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Harry Potter

ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2011
Daily News movie critic Gary Thompson has reviewed all 8 Harry Potter films, awarding them grades as high as A ("Deathly Hollows Part Two") and as low as B- ("The Order of the Phoenix"). Here are excerpts from a decade of Potter punditry: HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER'S STONE (2001): B "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" is loyal and faithful and true, and if movies were dogs, this would be best in show. The $125 million production doesn't preserve everything from J.K. Rowling's beloved book, but it preserves an impressive amount, so much that its legions of devoted young readers will scarcely experience a bump or jolt along the way. . . . What fans of the "Harry Potter" books love is the encounter with a work of inspiration, one that produces its own kind of magic.
NEWS
December 17, 1999 | By Joann Klimkiewicz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Caitlin Garrigan-Nass learned that she and her fifth-grade classmates would be spending three months on a Harry Potter project, she was not the least bit excited. "I'm one of the only people in the world that doesn't like the Harry Potter books," said Caitlin, 11. But once she found out that puppets, music, and a dash of magic from the popular children's book series would be involved, Caitlin perked up. "It was so much funnier than I thought it would be," she said.
NEWS
November 8, 1999 | by Judy Blume
I happened to be in London last summer on the very day "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban," the third book in the wildly popular series by J.K. Rowling, was published. I couldn't believe my good fortune. I rushed to the bookstore to buy a copy, knowing this simple act would put me up there with the best grandmas in the world. The book was still months away from publication in the United States, and I have an 8-year-old grandson who is a big Harry Potter fan. It's a good thing when children enjoy books, isn't it?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
What's a poor Muggle to do? It's been a few years since J.K. Rowling published the final installation of her Harry Potter series. Since then, we've had Hunger Games and Hobbit films, but we seemed to be tapped out on boy wizardry. Enter Potted Potter 's young Brits, James and Del, a comic duo charged with keeping the magic coming for a little while longer. A whirlwind romp through all seven books (they claim 70 minutes, or 10 apiece, though the show probably runs closer to 90)
NEWS
July 15, 2011 | By Dante Anthony Fuoco, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ashlee McClease hasn't slept in hours. Listen to her rapid-fire speech - jumping among sadness, euphoria, and nostalgia - and it's clear she has been anxious. "I've been crying for days," she said Friday afternoon. "I'm just shaking. " Why all the anxiety? Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2, naturally - the long-awaited, bittersweet, and final installment in a colossal series. It burst onto screens at 12:01 a.m. Friday, earning a record-breaking $43.5 million in midnight premieres and $2 million on IMAX screens after selling out in advance on Fandango at an unprecedented 6,000 theaters.
NEWS
February 17, 2002 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harry Potter, boy wizard, has faced some formidable foes, from abusive Uncle Vernon and nasty Draco Malfoy to malevolent Lord Voldemorte. Never before, though, had he come up against an adversary quite like the Penryn Fire Police. The conflict is set not at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry but in a wee Central Pennsylvania town 10 miles north of Lancaster. There, a squad of eight volunteers who direct traffic at fires, accidents, and special events has refused to work the annual Lancaster YMCA triathlon this fall.
NEWS
August 16, 2007 | By Martin Kimel
J.K. Rowling may have penned her final Harry Potter novel, but that hasn't stopped Chinese authors from churning out unauthorized knockoffs sold under Rowling's name, with such titles as Harry Potter and the Hiking Dragon. More foreign counterfeit novels about the famous boy wizard are coming soon, some with slightly more political overtones than Rowling's originals. So grab a handful of Bertie Bott's Every Flavor Beans (or a chocolate frog) and get ready for: Harry Potter and the Eyes of the Great Satan (Khomeini & Sons, Tehran)
NEWS
July 8, 2000 | by Dana DiFilippo and Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Neither magic potions nor a lightening bolt from the vengeful Voldemort could keep Harry Potter fans from flying into bookstores into the wee hours this morning to snatch J.K. Rowling's newest tome about the fictional bespectacled wizard. At bookstores in Philadelphia and around the world, mothers and children waited with anticipation as the clock struck midnight and the eagerly awaited books were rolled out for purchase. "The books are in the building," sales clerks whispered at Barnes and Noble, at 18th and Walnut streets, as the bewitching hour approached.
NEWS
July 19, 2007 | By Allison Baker FOR THE INQUIRER
Millions of Harry Potter fans around the world are gearing up for the release of the seventh and final book in the series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, tomorrow. For the last eight years, children and adults have been swept up in the craze that is Pottermania, and Chester County residents are no exception. West Chester, Downingtown and Kennett Square have all won a spot on Amazon.com's top-100 list of the Harry-est towns in America, based on daily tallies of preorder sales.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Ten years. Eight films. Four directors. It's official: Against all odds, Harry Potter is as stirring a film saga as Lord of the Rings . In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 , the final bow of the boy wizard, his boon friends, and his formidable enemies, director David Yates (who helmed films five through eight) chooses to touch audiences rather than wow them. The finale is a potion that induces euphoria, tinged with melancholy. By now, Daniel Radcliffe's owl-eyed stare, Emma Watson's nostril-flaring incantations, and Rupert Grint's slack-jawed swagger are as familiar as our own kids' facial expressions.
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