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Harry Potter Books

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NEWS
March 3, 2003 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Thirteen-year-old Will is an avid reader, and any of the Harry Potter books would get his vote for "best book of the year. " Despite being born with a clubfoot and mild cerebral palsy (a nonprogressive muscle disorder of posture and movement), Will is an active teen. He enjoys in-line skating and playing basketball. There is abuse and neglect in Will's background. He receives counseling for improving social skills, remaining on tasks, and anger management. He takes medication for an attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and impulse control.
NEWS
October 7, 2012
The Casual Vacancy By J.K. Rowling Little, Brown. 503 pp. $35 Reviewed by Kevin Grauke   When, in the history of publishing, has the anticipation for an author's eighth book been so different from the anticipation for her seventh? Five years ago, with Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows , J.K. Rowling tied a bow on her seven-volume epic chronicle of a teenage wizard's adventures. Both the young and the young at heart lamented the end of one of the most popular book series in history.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2003 | By Murray Dubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cappuccino babes of the world - get naked. Playboy magazine plans to do a picture spread on the "Women of Starbucks," and is asking latte-makers from its more than 6,200 coffee shops worldwide to send in photos. Playboy's Theresa Hennessey said: "Starbucks is such a big part of American pop culture, and Playboy is always trying to stay on top of the latest trend, so it seemed like a natural fit . . . " Starbucks has not warmed to the idea of the joining of these two cultural colossi, saying that it does not endorse the nude-coffee-makers issue.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | By Michelle M. Martinez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Perhaps magic was in the air yesterday morning, as everyone waiting to get a Harry Potter book signed by author J. K. Rowling walked away with at least one signature. Early on, getting an autograph looked bleak for dozens of adults and children who stood outside the Book Fair at Olde Ridge Village Shoppes. Most had preassigned line numbers, but store owners could not guarantee that the Scottish author could sign more than 750 books. "If you do not have a line number, your chances of getting a book are zero," a store employee had called out. But the crowd remained, and most left the store with an autograph and at least one of three books from the popular fiction series that has mesmerized adults and children.
NEWS
May 7, 2001 | By Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ken McCormick, a former substitute teacher with two children in the Owen J. Roberts School District, plans to be at tonight's school board meeting to argue that the Harry Potter books should be kept out of the district's classrooms. Years after the books about the young British wizard appeared in U.S. stores, the American Library Association says it has recorded Potter challenges in school districts in 26 states - for two years straight topping its annual list of books most challenged around the country.
NEWS
February 24, 2002 | By Larry Atkins
They're trying to muzzle the Muggles. Throughout the country, parents, school districts, religious groups, and others are trying to censor the best-selling Harry Potter books by J.K. Rowling. Why? The books' alleged occult/Satanic theme, witchcraft, wizardry, encouragement of dishonesty, religious viewpoint, anti-family approach, and violence. And now the Penryn Fire Police has refused to work the annual Lancaster YMCA triathlon this fall. They claim the Y promotes witchcraft by reading the Potter tales in children's story hours.
NEWS
November 29, 2000 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
The question of what books to recommend as holiday gifts is a tough one to answer. Do you realize how many books there are to choose from? Thousands - hundreds of them newly published. You could - and people do - make up long lists of books just for people interested in politics or parrots or palm trees. There are separate lists for adults, for kids, for boys, for girls. Larry Robins, proprietor of Robins Bookstore at 108 S. 13th St., says there could be a separate list of books with special appeal to Philadelphians.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1999 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
In show biz, they're always looking for material that is "presold. " That means stuff that people already know and love and can't wait to see in some new form. At the movies, Lord of the Rings is in progress with buzz to beat the band, and everyone is clamoring to direct the adaptations of those Harry Potter books. On TV, 1999's pinnacle of preselling comes Sunday at 9 p.m. on ABC with Oprah Winfrey Presents: Tuesdays With Morrie. The Morrie book, a saccharine salute to spirituality, has been near the top of the best-seller lists for more than two years, and lots of us have been following Oprah's lead for more than a decade.
NEWS
May 14, 2001
Stop studying crime; do something about it Just what we need, another study about violent crime patterns that tells us what we should already know about violent crime ("Study finds Phila. homicides often black-on-black crimes," May 7). Philadelphia apparently lacks the leadership to develop a comprehensive citywide crime prevention plan and put it into action. Many other U.S. cities took advantage of funding provided by the Department of Justice during the 1990s to produce and implement such plans.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | By Leonard N. Fleming, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shhh! Richard Williams has read the first of 37 chapters of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, the book that has millions clamoring for a copy before the 12:01 a.m. release on Saturday. Think you'll convince the community-relations coordinator at the Borders bookstore in Chestnut Hill to show or sell you a copy of the much-hyped and anticipated fourth installment? Not even Harry's magic could. "Everybody's wanted to look at it," Williams said. "The mania is unreal.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 7, 2012
The Casual Vacancy By J.K. Rowling Little, Brown. 503 pp. $35 Reviewed by Kevin Grauke   When, in the history of publishing, has the anticipation for an author's eighth book been so different from the anticipation for her seventh? Five years ago, with Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows , J.K. Rowling tied a bow on her seven-volume epic chronicle of a teenage wizard's adventures. Both the young and the young at heart lamented the end of one of the most popular book series in history.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2012
J.K. ROWLING isn't finished with everyone's favorite boy wizard. In an interview with the BBC, Rowling said she's not opposed to revisiting Harry Potter and the Hogwarts crew for another book. She doesn't want to do a sequel or a prequel, but she'd consider "a sidestep. " "If I did have a great idea for something else, I probably would do it," Rowling said. Despite the massive popularity of her series, Rowling expressed dissatisfaction with some of the books. "I had to write on the run, and there were times when it was really tough," she said.
NEWS
July 15, 2007 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a little before midnight Friday, scores of small, black-robed wizards will swoop into the Children's Book World in Haverford. Olivia Sun, 9, of Narberth, will wear a droopy, pointed hat with her robe. Eli Federman, 9, of Penn Valley, will wear round black glasses with his. Audrey Kintisch, 8, of Havertown, will carry a stuffed owl to complement her costume. Each will have a parent in tow - with a credit card. And so will begin the ritual surrounding the release of the seventh and apparently final book in the series by J.K. Rowling: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2005 | By Dana Reddington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He has kept children awake many a night following his magical adventures through five spellbinding books. Tonight, Harry Potter will likely do it again, as the sixth volume in the series goes on sale at midnight. Area stores are holding special events to herald the arrival of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, some leading up to the stroke of 12, others on Saturday after a good night's sleep - or a great night of reading. The Doylestown Bookshop, on South Main Street, will host an evening of activities today beginning at 10 p.m. Characters from the books will be mingling with the crowd, and Harry enthusiasts can play games and drink "half-blood punch.
NEWS
June 22, 2003 | By Dawn Fallik and Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Dressed in Gryffindor colors of scarlet and gold, fans scarfed pumpkin juice, played "Gnome Toss" card games, and stayed up well past their bedtimes yesterday to get the first copies of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. But these were no knee-high fans. A mechanical engineering student, a geologist and an elementary school teacher took the front spots at the Wynnewood Borders bookstore, salivating for the midnight release of the latest in J.K. Rowling's wizard series - usually placed in the children's sections.
NEWS
March 3, 2003 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Thirteen-year-old Will is an avid reader, and any of the Harry Potter books would get his vote for "best book of the year. " Despite being born with a clubfoot and mild cerebral palsy (a nonprogressive muscle disorder of posture and movement), Will is an active teen. He enjoys in-line skating and playing basketball. There is abuse and neglect in Will's background. He receives counseling for improving social skills, remaining on tasks, and anger management. He takes medication for an attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and impulse control.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2003 | By Murray Dubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cappuccino babes of the world - get naked. Playboy magazine plans to do a picture spread on the "Women of Starbucks," and is asking latte-makers from its more than 6,200 coffee shops worldwide to send in photos. Playboy's Theresa Hennessey said: "Starbucks is such a big part of American pop culture, and Playboy is always trying to stay on top of the latest trend, so it seemed like a natural fit . . . " Starbucks has not warmed to the idea of the joining of these two cultural colossi, saying that it does not endorse the nude-coffee-makers issue.
NEWS
February 24, 2002 | By Larry Atkins
They're trying to muzzle the Muggles. Throughout the country, parents, school districts, religious groups, and others are trying to censor the best-selling Harry Potter books by J.K. Rowling. Why? The books' alleged occult/Satanic theme, witchcraft, wizardry, encouragement of dishonesty, religious viewpoint, anti-family approach, and violence. And now the Penryn Fire Police has refused to work the annual Lancaster YMCA triathlon this fall. They claim the Y promotes witchcraft by reading the Potter tales in children's story hours.
NEWS
May 14, 2001
Stop studying crime; do something about it Just what we need, another study about violent crime patterns that tells us what we should already know about violent crime ("Study finds Phila. homicides often black-on-black crimes," May 7). Philadelphia apparently lacks the leadership to develop a comprehensive citywide crime prevention plan and put it into action. Many other U.S. cities took advantage of funding provided by the Department of Justice during the 1990s to produce and implement such plans.
NEWS
May 7, 2001 | By Benjamin Wallace-Wells INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ken McCormick, a former substitute teacher with two children in the Owen J. Roberts School District, plans to be at tonight's school board meeting to argue that the Harry Potter books should be kept out of the district's classrooms. Years after the books about the young British wizard appeared in U.S. stores, the American Library Association says it has recorded Potter challenges in school districts in 26 states - for two years straight topping its annual list of books most challenged around the country.
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