in the spirit of after-dinner mints - more a postscript to a musical experience than the real thing.
NEWS
October 27, 1986 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / ED HILLE
Edna Phillips made a bit of history when she was hired by Leopold Stokowski in 1930. As a harpist, she became the first woman to play in the Philadelphia Orchestra and the first female principal player in any American orchestra. After she resigned in 1946, she turned her energies to the Settlement Music School, which honored her yesterday with a concert at its South Philadelphia Branch.
NEWS
January 7, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Marilyn Costello, 72, a harp prodigy who infused Philadelphia Orchestra performances with elegance and virtuosity for more than a generation, died of cancer Monday at her Rittenhouse Square apartment. In 47 years with the orchestra, 46 of them as principal, she appeared frequently as soloist. Audiences could identify her sound without having to look at the stage, for her playing was somehow operatic. Her playing combined urgency, rich and eloquent sound, and the passion of opera, but in French repertoire, sounded through mists of atmospheric subtlety.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1994 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
Loreena McKennitt isn't the first to make a pilgrimage. Thousands of souls preceded her. But McKennitt is probably the first to include Glenside's Keswick Theater on her holy quest. McKennitt is a flaxen-haired Canadian harpist who began her career during the mid-'70s as a coffeehouse folkie. And as heard Wednesday at the Keswick, there's still a lingering taste of cappuccino pop in her music. But since taking up Celtic music a decade ago, McKennitt's explorations have led her into richer territory.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Karin Fuller, a harpist widely known for performances with orchestras and chamber groups in the area, was fatally injured in an auto accident Wednesday night in Delaware County. She was 38 and lived in South Philadelphia with her husband, Robert Capanna, executive director of Settlement Music School. Ms. Fuller was principal harpist of the Pennsylvania Ballet, the Delaware Symphony, the Haddonfield Symphony, the Pottstown Symphony and the Orchestra Society of Philadelphia. She had been a soloist in Mozart on the Square concerts in Philadelphia, had performed in New England and New York and had been a frequent performer in concerts of new music.
NEWS
January 28, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Orchestra 2001's concert Sunday afternoon at the University of the Arts' Laurie Wagman Hall provided a homecoming of sorts for Ann Hobson Pilot, the Philadelphian who has been principal harpist of the Boston Symphony since 1980. A trio from the harp repertory - Ravel's Introduction and Allegro, William Grant Still's Ennanga and Walter Piston's Fantasy for English Horn, Harp and Strings - formed the core of the program, which was nicely balanced with recent music by Thomas Whitman and James Matheson.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2006 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Though she is tagged a fluttering eccentric in "freak folk" circles, singer-harpist Joanna Newsom proved to be something more during Thursday's sold-out show at First Unitarian Church. Newsom is far removed from the confines of any circle, no matter how freaky. The word freak, which has chic currency, seems limiting when applied to her. With her piercing warble, Newsom's vocals displayed hints of Bj?rk at her character-actress best. Newsom, however, while taffy-pulling the nicely metered phrases of "Bridges and Balloons," never came off as histrionic, unlike the Icelandic wonder.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
When Emily Safko plays "Traveling Through Blarney," the sound of her Irish harp caresses my heart. It impresses judges, too: In August, the Medford sixth grader took first place in her age group at the All-Ireland Festival of Music (Fleadh Cheoil) in Derry, Northern Ireland. "I was so happy," Safko, 11, says, grinning. "My legs felt like jelly, like I was going to collapse. " Instead, she brought home the cup named for Turlough O'Carolan, the harpist and esteemed 17th- and 18th-century composer of traditional Irish music.
NEWS
August 13, 2004
The Aug. 11 letter "Blame orchestra board," concerning contract negotiations with the musicians, should have said Philadelphia Orchestra president Joseph H. Kluger understated the number of concerts the second harpist plays annually.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Takashi Yoshimatsu's Dream Colored Mobile is either extremely beautiful, pensive and meaningful, or extremely beautiful, pensive and absolutely vapid. No matter how you feel about the piece, it was valuable for saxophonist Jonathan Wintringham on Saturday night to have programmed anything by the contemporary Japanese composer, notable for writing the music for the 2003 TV anime remake of Astro Boy , and as rare as hen's teeth in our town. Wintringham, now on the Astral Artists roster, is going to be fun to have around.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
When Emily Safko plays "Traveling Through Blarney," the sound of her Irish harp caresses my heart. It impresses judges, too: In August, the Medford sixth grader took first place in her age group at the All-Ireland Festival of Music (Fleadh Cheoil) in Derry, Northern Ireland. "I was so happy," Safko, 11, says, grinning. "My legs felt like jelly, like I was going to collapse. " Instead, she brought home the cup named for Turlough O'Carolan, the harpist and esteemed 17th- and 18th-century composer of traditional Irish music.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
EVERY YEAR we give an annual mention to "The Bachelor" (a/k/a "Twenty-six's Company," "Desperate Housewannabes" or "Cathouse") and it almost always goes like this: Even though "Bachelor" Brad   ("Help, someone stole my personality!") Womack claimed that he was looking for a spouse, he and Emily , his final rose receiver, have already broken up. "Emily is not able to forgive Brad for what she considers cheating week after week with other girls," an in-the-know producer told popeater.com.
NEWS
February 12, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Though long treated like the frosting layer of any given orchestration, the harp is emerging - along with other instruments not in the symphonic front row - as a new creative frontier for young composers, thanks to the likes of Elizabeth Hainen. The glamorous Philadelphia Orchestra principal harpist gave a Philadelphia Chamber Music Society recital on Wednesday that was mostly new music because that's what is most available. But unlike some such programs, the hits were considerable and the misses still worthwhile vehicles for Hainen's subtle variation in color and masterly differentiation between background and foreground effects.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2010 | By Dan Gross
FISHTOWN HARPIST Mary Lattimore is just back from Los Angeles, where she recorded on Sonic Youth frontman Thurston Moore 's solo album. They recorded at Beck 's house in Malibu. Lattimore, Moore and violinist Samara Lubelski stayed nearby at the home of Mike D . from the Beastie Boys . Lattimore and Lubelski perform with Moore and Bill Nace Dec. 18 at the First Unitarian Church (2125 Chestnut). Tickets available at R5Productions.com. Lattimore, 30, has been quite busy recording lately.
NEWS
November 20, 2010 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
If career narratives unfolded with unerring justice, Ann Hobson Pilot would have been ours for the last five decades. But as it was, after being introduced to the instrumental love of her life, the harp, at Girls High and the deepening of her studies at Settlement Music School, Pilot left Philadelphia for the Cleveland Institute of Music. She substituted for the Pittsburgh Symphony, and became principal harpist of the National Symphony. But the chief beneficiary of her talent was the Boston Symphony Orchestra, which she joined in 1969.
NEWS
October 21, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gillian Grassie is describing the inspiration for "Silken String," the tune that landed her among the finalists in the prestigious New York Songwriters Circle Contest: "I actually dreamed it," she says, in a faint phone transmission from a rest stop in South Carolina. "I had this apartment in West Philadelphia, and I woke up one morning with this image - 'I'm in love with a man from the North Country' - and the melody. "I wasn't in school at the time," says the 22-year-old junior at Bryn Mawr College, "but playing music full time, so I had the luxury of going right to my harp and working on it for two hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2006 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Though she is tagged a fluttering eccentric in "freak folk" circles, singer-harpist Joanna Newsom proved to be something more during Thursday's sold-out show at First Unitarian Church. Newsom is far removed from the confines of any circle, no matter how freaky. The word freak, which has chic currency, seems limiting when applied to her. With her piercing warble, Newsom's vocals displayed hints of Bj?rk at her character-actress best. Newsom, however, while taffy-pulling the nicely metered phrases of "Bridges and Balloons," never came off as histrionic, unlike the Icelandic wonder.
NEWS
February 28, 2006 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Back in the days of telephone party lines, I coexisted with a household that included a teenage harpist, allowing me to eavesdrop as she explained the instrument to her friends before phoning in a recital - literally. Trivial as that sounds, such a chance harp encounter probably put me ahead of many who attended the Astral Artistic Services recital by harpist Bridget Kibbey on Sunday at the Trinity Center for Urban Life. Though derived from civilization's oldest instruments and the source of music's most ethereal sounds, the harp is unfairly perceived in the spirit of after-dinner mints - more a postscript to a musical experience than the real thing.
NEWS
June 28, 2005 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Onstage at The Fantasticks at the Walnut Street Theatre's Independence Studio, there's musical history on the periphery: harpist Walter Pfeil. Soon to turn 80, the trim, dapper, bearded Pfeil performed with the original cast of the forever-running musical 45 years ago at the Sullivan Street Playhouse in New York's Greenwich Village. Pfeil was only a temporary replacement during the original harpist's vacation in 1960. But he wasn't an anonymous pit musician; this chamber-size musical makes the harp a key part of the show's atmosphere and is as visible as the onstage characters.
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