CollectionsHarvard Law School
IN THE NEWS

Harvard Law School

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 24, 1998 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Linda Wright Moore contributed to this report
Sure, she was dumped before she got a hearing to run the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department. But Harvard University seems to think Lani Guinier has the right stuff. Yesterday, the university gushingly announced that Guinier will become a tenured professor at Harvard Law School. She is the first woman of color to join the tenured faculty. "She is a gifted and extraordinarily effective teacher, as the students who had her when she visited here will attest," said Law School Dean Robert Clark.
NEWS
June 20, 1995 | By Acel Moore
Under most circumstances, Earl Matthews is one cool customer, but he was nervous last Thursday as he entered a reception room in the Hotel Atop the Bellevue. The room was filled with Philadelphia lawyers and judges, some of the most prominent men and women of the city's legal establishment, and many of them heroes to young Matthews. Matthews was so uptight that he didn't eat a morsel of food all afternoon during the reception or luncheon that followed - the Philadelphia Bar Association's quarterly meeting and luncheon.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2010
9 tonight HBO Documentary on Hilde Back, a Swedish preschool teacher whose sponsorship of a young Kenyan student, Chris Mburu (right), helped him attend Harvard Law School and become a U.N. human rights advocate.
NEWS
January 11, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
DAVID BRAVERMAN, a distinguished Philadelphia lawyer, and Richard Posner, a distinguished jurist and philosopher, had maintained a longtime correspondence since their student days at Harvard. What did they write about? Cats. "Their correspondence mostly concerned their love of cats," said David Braverman's son, William. "Here was this supersmart Philadelphia lawyer and supersmart judge and what they wrote about was cats. " David Braverman, a trusts and estates lawyer who recently specialized in health-care litigation, a proud retired Marine and a hiker who liked to test himself on the Appalachian Trail, died Wednesday of heart failure.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Born: May 25, 1946, in Chicago Education: Cornell University, University of Chicago Experience: Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals, Washington, D.C. Assistant attorney general for antitrust, Justice Department Administrator for information and regulatory affairs, Office of Management and Budget Deputy assistant attorney general for antitrust, Justice Department Professor, Harvard Law School, specializing...
NEWS
May 20, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
David E. Kenty, 65, of Bryn Mawr, who retired in October 2010 as a partner in the tax and wealth-management department of the Philadelphia law firm Schnader, Harrison, Segal & Lewis, died of brain cancer Tuesday, May 17, at home. Nicholas J. LePore, Schnader managing partner, said in a statement: "David was an incredibly talented attorney, a dedicated professional. . . . I know his spirit and counsel will truly be missed. " Born in Columbus, Ohio, Mr. Kenty graduated from Newark (Ohio)
NEWS
February 23, 2004 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
H. Ober Hess, 91, a Philadelphia lawyer whose civic contributions spanned more than five decades, died Wednesday at his home in Gladwyne. Born in Upper Providence Township, Mr. Hess attended Collegeville High School. He graduated magna cum laude from Ursinus College in 1933 and went on to Harvard Law School, where he graduated cum laude in 1936. He received honorary doctorates from Ursinus, Muhlenberg College, and the Philadelphia College of Art. In 1940, he married Dolores Groke Hess, who died two years ago after 61 years of marriage.
NEWS
May 11, 2010 | By Tom Goldstein
Here is how Solicitor General Elena Kagan's path to succeed Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens is likely to play out, in terms of the most prominent lines of support for and attack against the nomination. 1. Qualifications; breadth and depth of experience. Kagan has never been a judge. She has spent very little time as an advocate. Her exposure to the judicial process is thus largely academic. On the other hand, she held significant positions in the Clinton administration's domestic policy operation.
NEWS
October 22, 2010
Paul Miller, 49, a lawyer who was born with achondroplasia - dwarfism - who overcame discrimination to become a leader in the disability-rights movement, died Tuesday at his home on Mercer Island, Wash. The cause was cancer, said his wife, Jennifer. More than 40 times after graduating from the University of Pennsylvania and the Harvard Law School, Mr. Miller received rejection letters from law firms. One time, he said, he was told the firm feared that clients would see his hiring as a "circus freak show.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1993 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An art historian with a Harvard law degree and a background in archaeology has been named director of the Rosenbach Museum and Library, the collection of rare books and manuscripts established in the house of the celebrated book dealer A.S.W. Rosenbach and his art-dealer brother, Philip, at 2010 Delancey Place. The new director, Stephen K. Urice, served most recently as deputy director and counsel of the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation in Los Angeles. He succeeds Ellen Dunlap, who left the museum last fall to become director of the American Antiquarian Society.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 19, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore Ruger, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School since 2004, has been appointed dean of the law school, effective July 1. Ruger, 46, who teaches constitutional law and health-related law and regulation, succeeds Michael A. Fitts, who left in July to become president of Tulane University. Wendell Pritchett has been interim dean and will continue as a professor on the faculties of the law school and the Graduate School of Education. Pritchett, 50, taught at Penn Law from 2001 to 2009, when he left to become chancellor of Rutgers-Camden.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crowded with Washington-bound commuters, the Track 5 platform beneath 30th Street Station was swept by a cold wind as Ron Levine stamped his feet and blew into his hands to stay warm. On this unusually icy November day last year, Levine, a prominent white-collar defense lawyer and a former prosecutor in the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia, and his colleague, Abe Rein, were on their way to the nation's capital. There, they would meet with other lawyers to fine-tune arguments in a Supreme Court case.
NEWS
December 6, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack C. Briscoe, 94, of Drexel Hill, a longtime Philadelphia lawyer and a professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania, died Monday, Dec. 1, of heart failure at the Sunrise of Granite Run senior living home in Media. Born in 1920 in Bradford, Pa., Mr. Briscoe was the son of an oil industry worker, Park H., and a homemaker, Gertrude. Mr. Briscoe graduated from Bradford High School in 1937 before attending the University of Pennsylvania. To help pay for the cost of tuition, Mr. Briscoe worked as a locomotive fireman on the Pennsylvania Railroad Seashore Line.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Former state Supreme Court Justice John E. Wallace Jr., who left the court after Gov. Christie refused to renominate him in 2010, has been chosen by Democratic legislative leaders to chair a committee that reviews ethics complaints against lawmakers. Wallace, a Gloucester County resident who was the only African American on the seven-member court, will replace Alan Rosenthal - a Rutgers University professor who died last month - as chairman of the Joint Legislative Committee on Ethical Standards.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | Michael Smerconish
David Maraniss reminds us that there is no substitute for primary-source reporting in his new book, Barack Obama: The Story. Last week, Maraniss told me that he spent nearly four years researching and writing the book, during which time he logged 50,000 miles, conducted close to 400 interviews, and searched libraries on three continents. The result is a biography of more than 600 pages that ends with Obama's acceptance to Harvard Law School.   While Maraniss told me that his goal was not to vet the president's own memoir, many readers will be tempted to focus on the contradictions between The Story and Dreams From My Father.
NEWS
May 20, 2012 | By George Parry
In the earliest iteration of the Third Reich's Nuremberg Laws, people with three or four Jewish grandparents were classified as Jews and stripped of their livelihoods and property. Individuals with one or two Jewish grandparents were deemed to be "crossbreeds" who were entitled, under certain conditions, to less discriminatory treatment. Terrible? Of course. But recent events have demonstrated that America's academic community operates under an even more precise and exacting racial code.
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | George Parry is a former state and federal prosecutor practicing law in Philadelphia
Despite 40 years of practicing law, I am no expert when it comes to arguing appeals. But I do know enough not to gratuitously insult and try to humiliate the appellate judges who will decide my client's case. Apparently they don't teach those fundamentals at Harvard Law School. How else to explain the absolutely boneheaded attempts by President Obama, a past president of the Harvard Law Review, to intimidate the U.S. Supreme Court as it decides the constitutional fate of Obamacare?
BUSINESS
February 5, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
William A. Graham IV had lunch the other day with George Norcross III , his cut-throat rival in the insurance brokerage and consulting business. Norcross brought up the day, 17 years ago, when Norcross' then-business patron, Commerce Bank chief Vernon Hill , called Graham to ask how much money he'd have to pay to buy the Graham Co. "I might consider it - if you told me you might pay $85 million," Graham had told Hill. A "ridiculously" high price, Graham figured, nearly three times his annual sales.
NEWS
August 27, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard Wolfman, 87, the University of Pennsylvania Law School dean from 1970 to 1975, died of heart failure Saturday, Aug. 20, while visiting a relative in West Orange, N.J. He resided in Cambridge, Mass. Michael A. Fitts, current Penn Law dean, wrote in an appreciation on the Penn Law website: "For more than 60 years, Bernie was a highly distinguished tax academic and expert - as well as a very loyal Penn alumnus. He will be greatly missed. " Mr. Wolfman went on to be Fessenden Professor of Law at Harvard Law School from 1976 to 2007.
NEWS
June 25, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Arnold R. Ginsburg, 94, a lawyer in Philadelphia for more than 60 years and a leader in the Jewish community, died Friday, June 24, at his home in Center City. In the mid-1950s, Mr. Ginsburg established a solo practice in Philadelphia, specializing in corporate law. In the 1960s, he was counsel and served on the board of the Philadelphia Transportation Co. During his career, he appeared before the Supreme Court four times, his son Leonard said. One case he argued before the justices involved a dispute between a tractor dealer in Kennett Square and the Ford Motor Co. A lower court had awarded $6 million to his client, the dealer, but the award was overturned on appeal to the Supreme Court in 1986.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|