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Harry Potter

ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2012 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
IT WAS A dark and possibly stormy night. OK, it probably wasn't stormy; Daniel Radcliffe can't remember. But the "Harry Potter" star was in bed expecting to drift off to sleep when he started hearing strange sounds coming from inside his flat. What's a former boy wizard to do? He popped up out of bed and grabbed "the nearest, bluntest thing" and charged what could have possibly been vengeful spirits from the netherworld. "I literally came out of my room brandishing a cricket bat [bellowing]
NEWS
August 1, 2007 | By Elizabeth Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harry, Hermione and Ron are sitting at the dinner table talking. "Good thinking!" Ron tells Hermione, after she stuffs a large portrait into her tiny handbag. "Thank you," Hermione says, pulling her soup toward her. "So, Harry, what else happened today?" "Nothing," says Harry. "Watched the Ministry entrance for seven hours. " But Harry, Hermione and Ron aren't actually sitting at the dinner table talking. In fact, they aren't talking at all. Their distinctive, nuanced voices are emanating from earphones and car speakers across the country through a different kind of sorcery: the voice magic of Jim Dale.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Ten years. Eight films. Four directors. It's official: Against all odds, Harry Potter is as stirring a film saga as Lord of the Rings . In Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 , the final bow of the boy wizard, his boon friends, and his formidable enemies, director David Yates (who helmed films five through eight) chooses to touch audiences rather than wow them. The finale is a potion that induces euphoria, tinged with melancholy. By now, Daniel Radcliffe's owl-eyed stare, Emma Watson's nostril-flaring incantations, and Rupert Grint's slack-jawed swagger are as familiar as our own kids' facial expressions.
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harry Potter is just a snippet of a scrawny boy, age 13, and, wizard though he is, he can't do a thing about his bad hair. But he certainly can make books fly. After scoring literary triumphs in England, the young sorcerer is on his way to even greater successes in the United States. And part of his fantastic appeal is due to the wizardry of the Internet. The third volume of his adventures - Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban - became one of the fastest-selling novels in British history after its release two weeks ago, topping even the sales of its two predecessors.
NEWS
June 22, 2003 | By Dawn Fallik and Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Dressed in Gryffindor colors of scarlet and gold, fans scarfed pumpkin juice, played "Gnome Toss" card games, and stayed up well past their bedtimes yesterday to get the first copies of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. But these were no knee-high fans. A mechanical engineering student, a geologist and an elementary school teacher took the front spots at the Wynnewood Borders bookstore, salivating for the midnight release of the latest in J.K. Rowling's wizard series - usually placed in the children's sections.
NEWS
November 1, 2000 | By Kristen A. Graham, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
It was a third grader's Halloween dream. In Anne Jorgensen's classroom at Central Elementary School, 25 desks were decked out with pumpkin cookies, spooky pencils, bags of popcorn, and other goodies for a post-parade Halloween bash. And room mother Janet McGinley made sure that the party was one the third graders would not soon forget. With the help of several volunteers, she used the popular Harry Potter books to hatch a theme gala that had the students pitch owls, pin the tail on the snitch, and join one of the four houses at Hogwarts, Harry's school.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2012
J.K. ROWLING isn't finished with everyone's favorite boy wizard. In an interview with the BBC, Rowling said she's not opposed to revisiting Harry Potter and the Hogwarts crew for another book. She doesn't want to do a sequel or a prequel, but she'd consider "a sidestep. " "If I did have a great idea for something else, I probably would do it," Rowling said. Despite the massive popularity of her series, Rowling expressed dissatisfaction with some of the books. "I had to write on the run, and there were times when it was really tough," she said.
NEWS
July 15, 2007 | By Natalie Pompilio FOR THE INQUIRER
Onstage, Darius Wilkins is magnetic, practically shouting the lyrics to one of his most popular songs while smacking his guitar strings with a force that borders on abuse. "I am a dragon and I don't care. I just want to see people scared!" he bellows. The sell-out crowd is enraptured, screaming and clapping along, dancing and raising their arms. Then the veteran performer snarls something into the microphone that makes his audience howl even louder: "I think we're really burning Voldemort's butt right now. " That's Voldemort, as in the bad guy in the Harry Potter series, the villain so terrible he's often referred to as "He Who Must Not Be Named.
NEWS
May 8, 2001
The Muggles of the world are proud to think they are perfectly normal, thank you very much. They often don't get involved in anything strange or mysterious because they just don't hold with any nonsense. Muggles, as any Harry Potter reader will tell you, aren't necessarily bad people like Harry's aunt and uncle, the Dursleys. And they certainly aren't evil like Harry's nemesis, Lord Voldemort. It's just that Muggles don't have a drop of magic in their blood. Poor Muggles. We'll give them the benefit of the doubt and assume it is only because they are magic-challenged that they find the Harry books scary - so scary in fact that there are efforts to ban the books from public school classrooms in 26 states, including Pennsylvania, where Potter has provoked a debate at the Owen J. Roberts School District in northern Chester County.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2006 | By SHAUN BRADY For the Daily News
IN "HARRY POTTER and the Gob let of Fire," the fourth book in J.K. Rowling's colossally successful series, the boy wizard and his friends attend the Yule Ball, a sort of Christmastime prom where the students of three wizarding schools socialize and play out their teenage angst. On Saturday, Philadelphia will host its own version of the Yule Ball, with less magic but more rock. Paul DeGeorge, one-half of headlining band Harry and the Potters, described it as "an extravagant version of a normal rock show with everybody dressed all fancy.
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