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Harry Shearer

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NEWS
August 3, 2000 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
Sure, they talk about "inclusion," but don't expect to see Spinal Tap play at the Republican National Convention. Or for that matter, a keynote address by Wayland Smithers. The GOP shindig is strictly a Paul Anka-Montgomery Burns type of affair, which might explain why a comedian like Harry Shearer is in town to make fun of it. "What convention? I haven't seen a convention. I've seen a bad infomercial," says Shearer, the former "Saturday Night Live" cast member and the inspiration of Smithers on "The Simpsons" and bassist Derek Smalls of Tap. "This is like the Jerry Lewis telethon - after Jerry stopped taking Percodan.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2012
Conan (11 p.m., TBS) - Will Arnett; Harry Shearer. Late Show With David Letterman (11:35 p.m., CBS3) - Singer Taylor Swift. The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (11:35 p.m., NBC10) - Denzel Washington; Richard Engel; M. Ward performs. Jimmy Kimmel Live (midnight, 6ABC) - Comic Russell Peters; Prince performs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2003 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The triple bill at the Tower comprises the New Main Street Singers, the Folksmen, and Mitch and Mickey. Haven't heard of them? That's because they don't exist. They're the faux-folkie acts from Christopher Guest's gentle musical spoof, A Mighty Wind. Now the troupe that put the hoot in hootenanny is taking it on the road for a handful of East Coast appearances, beginning with tonight's acoustic jamboree in Upper Darby. What are we to make of actors such as Eugene Levy, Catherine O'Hara, Parker Posey, Harry Shearer and Michael McKean singing songs such as "Blood on the Coal" and "Potato's in the Paddy Wagon" that are both anachronistic and apocryphal?
NEWS
November 14, 1988 | By Jody Leader, Los Angeles Daily News
Merle Kessler, a.k.a. humorist Ian Shoales, says George Bush is no Ronald Reagan, "but that may be a point in his favor. " Fred Travalena's take on the president-elect is Bush whistling "Be Happy, Don't Worry," with apologies to Bobby McFerrin. And on Harry Shearer's answering machine is a dead-ringer imitation of Bush saying, "This is going to be a kinder, gentler message. " The political humorists and comedians wasted no time in lending their two bits on the outcome of Tuesday's election.
NEWS
June 30, 1995 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
MIRROR BALL Neil Young and Pearl Jam / Reprise 1/2 Gaze into the light, man, and turn back the clock with the ageless Neil Young and his saddlepals from Pearl Jam, the unbilled back-up band on Young's cool new album "Mirror Ball. " Dressed down in a plain brown cardboard sleeve that's illustrated with the ceiling fixture from the old Fillmore Ballroom, this low-profile but head- buzzing presentation is late '60s in sound and spirit. At the core, it's pushing the "we're only in it for the music," "live free" and "save ourselves" messages that Young has long espoused and Pearl Jam has likewise embraced.
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Harry Shearer wants you to know the real Richard Nixon. Not the one-dimensional political trickster, but a more complex character touched with pathos. Shearer will host an interactive conversation/screening at World Café Live on Monday night of his latest Nixon interpretation, the British TV series Nixon's the One , with a script that re-creates actual audiotaped conversations from the White House. The six-part series premiered in the United States on YouTube on Tuesday and will continue with new episodes each Tuesday through Dec. 2. The celebrated improvisational comic actor, who grew up in California, has been impersonating the 37th president since the late 1960s, when he joined the Credibility Gap, a Los Angeles comedy troupe.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When Welsh singer Judith Owen moved to Los Angeles with her husband, comic actor and radio host Harry Shearer, in the 1990s, she found she wasn't so fond of sunny southern California during the holiday season. "I was feeling quite depressed because it all looked so lovely and I couldn't actually cope with Christmas in a hot, beautiful place," Owen says. She and Shearer are on a transatlantic conversation on her iPad from their home in London. "It made me feel terrible, and yearn to be somewhere that's dark and miserable.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2009 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
It's been 25 years since Spinal Tap launched its hilariously disastrous, albeit fictional, North American tour in support of its equally ill-fated and fictional album, Smell the Glove. Mercifully, the band's Unwigged & Unplugged tour - which touched down Thursday night at the Keswick Theatre in Glenside - seems to be going much better: rave reviews and sold-out theaters without a single drummer losing his life, all of which is a big step up from second billing to a puppet show at an amusement park or the Air Force base-dance circuit.
NEWS
February 1, 1997 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
In this episode of "The Simpsons," actor Harry Shearer plays himself. Often, Shearer provides the voice for Smithers, Principal Skinner or the Rev. Lovejoy on the popular cartoon show. But for O.J. Simpson's civil trial, he is a reporter of sorts for Microsoft's Internet magazine, Slate, and a commentator for a local radio station's NPR broadcast. The way Shearer sees it, he's gone from one cartoon to another. "Every year this city plays host to the Cirque de Soleil," the affable 52-year-old comedian said the other day. "This is a far superior circus.
NEWS
October 9, 2011
Protest disrupts D.C. air museum WASHINGTON - The National Air and Space Museum was closed Saturday after antiwar demonstrators tried to enter the building to protest a drone exhibit, and at least one person was pepper-sprayed. Smithsonian spokesman John Gibbons said a large group of demonstrators, estimated at 100 to 200 people, arrived about 3 p.m. and tried to enter the museum on the National Mall. When a security guard stopped the group, saying they could not bring in signs, he was apparently held by demonstrators, Gibbons said.
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NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
INADVERTENTLY just in time for Halloween, multimedia funnyman Harry Shearer is ringing America's doorbell with what he calls the "strangest, creepiest, funniest, spookiest" character he's ever played. Charles Montgomery Burns, the millionaire-boss-from-hell who Shearer has voiced on Fox's "The Simpsons" for the last 24 years? Hardly. Instead, the 70-year-old Shearer's six-part "Nixon's the One" series - which debuted for a U.S. audience this week on YouTube - tackles what the comedian and actor agreed is "the Great Dark Whale" of his baby-boomer generation: 37th president Richard Nixon, who resigned in disgrace 40 years ago. On Monday, Shearer hits Philadelphia's World Cafe Live for a special, interactive show that mixes clips of the series - which aired earlier this year in the United Kingdom - with tales of his half-century fascination with Nixon and a question-and-answer session.
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Harry Shearer wants you to know the real Richard Nixon. Not the one-dimensional political trickster, but a more complex character touched with pathos. Shearer will host an interactive conversation/screening at World Café Live on Monday night of his latest Nixon interpretation, the British TV series Nixon's the One , with a script that re-creates actual audiotaped conversations from the White House. The six-part series premiered in the United States on YouTube on Tuesday and will continue with new episodes each Tuesday through Dec. 2. The celebrated improvisational comic actor, who grew up in California, has been impersonating the 37th president since the late 1960s, when he joined the Credibility Gap, a Los Angeles comedy troupe.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
When Welsh singer Judith Owen moved to Los Angeles with her husband, comic actor and radio host Harry Shearer, in the 1990s, she found she wasn't so fond of sunny southern California during the holiday season. "I was feeling quite depressed because it all looked so lovely and I couldn't actually cope with Christmas in a hot, beautiful place," Owen says. She and Shearer are on a transatlantic conversation on her iPad from their home in London. "It made me feel terrible, and yearn to be somewhere that's dark and miserable.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2012
Conan (11 p.m., TBS) - Will Arnett; Harry Shearer. Late Show With David Letterman (11:35 p.m., CBS3) - Singer Taylor Swift. The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (11:35 p.m., NBC10) - Denzel Washington; Richard Engel; M. Ward performs. Jimmy Kimmel Live (midnight, 6ABC) - Comic Russell Peters; Prince performs.
NEWS
October 12, 2011 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
On what would have been John Lennon's 71st birthday (see below), Sir Paul McCartney , 69, wed skweezie Nancy Shevell , 51, Sunday, at a civil ceremony in Marylebone, central London. His third; her second. They'll throw a party Stateside later. Mac's daughter Beatrice was flower girl and his bro Mike was best male. Shevell wore a Stella McCartney dress, and Paul wore a blue suit. He gave her a 5-carat Neil Lane diamond in a platinum ring. Ringo Starr was there, with wife Barbara Bach , George Harrison's widow Olivia , Shevell's son Arlen , and her cousin, Barbara Walters . Wait . . . now Baba Wawa is sort of related to Paul?
NEWS
October 9, 2011
Protest disrupts D.C. air museum WASHINGTON - The National Air and Space Museum was closed Saturday after antiwar demonstrators tried to enter the building to protest a drone exhibit, and at least one person was pepper-sprayed. Smithsonian spokesman John Gibbons said a large group of demonstrators, estimated at 100 to 200 people, arrived about 3 p.m. and tried to enter the museum on the National Mall. When a security guard stopped the group, saying they could not bring in signs, he was apparently held by demonstrators, Gibbons said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2009 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
It's been 25 years since Spinal Tap launched its hilariously disastrous, albeit fictional, North American tour in support of its equally ill-fated and fictional album, Smell the Glove. Mercifully, the band's Unwigged & Unplugged tour - which touched down Thursday night at the Keswick Theatre in Glenside - seems to be going much better: rave reviews and sold-out theaters without a single drummer losing his life, all of which is a big step up from second billing to a puppet show at an amusement park or the Air Force base-dance circuit.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2003 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The triple bill at the Tower comprises the New Main Street Singers, the Folksmen, and Mitch and Mickey. Haven't heard of them? That's because they don't exist. They're the faux-folkie acts from Christopher Guest's gentle musical spoof, A Mighty Wind. Now the troupe that put the hoot in hootenanny is taking it on the road for a handful of East Coast appearances, beginning with tonight's acoustic jamboree in Upper Darby. What are we to make of actors such as Eugene Levy, Catherine O'Hara, Parker Posey, Harry Shearer and Michael McKean singing songs such as "Blood on the Coal" and "Potato's in the Paddy Wagon" that are both anachronistic and apocryphal?
NEWS
August 3, 2000 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
Sure, they talk about "inclusion," but don't expect to see Spinal Tap play at the Republican National Convention. Or for that matter, a keynote address by Wayland Smithers. The GOP shindig is strictly a Paul Anka-Montgomery Burns type of affair, which might explain why a comedian like Harry Shearer is in town to make fun of it. "What convention? I haven't seen a convention. I've seen a bad infomercial," says Shearer, the former "Saturday Night Live" cast member and the inspiration of Smithers on "The Simpsons" and bassist Derek Smalls of Tap. "This is like the Jerry Lewis telethon - after Jerry stopped taking Percodan.
NEWS
February 1, 1997 | by Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writer
In this episode of "The Simpsons," actor Harry Shearer plays himself. Often, Shearer provides the voice for Smithers, Principal Skinner or the Rev. Lovejoy on the popular cartoon show. But for O.J. Simpson's civil trial, he is a reporter of sorts for Microsoft's Internet magazine, Slate, and a commentator for a local radio station's NPR broadcast. The way Shearer sees it, he's gone from one cartoon to another. "Every year this city plays host to the Cirque de Soleil," the affable 52-year-old comedian said the other day. "This is a far superior circus.
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