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Harriet Tubman

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NEWS
October 11, 2005 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Growing up in a predominantly white culture, they didn't talk about it much outside the home. And when they did talk about it, they were not always believed. "People who knew me all my life never knew," said Sidney Taylor, president of the African American Historical and Cultural Society of Bucks County. And now, as plans to honor the contributions of black Americans to the borough of Bristol are moving forward, Louise Davis, secretary-treasurer of the society and Taylor's cousin, worries it may seem self-serving that the sculpture they have chosen to sit on the banks of the Delaware depicts their relative - Harriet Ross Tubman, the famous conductor of the Underground Railroad.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
President Andrew Jackson, slaveholder and killer of Indians and Englishmen, please step to the back. Harriet Tubman, African American abolitionist and leader of the Underground Railroad, come up front. On Wednesday, the federal Treasury Department announced the switch that's coming to the $20 bill, with the nation's seventh president losing his spot - a change that brought reaction from political leaders, schoolchildren, academics, and numismatists in Philadelphia and elsewhere. "I can't think of a better choice for the $20 bill than Harriet Tubman," tweeted Hillary Clinton.
NEWS
March 10, 2010 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
For bibliophile and educator Charles Blockson, the mute, simple evidence of abolitionist Harriet Tubman's life - photographs, dinner utensils, hymnal - possess a personal power, a resonance that flows over decades. He has maintained stewardship of these fragile relics for years, holding them, he says, in trust. Now the moment has come to place them before the larger world. Today, Blockson will transfer his collection of 39 Tubman artifacts to the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African American History and Culture, expected to open in Washington in 2015, and Rep. Robert A. Brady (D., Pa.)
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Dom Giordano
LATE LAST WEEK, Google's top trending question was depressing. The question was "Who is Harriet Tubman?" It's hard to believe so many people would have no sense of Tubman when Treasury Secretary Jack Lew named her to replace former President Andrew Jackson on the front of the $20 bill. Sadly, this ignorance was predictable. Almost equally predictable was that Tubman would not replace Alexander Hamilton, as had been originally speculated. The thought originally was to get a prominent woman on our currency, and Hamilton was not a former president and thus targeted.
NEWS
July 27, 1994 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The life of Harriet Tubman, perhaps the most famous conductor of the Underground Railroad, has been the subject of at least five biographies as well as countless essays and papers, and even a popular movie, A Woman Called Moses, starring Cicely Tyson. Jim McGowan, who has spent 10 years researching a biography of Tubman he is working on, said all of these materials had overlooked a pivotal aspect of her life, her motive for leading more than 200 other slaves to freedom during the 1850s and 1860s.
NEWS
May 20, 1994 | For The Inquirer / BILL CAIN)
Playing the role of Harriet Tubman, Diane Leslie (center) arranged students, acting as slaves, from Media-Providence Friends School in a circle. She then gave them instructions yesterday on how to escape their owners during a re-enactment of the Underground Railroad. The event was held at a Concord Township springhouse that was one of the original stops along the historic route.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Daisy Century's electrifying reenactment of Harriet Tubman, the death-defying 19th-century abolitionist who led hundreds of slaves to freedom, highlighted Sunday's Juneteenth celebration at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Elkins Park. Juneteenth celebrates June 19, 1865, when Union soldiers enforced President Lincoln's 1863 Emancipation Proclamation in Texas, freeing its 250,000 slaves and signaling the end of slavery in the United States. St. Paul's, at 7809 Old York Rd., is a self-described "deliberately multicultural church.
NEWS
April 26, 2016
ISSUE | U.S. CURRENCY Putting a relevant face on history I love that African American abolitionist and Underground Railroad leader Harriet Tubman will be on the front of the $20 bill, but Andrew Jackson should be removed entirely instead of put on the back ("Harriet Tubman's place of honor," Thursday). It's past time that history's rich diversity replaces the status quo: Anglo-Saxon, male faces. To those who claim that such changes are politically correct, I say the traditional telling of history has always been politically motivated.
NEWS
October 31, 1996 | by Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Theater Critic
The extraordinary life of abolitionist Harriet Tubman is brought to the stage in "Harriet's Return," an earnest production now playing at Bushfire Theater. Meeting the challenge of this overly long one-woman show is Charlotte Staten, who does remarkably well, given a script that is more straightforward history lesson than the remarkable drama it could be. Playing Tubman from about the age of 6, through her roles as conductor for the Underground Railroad, leader and spy for the Union Army and civil-rights activist, Staten doles out Tubman's life at a steady pace, breathing life into the legend of history books.
NEWS
April 29, 2016
ISSUE | U.S. CURRENCY Powerful first lady Reflecting on the decision to place Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill ("Putting a relevant face on history," Monday), I thought of another champion of civil rights who is too often ignored: Eleanor Roosevelt. While Tubman is a worthy choice, Roosevelt's courage and tenacity in championing the rights of all citizens deserve the recognition she will get by being placed on the back of some $5 bills. I am old enough to remember the black-and-white newsreel of Philadelphia-born singer Marian Anderson's concert at the Lincoln Memorial, which would not have occurred without the first lady's intervention.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 22, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
When President Obama helps dedicate the National Museum of African American History and Culture on Saturday in Washington, he'll be marking the debut on the National Mall of the black experience. Starting from nothing, over the last decade and a half, the museum has acquired a collection of close to 40,000 objects and documents; more than 3,000 will be on exhibition when doors open at 1 p.m., after a musical prelude and a dedication ceremony that begins at 9 a.m. By virtue of its size and national focus, the museum will obviously be telling a sweeping story.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Daisy Century's electrifying reenactment of Harriet Tubman, the death-defying 19th-century abolitionist who led hundreds of slaves to freedom, highlighted Sunday's Juneteenth celebration at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Elkins Park. Juneteenth celebrates June 19, 1865, when Union soldiers enforced President Lincoln's 1863 Emancipation Proclamation in Texas, freeing its 250,000 slaves and signaling the end of slavery in the United States. St. Paul's, at 7809 Old York Rd., is a self-described "deliberately multicultural church.
NEWS
May 17, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
She was left in a Washington waiting room while others were invited to watch the secretary of state sign the constitutional amendment that gave women the right to vote. History books also excluded Alice Paul. Then, for more than a decade, her body lay in an unmarked grave behind a Friends meetinghouse after she died in Moorestown in 1977. Alice who, you ask? Soon, you will only need to consult your wallet to see her face and an image of the 1913 suffrage parade she organized in Washington to win equality.
NEWS
April 29, 2016
ISSUE | U.S. CURRENCY Powerful first lady Reflecting on the decision to place Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill ("Putting a relevant face on history," Monday), I thought of another champion of civil rights who is too often ignored: Eleanor Roosevelt. While Tubman is a worthy choice, Roosevelt's courage and tenacity in championing the rights of all citizens deserve the recognition she will get by being placed on the back of some $5 bills. I am old enough to remember the black-and-white newsreel of Philadelphia-born singer Marian Anderson's concert at the Lincoln Memorial, which would not have occurred without the first lady's intervention.
NEWS
April 29, 2016 | By Dom Giordano
LATE LAST WEEK, Google's top trending question was depressing. The question was "Who is Harriet Tubman?" It's hard to believe so many people would have no sense of Tubman when Treasury Secretary Jack Lew named her to replace former President Andrew Jackson on the front of the $20 bill. Sadly, this ignorance was predictable. Almost equally predictable was that Tubman would not replace Alexander Hamilton, as had been originally speculated. The thought originally was to get a prominent woman on our currency, and Hamilton was not a former president and thus targeted.
NEWS
April 26, 2016
ISSUE | U.S. CURRENCY Putting a relevant face on history I love that African American abolitionist and Underground Railroad leader Harriet Tubman will be on the front of the $20 bill, but Andrew Jackson should be removed entirely instead of put on the back ("Harriet Tubman's place of honor," Thursday). It's past time that history's rich diversity replaces the status quo: Anglo-Saxon, male faces. To those who claim that such changes are politically correct, I say the traditional telling of history has always been politically motivated.
NEWS
April 22, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
President Andrew Jackson, slaveholder and killer of Indians and Englishmen, please step to the back. Harriet Tubman, African American abolitionist and leader of the Underground Railroad, come up front. On Wednesday, the federal Treasury Department announced the switch that's coming to the $20 bill, with the nation's seventh president losing his spot - a change that brought reaction from political leaders, schoolchildren, academics, and numismatists in Philadelphia and elsewhere. "I can't think of a better choice for the $20 bill than Harriet Tubman," tweeted Hillary Clinton.
NEWS
December 4, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
This weekend, St. Paul's Elkins Park, a historic Episcopal church in Cheltenham, will celebrate the role of the church and the locale in hastening the dawn of freedom for African Americans in the United States. In special programs on Saturday and Sunday, the church will open "The Old York Road to Freedom," a permanent exhibition commemorating the Underground Railroad, the secret system by which slaves were smuggled to freedom. The schedule is full. Actors from the American Historical Theatre will portray such historic figures as Harriet Tubman (who traveled the Railroad to Philadelphia in 1848)
SPORTS
September 18, 2015 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
FORMER EAGLES linebacker Jeremiah Trotter knew of the numerous athletes who transitioned into careers as actors after their playing days were through. Still, it was not something the "Ax Man" thought much about once he retired in 2009. However, back in 2012 when an opportunity to audition for the lead in a feature-film project, Trotter thought why not? "I didn't think much about anything," Trotter said about the process of getting a lead role in a movie despite having no acting experience.
NEWS
June 30, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew announced last week what many had waited a long time to hear: Starting in 2020, which will mark the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage, a woman will finally be featured on a paper bill. But women are still being shortchanged in more ways than one. The nonprofit Women on 20s began campaigning earlier this year for a woman's image to replace Andrew Jackson's on the $20 bill. But Lew announced that the yet-to-be-determined female figure would instead appear on the $10. Many have joked that given the wage gap between men and women, the new $10 might be worth as little as $7.70.
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