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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1989 | By Christopher Cornell, Special to The Inquirer
The eldest was Leonard. You can tell him by his frantically silly piano stylings, that vaguely foreign-looking hat, his wicked ear for puns and his ridiculous Italian accent - the kind of cruel parody of immigrant dialect that would be picketed nowadays. He was known to the world as Chico. Next came Arthur, who one day acquired - of all things - a harp, which he taught himself to play - beautifully. (But incorrectly: Unlike classically trained harpists, he rested the harp on the wrong shoulder.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Those bulging eyes, that impertinent grin, that shiny, smeared-on mustache, that stump of a cigar, and those eyebrows, thick as raccoon tails, are all part of a wisecrack waiting to happen. Paul Wesolowski knows this; he relishes it. The bulging eyes are everywhere in his New Hope home: on the walls, behind plants, on the television, in the kitchen, in the bathroom, in the bedroom, and even peering up from Wesolowski's wristwatch, daring you to laugh. Finally, you do, at the scale and sheer madness of it all. Wesolowski is the king of Marx Brothers memorabilia.
NEWS
December 15, 1993 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Jean Lankford was sure she was going to die. Booted out of her car by a carjacker last year, she found herself sitting on the road next to the vehicle, locked to it by the seat belt that had caught her arm. "When I heard the engine getting revved up, I believed I was going to be killed," said Lankford, a travel-agency owner. "I did not think I was going to survive this. I was so frightened, so truly distraught. I was struggling to get my feet from under the car. "He took off. I was dragged a considerable distance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1993 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"There's no such thing as an old joke if you've never heard it before," Groucho Marx says toward the end of Groucho: A Life in Revue, the ramshackle evening that runs through May 16 at the Walnut Street Theatre. That being so, few old jokes were in evidence when the 1985 entertainment by Robert Fisher and Arthur Marx (Groucho's son) opened on Wednesday night. It's hard to believe that anyone over the age of 25 hasn't heard, "I wouldn't belong to a club that would have me as a member," or "I shot an elephant in my pajamas.
NEWS
April 22, 1989 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The name is catchy: A Day in Hollywood/A Night in the Ukraine. The concept is novel: Combine a first-act musical revue about Hollywood with a second-act re-creation of a Marx Brothers movie. The result, however, is not nearly as interesting as one might expect. The production at the Bristol Riverside Theater, directed by Edward Earle, is competent and entertaining but not particularly exciting. The first-act revue, which focuses on the film industry in the 1930s and 1940s, lurches fitfully and unschematically from scene to scene.
NEWS
April 18, 1992 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before it was scratched from last summer's release schedule, Brain Donors (a title which makes absolutely no sense) was called Lame Ducks (a title which makes a little more sense). Marketing whizzes at Paramount probably decided to re-christen this curious venture - which has finally found its way into theaters - when they envisioned gleeful reviewers tripping over themselves to dub this neo-Marx Brothers farce Lame Duck Soup. Actually it's more like a half-lame A Night at the Opera, with a little A Day at the Races thrown in. Except it's set in the world of ballet, and instead of Groucho, Chico and Harpo you have John Turturro, Mel Smith and Bob Nelson.
NEWS
October 28, 2010 | By Sam Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most writers would sell their souls to have their work spotlighted by Oprah Winfrey. After all, Winfrey's endorsement can make stars out of unknowns. When featured on her syndicated talk show, books routinely rocket to the top of the best-seller lists. So it comes as a bit of surprise to learn that one Philadelphia scribe is suing Winfrey, claiming that she read selections from a booklet he penned a decade ago. Charles Harris, in a suit filed this week in U.S. District Court, says Winfrey recited selections from his work last year without permission.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2008 | Daily News wire services
Oprah Winfrey tops The Hollywood Reporter's Power 100 list, an annual ranking of the most influential women in the entertainment industry. The chairman of Harpo Inc. was selected "based on her dizzying array of Oprah-branded media and her immense cultural influence," editor-in-chief Elizabeth Guider said yesterday. The Hollywood Reporter also ranks the industry's highest-paid actresses each year. Angelina Jolie is No. 1, commanding more than $15 million a movie, followed by Julia Roberts and last year's top earner, Reese Witherspoon.
NEWS
March 16, 1993 | BY DAVE BARRY
Recently I had the honor of being asked to vote in the International Best Dressed Poll. According to the information accompanying the Official Ballot, this is a worldwide poll, conducted annually since 1940, of 1,000 "fashion professionals, journalists and others with the daily opportunity to see fashion at its best. " I was very proud to be asked to vote, although in all honesty I should note that I was not, technically, asked by the Best Dressed Poll Committee. I was asked by Ellie Brecher, who received a ballot because she used to cover fashion for The Miami Herald.
NEWS
April 17, 2000 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
By all means, use your life and remember your spirit and all the other stuff Oprah Winfrey is always urging folks to do. Unless, of course, your life or spirit intrudes upon Oprah's. The talk-show magnate has successfully stymied the attempt of a former "Oprah Winfrey Show" staffer to write a book about the four years she worked on the program. It seems employees of Winfrey's production company, Harpo Inc., must sign a confidentiality agreement that forever bars them from talking or writing about their Oprah experiences.
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NEWS
December 17, 2012 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
'I'm in a one-day-at-a-time mode for most things right now. " Ayana Mathis might well be. Recently the Philly-born, Brooklyn-based Mathis, 39, learned that The Twelve Tribes of Hattie (Alfred A. Knopf, $24.95), her first novel, the first piece of substantial fiction she'd ever published, had been chosen by Oprah Winfrey, goddess of all media, for Oprah's Book Club 2.0. Mathis will read at the Free Library of Philadelphia at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 24. It's free. On vacation in Paris, "I picked up the phone," says Mathis, "and there she was at the other end of the line.
NEWS
October 28, 2010 | By Sam Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most writers would sell their souls to have their work spotlighted by Oprah Winfrey. After all, Winfrey's endorsement can make stars out of unknowns. When featured on her syndicated talk show, books routinely rocket to the top of the best-seller lists. So it comes as a bit of surprise to learn that one Philadelphia scribe is suing Winfrey, claiming that she read selections from a booklet he penned a decade ago. Charles Harris, in a suit filed this week in U.S. District Court, says Winfrey recited selections from his work last year without permission.
NEWS
March 17, 2010 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Get ready: Oprah's coming to town. Maybe. The media mogul - who successfully fended off a $12 million suit a dozen years ago, filed by a group of Texas cattlemen who claimed she defamed beef - could be in a Philadelphia federal courtroom as early as March 29 for another defamation case. This time, she will face Lerato Nomvuyo Mzamane, former headmistress of the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls in South Africa. Mzamane, who once served as an administrator at Germantown Friends School, contends that Winfrey defamed her in 2007 in the wake of a sex-abuse scandal that erupted at the private boarding school 10 months after it opened.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2009 | By John Timpane and Inga Saffron INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Pa. architect Bohlin wins gold Over his long career, Pennsylvania architect Peter Bohlin has designed both rustic-modern country homes supported by bare tree trunks and high-tech constructions such as Apple's glass cube in Manhattan. Now his eclectic body of work has been recognized with the prestigious gold medal from the American Institute of Architects. Bohlin, 72, often jokes that he founded his firm in Wilkes-Barre in 1965 to escape the influence of New York architectural fashions.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
What's funnier than a washed-up comedian? Two washed-up comedians. If you believe that, Schmucks awaits you at the Wilma Theater. (There's an unprintable joke in there, somewhere.) Roy Smiles, a British playwright apparently obsessed with washed-up comedians, wrote the resounding flop produced by the Wilma last season, Ying Tong: A Walk With the Goons, also directed by Jiri Zizka. Nobody except the few Brits in the audience got that one since it referred to British comics. Nobody even understood the name.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2008 | Daily News wire services
Oprah Winfrey tops The Hollywood Reporter's Power 100 list, an annual ranking of the most influential women in the entertainment industry. The chairman of Harpo Inc. was selected "based on her dizzying array of Oprah-branded media and her immense cultural influence," editor-in-chief Elizabeth Guider said yesterday. The Hollywood Reporter also ranks the industry's highest-paid actresses each year. Angelina Jolie is No. 1, commanding more than $15 million a movie, followed by Julia Roberts and last year's top earner, Reese Witherspoon.
NEWS
April 17, 2000 | By Francesca Chapman Daily News wire services contributed to this report
By all means, use your life and remember your spirit and all the other stuff Oprah Winfrey is always urging folks to do. Unless, of course, your life or spirit intrudes upon Oprah's. The talk-show magnate has successfully stymied the attempt of a former "Oprah Winfrey Show" staffer to write a book about the four years she worked on the program. It seems employees of Winfrey's production company, Harpo Inc., must sign a confidentiality agreement that forever bars them from talking or writing about their Oprah experiences.
NEWS
October 12, 1998 | By Andy Myer
In an extraordinary turn of events in an extraordinary week, the following series of e-mail messages was discovered by Brian Dribbitz, a 14-year-old computer whiz who apparently hacked his way into the White House computer system. This is the unedited correspondence downloaded by Brian: Begala@whitehouse: James, had an idea this morning! I think I see a way out of this mess, maybe turn the whole disaster around. how about gettin' the Prez onto Oprah! That lady's flyin' at the moment, probably well on her way to a Nobel Peace Prize or something.
NEWS
December 15, 1993 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Jean Lankford was sure she was going to die. Booted out of her car by a carjacker last year, she found herself sitting on the road next to the vehicle, locked to it by the seat belt that had caught her arm. "When I heard the engine getting revved up, I believed I was going to be killed," said Lankford, a travel-agency owner. "I did not think I was going to survive this. I was so frightened, so truly distraught. I was struggling to get my feet from under the car. "He took off. I was dragged a considerable distance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1993 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
"There's no such thing as an old joke if you've never heard it before," Groucho Marx says toward the end of Groucho: A Life in Revue, the ramshackle evening that runs through May 16 at the Walnut Street Theatre. That being so, few old jokes were in evidence when the 1985 entertainment by Robert Fisher and Arthur Marx (Groucho's son) opened on Wednesday night. It's hard to believe that anyone over the age of 25 hasn't heard, "I wouldn't belong to a club that would have me as a member," or "I shot an elephant in my pajamas.
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