CollectionsHarry Belafonte
IN THE NEWS

Harry Belafonte

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 27, 1998 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
In announcing that singer Harry Belafonte will be the first recipient of the Marian Anderson Award, to be given annually by the City of Philadelphia, Mayor Rendell yesterday made it clear that talent and fame alone are not enough to win this one. The awardee must, in the tradition of Marian Anderson, also be one who has used his or her talent and fame to benefit humanity, the mayor said. Belafonte's humanitarian efforts to raise funds for famine relief in Africa and for hungry children in America, won him the Dag Hammarskjold Peace Medal in 1981 and the Martin Luther King Jr. Peace Prize in 1989.
NEWS
December 31, 1987 | By BARBARA BECK, Daily News Staff Writer
You are forever impressed with those chiseled good looks, the well maintained dancer's body. And when he speaks, you are forever awed by the voice. The legendary Harry Belafonte, 60, twice married, father of four, is now an outspoken activist in the anti-nuclear movement, the poor people's campaign, civil rights, famine in Africa. He believes Third World countries should pool their cultures and assets, develop their own media and thus their own power. But the King of Day O, who opens tonight (the first of three)
NEWS
June 20, 1998 | By Ralph Cipriano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harry Belafonte is coming to town next week to collect the first Marian Anderson Award, but the city's plans to honor Anderson, the South Philly contralto, with a Center City mural have been put on hold until next year. The city had hired California artist Kent Twitchell - locally famous for the 45-foot-tall Dr. J mural at 12th and Ridge - to paint a 60-foot-high and 135-foot-long tribute to Anderson at 13th and Locust, but scheduling conflicts have postponed the $25,000 project.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1994 | By Donna Rosenthal, FOR THE INQUIRER
Harry Belafonte nominally lives in New York, but his artistic and humanitarian projects take him all over the globe - helping to immunize African children, meeting with Crips and Bloods in South Central Los Angeles to help them maintain their truce, galvanizing the U.N. General Assembly with speeches about troubled and needy youths. Last month, the singer-actor-director returned from a six-day tour of Rwanda and the Rwandan refugee camps in Goma, Zaire, in his role as UNICEF's goodwill ambassador.
NEWS
December 9, 2012
1. d. Spike Jones & His City Slickers. 2. i. Mabel Scott. 3. c. Stan Freeberg. 4. h. Gayla Peevey. 5. j. Yogi Yorgesson (Harry Stewart). 6. g. Orioles. 7. f. Amos Milburn. 8. b. Harry Belafonte. 9. e. Eartha Kitt. 10. a. Eddy Arnold.
NEWS
October 30, 2011
Indicates wheelchair-accessible. Events are free unless otherwise indicated. Authors Free Library of Philadelphia. Central Library (Montgomery Auditorium), 1901 Vine St; 215-567-4341; www.freelibrary.org . Colson Whitehead will introduce the film "Night of the Living Dead" then discuss his new book, "Zone One," after the film. Film at 6 p.m.; discussion at 7:30 Mon. Joan Didion, "Blue Nights. " $7-$15. 7:30 p.m. Thu. Harry Belafonte, "My Song: A Memoir.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Sidney Poitier never met Marian Anderson. Nor did he listen to recordings of the legendary contralto. His taste swung toward swing and jazz, not opera. "But even as a semiliterate youngster of 16 from the islands," Poitier says, in the Bahamian lilt that is his unique music, "I had a sense of the person she was. The kind of person who had a cultural gift and social responsibility. " The same can be said of Poitier, 79, a living national treasure whose triumphs as an actor, mentor and memoirist inspired three generations.
NEWS
June 26, 1998 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Tomorrow, Harry Belafonte - singer, actor, activist, ageless hunk - will receive the inaugural Marian Anderson Award as part of the Sunoco Welcome America! festivities. Named after the famous Philadelphia contralto, the prize includes a $100,000 honorarium. A committee chaired by film director Jonathan Demme selected the 71-year-old Belafonte. "Harry Belafonte exemplified in the strongest possible ways the quality the panel wants to honor," said Patrick Moran, executive director of Philadelphia Festival of the Arts Inc., which is producing the Anderson award events.
NEWS
December 1, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
There are built-in problems to movies like "White Man's Burden" that aim to expose racist attitudes by using some kind of table-turning stunt. Like Melvin Van Peebles' "Watermelon Man" or the more recent "Soul Man," "White Man's Burden" asks its audience to consider what the world would be like if white were black and black were white. The problem comes in defining black and white. How do you make generalizations about particular racial or ethnic groups without demeaning and trivializing members of that group?
NEWS
July 28, 2006
What a magnificent performance by the Marian Anderson Award selection committee in choosing Sidney Poitier as this year's recipient. In November, Poitier will join an exclusive club of seven, including his friend Harry Belafonte, who in 1998 became the first recipient. The other past recipients are Gregory Peck, Elizabeth Taylor, Quincy Jones, Danny Glover and Oprah Winfrey. During the turbulent civil rights era, Poitier sent a powerful message as he portrayed strong, conscience-driven black men much different from the stereotypically lazy, funny African American males with whom white movie audiences were more comfortable.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
SONGS AND stories about the late, great South African (and world) leader Nelson Mandela will be top of mind for Hugh Masekela tonight, as the trumpeter, singer and composer dedicates a show at the Sellersville Theater to his recently departed (in December) homeland friend and fellow freedom fighter. But, in truth, Masekela's welcome return (just a year after a triumphant night at the Zellerbach) also should be a personal celebration. Come Friday, this hale and hearty, still amazingly prolific Afro-jazz superstar turns 75, "with no intentions of slowing down," he recently shared, with a laugh.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | BY ROGER MOORE, McClatchy-Tribune News Service
YOU'D expect a movie about a song that has become the Hebrew "Hokey Pokey" to be playful. And "Hava Nagila (The Movie)" is that, in spades. That wedding, party and bar mitzvah staple, a song that the whole world knows and virtually no one knows anything about, is a ready punch-line, a musical eye-roller for some and a no-brainer for any band or singer that works the wedding circuit - Jewish or gentile. But Roberta Grossman's cute documentary gives weight to the tune, tracing its lineage to a town - Sadagora, in the Ukraine - and the 19th century.
NEWS
December 9, 2012
1. d. Spike Jones & His City Slickers. 2. i. Mabel Scott. 3. c. Stan Freeberg. 4. h. Gayla Peevey. 5. j. Yogi Yorgesson (Harry Stewart). 6. g. Orioles. 7. f. Amos Milburn. 8. b. Harry Belafonte. 9. e. Eartha Kitt. 10. a. Eddy Arnold.
NEWS
January 1, 2012
My Song A Memoir By Harry Belafonte with Michael Shnayerson Alfred A. Knopf. 469 pp. $30.50 Reviewed by Kevin L. Carter   Harry Belafonte, the singer, actor, activist, veteran, sex symbol, cancer survivor, great-grandfather, and confidant and supporter to many of the most significant civil rights figures in our history, has always had a lot to say about a lot of things....
NEWS
October 30, 2011
Indicates wheelchair-accessible. Events are free unless otherwise indicated. Authors Free Library of Philadelphia. Central Library (Montgomery Auditorium), 1901 Vine St; 215-567-4341; www.freelibrary.org . Colson Whitehead will introduce the film "Night of the Living Dead" then discuss his new book, "Zone One," after the film. Film at 6 p.m.; discussion at 7:30 Mon. Joan Didion, "Blue Nights. " $7-$15. 7:30 p.m. Thu. Harry Belafonte, "My Song: A Memoir.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2011
Wild about Harry THE GREAT Paul Robeson once advised a young Harry Belafonte, "Get them to sing your song and they will want to know who you are. " Belafonte's fascinating life is featured on tonight's "Sing Your Song" (10 p.m., HBO), a documentary that coincides with this month's release of Belafonte's memoir My Song. Baseball's history Scholar Neil Lanctot speaks on "The Rise and Fall of Negro League Baseball, 1920-1960" at 6:30 p.m. tomorrow in Bristol. Lanctot has written extensively on the times when baseball was a segregated sport.
NEWS
October 14, 2011
IN THEORY, AMERICANS like diversity. We try to see the world through Captain Noah multicolored glasses. But when we actually get down to practicing what's preached, the fallacy of social pluralism emerges in all its sordid hypocrisy. Take Sarah Palin. (And don't say "Please!") For all their admirable rhetoric about the value of being an independent woman with strongly held convictions, the professional feminists were appalled at the rise of this pro-life, pro-gun female pit bull. Ever since she roared onto the scene in 2008, Palin has been ridiculed and vilified for many things, not the least of which are her decidedly anti-liberal-establishment positions on "women's issues" like abortion (and abortion and abortion)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2011 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
WE'VE GOT YOUR classics, we've got your comebacks - Ben Folds, Peter Gabriel, Rachael Yamagata and more - in this week's new releases pile. KING OF CALYPSO: Can you name the first guy to sell a million copies of a long-playing album? Here's a hint. He was also the unofficial godfather of world music. A movie star. And a most impassioned, articulate champion of the civil rights movement. If you named Harry Belafonte, you'd be right. If you didn't, here's three ways to catch up. Just out is "Sing Your Song: The Music" (RCA Legacy, A-)
NEWS
August 16, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
Vance E. Wilson was a sax man much in demand by musical groups in the '40s, '50s and '60s looking for a performer with style and verve. He was playing with an 18-piece orchestra in Philadelphia in 1958 when Steve Gibson and the Red Caps came to town in need of a tenor sax. They hired Vance, and he performed with the group for a few years as they became popular, performing at clubs and theaters and making records. Vance Wilson, who toured until he just didn't feel like keeping up with hectic pace of traveling and settled down in Philly to work 40 years as a crane operator for General Electric, died Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2006 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Sidney Poitier never met Marian Anderson. Nor did he listen to recordings of the legendary contralto. His taste swung toward swing and jazz, not opera. "But even as a semiliterate youngster of 16 from the islands," Poitier says, in the Bahamian lilt that is his unique music, "I had a sense of the person she was. The kind of person who had a cultural gift and social responsibility. " The same can be said of Poitier, 79, a living national treasure whose triumphs as an actor, mentor and memoirist inspired three generations.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|