CollectionsHarvard Law School
IN THE NEWS

Harvard Law School

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 24, 1998 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Linda Wright Moore contributed to this report
Sure, she was dumped before she got a hearing to run the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department. But Harvard University seems to think Lani Guinier has the right stuff. Yesterday, the university gushingly announced that Guinier will become a tenured professor at Harvard Law School. She is the first woman of color to join the tenured faculty. "She is a gifted and extraordinarily effective teacher, as the students who had her when she visited here will attest," said Law School Dean Robert Clark.
NEWS
June 20, 1995 | By Acel Moore
Under most circumstances, Earl Matthews is one cool customer, but he was nervous last Thursday as he entered a reception room in the Hotel Atop the Bellevue. The room was filled with Philadelphia lawyers and judges, some of the most prominent men and women of the city's legal establishment, and many of them heroes to young Matthews. Matthews was so uptight that he didn't eat a morsel of food all afternoon during the reception or luncheon that followed - the Philadelphia Bar Association's quarterly meeting and luncheon.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2010
9 tonight HBO Documentary on Hilde Back, a Swedish preschool teacher whose sponsorship of a young Kenyan student, Chris Mburu (right), helped him attend Harvard Law School and become a U.N. human rights advocate.
NEWS
June 9, 2016
The state of Delaware said Tuesday that it would phase in a new policy to treat all hepatitis C patients in its Medicaid program. States have been under pressure from the Obama Administration and lawsuits - in Delaware's case, Harvard Law School's Center for Health Law & Policy Innovation had threatened litigation - to abandon money-saving policies that limited treatment with effective but costly new medications to the sickest patients. More than three million Americans are estimated to be infected with hepatitis C, a bloodborne virus that may cause no symptoms for decades but is the leading cause of liver cancer and transplants.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
Born: May 25, 1946, in Chicago Education: Cornell University, University of Chicago Experience: Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals, Washington, D.C. Assistant attorney general for antitrust, Justice Department Administrator for information and regulatory affairs, Office of Management and Budget Deputy assistant attorney general for antitrust, Justice Department Professor, Harvard Law School, specializing...
NEWS
June 15, 2010 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - Hunched over the telephone in his office two blocks from the White House, Bill Coleman offers sage advice born of years whispering into the ears of presidents and prime ministers. He tells the organizer of a Trilateral Commission conference on Europe's burgeoning financial crisis that it would be distracting if Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton attended. "I was tempted to call the secretary of state and ask her to send one of her key people," Coleman says.
NEWS
February 23, 2004 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
H. Ober Hess, 91, a Philadelphia lawyer whose civic contributions spanned more than five decades, died Wednesday at his home in Gladwyne. Born in Upper Providence Township, Mr. Hess attended Collegeville High School. He graduated magna cum laude from Ursinus College in 1933 and went on to Harvard Law School, where he graduated cum laude in 1936. He received honorary doctorates from Ursinus, Muhlenberg College, and the Philadelphia College of Art. In 1940, he married Dolores Groke Hess, who died two years ago after 61 years of marriage.
NEWS
December 22, 2015
Walter Leonard, 86, who designed an admissions process at Harvard University that led to more minority students, died this month. Mr. Leonard's wife, Betty Leonard, said he had complications from Alzheimer's disease. In 1971, Mr. Leonard was named as a special assistant to Harvard president Derek Bok. Mr. Leonard had already worked as an assistant dean at Harvard Law School, where he was credited with increasing the number of black, Latino, and female students. The admissions formula he created for the entire university included race or ethnicity as a plus, among other factors.
NEWS
December 15, 2015 | Staff report
Mayor-elect Jim Kenney will formally announce the appointment of Sozi Pedro Tulante as Philadelphia's next city solicitor. An assistant U.S. Attorney since 2010, Tulante has been making the rounds at City Hall introducing himself as Kenney's intended pick for the position. Kenney will make his formal announcement at a City Hall news conference Monday. Tulante was born and spent most of his childhood in Zaire, now known as the Democratic Republic of Congo, before his family came to the United States as political refugees in 1983.
NEWS
May 11, 2010 | By Tom Goldstein
Here is how Solicitor General Elena Kagan's path to succeed Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens is likely to play out, in terms of the most prominent lines of support for and attack against the nomination. 1. Qualifications; breadth and depth of experience. Kagan has never been a judge. She has spent very little time as an advocate. Her exposure to the judicial process is thus largely academic. On the other hand, she held significant positions in the Clinton administration's domestic policy operation.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 9, 2016
The state of Delaware said Tuesday that it would phase in a new policy to treat all hepatitis C patients in its Medicaid program. States have been under pressure from the Obama Administration and lawsuits - in Delaware's case, Harvard Law School's Center for Health Law & Policy Innovation had threatened litigation - to abandon money-saving policies that limited treatment with effective but costly new medications to the sickest patients. More than three million Americans are estimated to be infected with hepatitis C, a bloodborne virus that may cause no symptoms for decades but is the leading cause of liver cancer and transplants.
NEWS
December 22, 2015
Walter Leonard, 86, who designed an admissions process at Harvard University that led to more minority students, died this month. Mr. Leonard's wife, Betty Leonard, said he had complications from Alzheimer's disease. In 1971, Mr. Leonard was named as a special assistant to Harvard president Derek Bok. Mr. Leonard had already worked as an assistant dean at Harvard Law School, where he was credited with increasing the number of black, Latino, and female students. The admissions formula he created for the entire university included race or ethnicity as a plus, among other factors.
NEWS
December 15, 2015 | Staff report
Mayor-elect Jim Kenney will formally announce the appointment of Sozi Pedro Tulante as Philadelphia's next city solicitor. An assistant U.S. Attorney since 2010, Tulante has been making the rounds at City Hall introducing himself as Kenney's intended pick for the position. Kenney will make his formal announcement at a City Hall news conference Monday. Tulante was born and spent most of his childhood in Zaire, now known as the Democratic Republic of Congo, before his family came to the United States as political refugees in 1983.
NEWS
October 21, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph E. Irenas, 75, of Princeton, a senior U.S. judge for the district of New Jersey, died Friday, Oct. 16, at Cooper University Medical Center after a fall earlier in the week, the U.S. District Court for New Jersey has announced. A colleague, District Judge Robert B. Kugler, said in an interview that Judge Irenas "was absolutely dedicated to the District Court of New Jersey. " "He worked as hard as anybody," Kugler said. "He loved his job. He loved coming to court. " Kugler said he had known the judge for 23 years, going onto the bench shortly after Judge Irenas joined it 1992.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Theodore Ruger, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School since 2004, has been appointed dean of the law school, effective July 1. Ruger, 46, who teaches constitutional law and health-related law and regulation, succeeds Michael A. Fitts, who left in July to become president of Tulane University. Wendell Pritchett has been interim dean and will continue as a professor on the faculties of the law school and the Graduate School of Education. Pritchett, 50, taught at Penn Law from 2001 to 2009, when he left to become chancellor of Rutgers-Camden.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crowded with Washington-bound commuters, the Track 5 platform beneath 30th Street Station was swept by a cold wind as Ron Levine stamped his feet and blew into his hands to stay warm. On this unusually icy November day last year, Levine, a prominent white-collar defense lawyer and a former prosecutor in the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia, and his colleague, Abe Rein, were on their way to the nation's capital. There, they would meet with other lawyers to fine-tune arguments in a Supreme Court case.
NEWS
December 6, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack C. Briscoe, 94, of Drexel Hill, a longtime Philadelphia lawyer and a professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania, died Monday, Dec. 1, of heart failure at the Sunrise of Granite Run senior living home in Media. Born in 1920 in Bradford, Pa., Mr. Briscoe was the son of an oil industry worker, Park H., and a homemaker, Gertrude. Mr. Briscoe graduated from Bradford High School in 1937 before attending the University of Pennsylvania. To help pay for the cost of tuition, Mr. Briscoe worked as a locomotive fireman on the Pennsylvania Railroad Seashore Line.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Former state Supreme Court Justice John E. Wallace Jr., who left the court after Gov. Christie refused to renominate him in 2010, has been chosen by Democratic legislative leaders to chair a committee that reviews ethics complaints against lawmakers. Wallace, a Gloucester County resident who was the only African American on the seven-member court, will replace Alan Rosenthal - a Rutgers University professor who died last month - as chairman of the Joint Legislative Committee on Ethical Standards.
NEWS
July 2, 2012 | Michael Smerconish
David Maraniss reminds us that there is no substitute for primary-source reporting in his new book, Barack Obama: The Story. Last week, Maraniss told me that he spent nearly four years researching and writing the book, during which time he logged 50,000 miles, conducted close to 400 interviews, and searched libraries on three continents. The result is a biography of more than 600 pages that ends with Obama's acceptance to Harvard Law School.   While Maraniss told me that his goal was not to vet the president's own memoir, many readers will be tempted to focus on the contradictions between The Story and Dreams From My Father.
NEWS
May 20, 2012 | By George Parry
In the earliest iteration of the Third Reich's Nuremberg Laws, people with three or four Jewish grandparents were classified as Jews and stripped of their livelihoods and property. Individuals with one or two Jewish grandparents were deemed to be "crossbreeds" who were entitled, under certain conditions, to less discriminatory treatment. Terrible? Of course. But recent events have demonstrated that America's academic community operates under an even more precise and exacting racial code.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|