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Harvey Cedars

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NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A Harvey Cedars, N.J., couple locked in a long-running legal battle with the borough after it built a protective sand dune on part of their property have settled the case for $1, state officials announced Wednesday. Meanwhile, Gov. Christie ordered the state Attorney General's Office to "immediately take action" to obtain easements from landowners to build more protective dunes along the shoreline in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. "We can no longer be held back from completing these critical projects by a small number of owners who are selfishly concerned about their view while putting large swaths of homes and businesses around them at risk," Christie said in a statement.
NEWS
July 6, 1998 | By Carrie Budoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The violent explosion that injured at least nine people during a Fourth of July fireworks show happened after embers ignited backup fireworks sitting in Igloo coolers. Two people - a firefighter with the High Point Volunteer Fire Company and a pyrotechnician - remained hospitalized yesterday. The cause of the Saturday night blast was still being investigated by the Ocean County fire marshal, but members of the pyrotechnics team and the police and fire departments offered explanations yesterday for the accident at Sunset Park along Barnegat Bay. "We had an explosion on the ground, and it should have been in the air," said Police Chief Thomas LaNeve of Harvey Cedars.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JIM GRAHAM took a sad walk in Harvey Cedars on Long Beach Island this week. He walked to Turtle Point, the beach home of his longtime friend, Larry Teacher, and took photographs of the little stone animals out front and the house where so much of Larry's heart and soul reposed for many years. Jim was having a difficult time realizing that his friend was shockingly gone. He had had a three-hour lunch with Larry on Monday at Parc, the Rittenhouse Square brasserie, where Larry seemed to be his usual jocular self, full of jokes and humor, kidding with the waitresses and fighting over the check.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sand dunes created to protect the Jersey Shore may be worth more than an unobstructed view of ocean. However, it is up to a jury to decide how much, if any, a Harvey Cedars couple should receive after a large piece of their property was taken by the state to construct 22-foot dunes that also blocked part of their view of Long Beach Island's surf. The New Jersey Supreme Court on Monday tossed out a $375,000 jury award to Harvey and Phyllis Karan in the case filed five years ago, sending it back to Ocean County for a new trial.
NEWS
August 25, 1996 | By Eddie Olsen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officials yesterday reopened beaches on Long Beach Island that had been closed after as many as 30,000 dead fish had floated ashore. Although the beaches were cleared of fish yesterday, officials said that in all, up to 60,000 fish had accidentally spilled from an offshore bait boat and that further restrictions were possible if more carcasses washed ashore. Several beaches were closed Thursday and Friday after the spill, which occurred Thursday, when the 60,000 menhaden, also known as "bunker," spilled from ripped netting.
NEWS
July 7, 2013 | Associated Press
TRENTON - New Jersey's top court said Friday it will issue its opinion Monday on whether homeowners should be compensated for losing ocean views when dunes are built. The high court's decision will come in the widely watched case of a Long Beach Island couple who sued and won a jury verdict for $375,000 to make up for the view they lost when their town built a dune in 2010. The town, Harvey Cedars, appealed, saying that a house protected from a flood is more valuable than one that is not. The house at the center of the case, belonging to Harvey and Phyllis Karan, survived Sandy in October.
NEWS
February 24, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harvey Cedars Mayor Jonathan Oldham calls his town "a poster child" for why he thinks building dunes and replenishing beaches along the New Jersey coast are really good ideas. More than two million cubic yards of sand were pumped onto Harvey Cedars' mile-long beachfront in 2010. And like the rest of Long Beach Island, the town suffered extensive flooding and residential and commercial property damage when Hurricane Sandy roared ashore Oct. 29, 2012, and created a $68 billion disaster up and down the coast.
NEWS
June 20, 2004 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was under cover of darkness - or at least low tide - when Blaise McArdle last appeared at the nuns' beach in Harvey Cedars. It was 3 a.m., and the scientist from Bethlehem, Pa. was there to cart off some of his sand for testing. He can tell which is his sand, you see, because it has been treated with a liquid mixture McArdle calls SAND-Rx, which he says will stop beach erosion faster than you can say U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. You laugh. Others have. But the nuns - who have watched their little sliver of beach grow narrower and steeper over the years - are believers in the powers of SAND-Rx.
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - In a case with wide implications for Shore restoration following Hurricane Sandy, the state Supreme Court heard an appeal Monday of a $375,000 jury award to a Long Beach Island couple who said construction of a barrier dune in 2010 deprived them of their ocean view. The Army Corps of Engineers built a 22-foot-high dune for storm protection in front of Phyllis and Harvey Karan's house after Harvey Cedars condemned a portion of their beach five years ago. A Superior Court jury awarded the couple damages in 2011, finding that the dune construction, while benefiting many of the surrounding homeowners, had substantially diminished the value of the Karans' $1.9 million home.
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | Associated Press
TRENTON - A court ruling that upheld a $375,000 judgment for oceanfront homeowners in an eminent-domain dispute could jeopardize beach-replenishment projects in one of the Jersey Shore's most vulnerable areas, a lawyer involved in the case said Tuesday. The appellate ruling Monday upheld the award to a couple in Harvey Cedars, Long Beach Island, site of a $22 million beach replenishment aimed at minimizing storm damage. Harvey and Phyllis Karan had argued during the trial last year that a 22-foot dune built on their property obliterated their ocean view and lowered the value of their $1.9 million property by $500,000.
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NEWS
February 24, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harvey Cedars Mayor Jonathan Oldham calls his town "a poster child" for why he thinks building dunes and replenishing beaches along the New Jersey coast are really good ideas. More than two million cubic yards of sand were pumped onto Harvey Cedars' mile-long beachfront in 2010. And like the rest of Long Beach Island, the town suffered extensive flooding and residential and commercial property damage when Hurricane Sandy roared ashore Oct. 29, 2012, and created a $68 billion disaster up and down the coast.
NEWS
May 27, 2014 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The members of the iconic Beach Haven Marlin & Tuna Club were determined to open their new building before the start of summer, the second since Hurricane Sandy washed out their former home. They got their certificate of occupancy Friday afternoon, just in time for a planned grand opening the next day, coinciding with an annual striper fishing tournament known as the LBI Cup. On Sunday morning, the day after 500 people flooded the club's new three-story headquarters, Vice Commodore Tim Irons walked around the bare rooms, proudly showing off the bathroom tiling and the views from the top floor.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JIM GRAHAM took a sad walk in Harvey Cedars on Long Beach Island this week. He walked to Turtle Point, the beach home of his longtime friend, Larry Teacher, and took photographs of the little stone animals out front and the house where so much of Larry's heart and soul reposed for many years. Jim was having a difficult time realizing that his friend was shockingly gone. He had had a three-hour lunch with Larry on Monday at Parc, the Rittenhouse Square brasserie, where Larry seemed to be his usual jocular self, full of jokes and humor, kidding with the waitresses and fighting over the check.
NEWS
November 10, 2013 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
MARGATE, N.J. - Voters in this resort south of Atlantic City have rejected a plan for a dune project, despite Sandy's thrashing of the Jersey Shore a year ago - when in hours, one storm washed away as much sand from the beaches and dunes as it normally would take a decade to remove. In Tuesday's election, 65 percent of the 2,292 residents who cast ballots said no to the $20 million Army Corps of Engineers' fully federally funded project. The corps wants to construct 12-foot-high dunes along the 1.5-mile-long beachfront.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A Harvey Cedars, N.J., couple locked in a long-running legal battle with the borough after it built a protective sand dune on part of their property have settled the case for $1, state officials announced Wednesday. Meanwhile, Gov. Christie ordered the state Attorney General's Office to "immediately take action" to obtain easements from landowners to build more protective dunes along the shoreline in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. "We can no longer be held back from completing these critical projects by a small number of owners who are selfishly concerned about their view while putting large swaths of homes and businesses around them at risk," Christie said in a statement.
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sand dunes created to protect the Jersey Shore may be worth more than an unobstructed view of ocean. However, it is up to a jury to decide how much, if any, a Harvey Cedars couple should receive after a large piece of their property was taken by the state to construct 22-foot dunes that also blocked part of their view of Long Beach Island's surf. The New Jersey Supreme Court on Monday tossed out a $375,000 jury award to Harvey and Phyllis Karan in the case filed five years ago, sending it back to Ocean County for a new trial.
NEWS
July 7, 2013 | Associated Press
TRENTON - New Jersey's top court said Friday it will issue its opinion Monday on whether homeowners should be compensated for losing ocean views when dunes are built. The high court's decision will come in the widely watched case of a Long Beach Island couple who sued and won a jury verdict for $375,000 to make up for the view they lost when their town built a dune in 2010. The town, Harvey Cedars, appealed, saying that a house protected from a flood is more valuable than one that is not. The house at the center of the case, belonging to Harvey and Phyllis Karan, survived Sandy in October.
NEWS
May 15, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - In a case with wide implications for Shore restoration following Hurricane Sandy, the state Supreme Court heard an appeal Monday of a $375,000 jury award to a Long Beach Island couple who said construction of a barrier dune in 2010 deprived them of their ocean view. The Army Corps of Engineers built a 22-foot-high dune for storm protection in front of Phyllis and Harvey Karan's house after Harvey Cedars condemned a portion of their beach five years ago. A Superior Court jury awarded the couple damages in 2011, finding that the dune construction, while benefiting many of the surrounding homeowners, had substantially diminished the value of the Karans' $1.9 million home.
NEWS
November 5, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Anthony R. Wood, and Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writers
New Jersey's coastline has been whacked. Entire beaches are gone - some swept into the towns that once bordered them. However, early indications are that areas with beach replenishment and dunes were spared the worst damage. "In fact, the dunes worked - in Avalon, North Wildwood, Stone Harbor," said Stewart Farrell, director of the Richard Stockton Coastal Research Center, which has been studying New Jersey's shore for 26 years. He found that on Long Beach Island, where dunes were built - in Harvey Cedars, Ship Bottom, and Surf City - damage was less.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hurricane Sandy may have made landfall in Atlantic City, but the communities to the north - especially on Long Beach Island - appeared from above to have taken the storm's hardest punch. A helicopter tour of the Shore from LBI to the Wildwoods on Tuesday showed all the communities that make up the region's ocean playground suffering some impact from Sandy. Street flooding, particularly bayside flooding, was a plague up and down the Shore, and beaches were eroded everywhere. But a half-day after Sandy pushed inland, LBI displayed the worst of the damage.
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