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Havana

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In Havana, Robert Redford gets more out of Cuba than he did out of Africa. In what begins as a classy reunion with Sydney Pollack - their last collaboration was the Oscar-laden Out of Africa (1985) - Redford's remarkably honest and open contribution proves a saving grace. Artistically, Havana follows the political course described by the revolution led by Fidel Castro. It commences in hope and promise, only to give way to confusion and disillusion. In this case, the fault lies not with the stars or Pollack, who has proved that he can work on the sweeping scale that Havana aspires to. The blame lies primarily with the screenplay by Judith Rascoe and David Rayfiel, which is all sizzle and no steak.
NEWS
October 16, 2006 | By Kevin L. Carter FOR THE INQUIRER
Sometimes it pays off to be a security guard at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As the Spirits of Havana band, a Canadian-Cuban collaboration, was doing a sound check Friday afternoon, Miguel Santos approached the Cuban conguero and timbale player and asked to jam. During the band's first set Friday night, Santos sat in on bongo during a descarga, and after the set, the former Orquesta Lucena member from North Philadelphia was radiant. Such is the power of Cuban music. Saxophonist Jane Bunnett, from Toronto, has devoted her energies to producing some of the most honest, intellectual Cuban-jazz fusion, and the now-infamous city of Guantanamo is where her sights are set now. On Friday, some of the most radically musical passages came when Bunnett was isolated, either in duo or during extended improvisations, with pianist Osmany Paredes, chiefly on "Lagrimas Negras" and "La Comparsa.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
American Airlines and seven other U.S. carriers won tentative government approval Thursday to fly nonstop to Havana, the Cuban capital. American will operate five daily flights -- four from Miami and one from Charlotte, N.C. Philadelphia travelers flying on American, which operates 433 daily flights and a hub here, will be able to connect through Miami or Charlotte to Havana. American said the Havana flights will go on sale later this month after the U.S. Transportation Department issues its final decision, with commercial service to begin in November.
NEWS
January 12, 1991 | By ROGER E. HERNANDEZ
I knew all about Robert Redford's new movie, Havana, before I walked into the theater. As a matter of fact, I could have told you the plot right from the moment I first heard a movie was being shot about the last days before the Castro revolution: Hard-bitten American goes to Havana, pursues decadence, finds violence, falls in love with beautiful radical, discovers his true self, revolution brings redemption for all, The End. I was right....
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2012 | BY CHUCK DARROW, darrowc@phillynews.com 215-313-3134
GUILLERMO Pernot may be Argentinean by birth, but his heart and palate belong to Cuba. It's not just that Pernot's wife, Lucia, is a native Cuban whose family escaped Fidel Castro's communist regime in 1959 when she was just 9 months old. The Caribbean island-nation is also home to cuisine that, as far as the 55-year-old chef-partner at Old City's Cuba Libre Restaurant & Rum Bar is concerned, is second-to-none. "It's a basic style of food," Pernot (pronounced per- NO )
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1988 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
What do you get when you cross Rocky and Bullwinkle and Bram Stoker and The Untouchables and plop it all down in Cuba, circa 1933? You get confused. You also get Vampires in Havana, a screwy animated feature about bloodsucking monsters, bloodsucking mobsters and bloodcurdling Fascist bureaucrats - all of them in hot, hairy pursuit of a trumpet-playing naif by the name of Joseph Emmanuel, a.k.a. Pepito. Written and directed by Juan Padron, Vampires in Havana is a fast, freewheeling comedic cartoon about gangland Draculas and a mysterious potion called Vampisol that enables the dagger-toothed nightstalkers to bask in sunlight just like us normal folks.
NEWS
April 30, 1998 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Who the Hell Is Juliette?" answers the question posed in its title, but raises another. What the heck is "Who the Hell Is Juliette?" Part documentary, part fiction, the movie fits no easy category. Mexican director Carlos Marcovich uses both forms to arrive at what he hopes is the truth about his subject, a Cuban teen-ager named Yuliet Ortega. Marcovich met Ortega in Havana, where he had traveled to film a music video. He hired her as an extra, and was captivated by her hard-luck story: abandoned as an infant by her father; her mother committed suicide soon after.
LIVING
January 7, 2001 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's a wintry night in the new Old City. Frosty winds slap street denizens like ice cubes tossed at a frat party. Coats are tucked as tight as bedsheets. Tucked, that is, until the door of Cuba Libre is reached. Then it's time for heat to escape like steam from a radiator. Old City's newest bistro, Cuba Libre - owned and operated by Larry Cohen and Barry Gutin of Egypt and Shampoo fame - is like a thermos, holding in moist heat while giving off sensuous aromas and spicy flavors.
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | By Frida Ghitis
The sad, dark eyes of Elian Gonzalez, framed behind a chain link fence, look into the gathering crowd in Havana. He looks like a tiny prisoner, and to thousands of Cubans, that is exactly what he is. They call him "The Kidnapped Child. " In the streets of Havana, where many today pointedly wear T-shirts with the legend "Liberen a Elian" (Free Elian), the case of Elian Gonzalez has become a symbol of U.S. injustice towards Cuba. To be sure, the demonstrations demanding his return are carefully organized by the government.
NEWS
January 4, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
After studying rare and exotic marine life in Cuban waters, a group of U.S. scientists captured the island's biggest fish. Fidel Castro boarded their boat in Havana on Friday night to learn about the monthlong expedition. "We've had a lot of surprises scientifically and culturally," environmental writer Bill Belleville said yesterday. "Fidel is vital for his age and very engaging. He wasn't just spouting rhetoric. He was genuinely interested in what we are doing. " Belleville is among 41 researchers and crew members conducting the first deep-water exploration near Cuba.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 15, 2016
Entrepreneurship might seem like an odd word to associate with Cuba, but it seems increasingly apt, given the individuals I met during a week traveling the island. From the tobacco fields three hours outside of Havana to downtown restaurants that rival the finest Philadelphia has to offer, one can find the seedlings of capitalism and businesses built for profit sprouting everywhere. Don't misunderstand. Cuba remains a nation of great disappointment and contradiction. Friendly people live amid spectacular scenery but are nevertheless trapped in a socialist system that never delivered on the promises of the revolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2016 | By John Timpane, Staff Writer
'What we do is a family thing," bassist Jojo Garza said near the end of a splendid set by Los Lonely Boys at Havana in New Hope on Saturday night. Family is the signature of this "Texican" power-trio. In addition to Jojo on bass, brother Henry, in his dark glasses and ponytail, is a god on guitar; brother Ringo Jr. completes the holy trinity on drums. They are a second-generation family band - father Ringo Sr. played for years with up to seven siblings in the Falcones. Family is power, and Los Lonely Boys shook Havana to its merry foundations.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
American Airlines and seven other U.S. carriers won tentative government approval Thursday to fly nonstop to Havana, the Cuban capital. American will operate five daily flights -- four from Miami and one from Charlotte, N.C. Philadelphia travelers flying on American, which operates 433 daily flights and a hub here, will be able to connect through Miami or Charlotte to Havana. American said the Havana flights will go on sale later this month after the U.S. Transportation Department issues its final decision, with commercial service to begin in November.
TRAVEL
June 27, 2016 | By Caroline Marques, For The Inquirer
It took about five minutes after landing in balmy Havana for things to go wrong. There were random questions at customs, an interminable wait to exchange money, and finally, the realization that no one from our confirmed casa particular was coming to meet us. That, combined with the fact that we were the only twentysomething tourists traveling among throngs of American missionaries and retirees, made for an interesting introduction to the city....
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
It will be George Gershwin in the Caribbean for the Philadelphia Boys Choir and Chorale this summer when they take their annual trip, this year to Cuba for 11 days, Aug. 10 to 21. Their repertoire will include a newly adapted choral version of Gershwin's Cuban Overture, with new lyrics by celebrated Cuban American poet - and presidential inaugural poet - Richard Blanco. The choir will give the public a taste of the piece at their annual concert Saturday at Verizon Hall. The evening also will have them take a musical jaunt to the beginning of space and time, with the world premiere of composer Robert S. Cohen's Genesis . It's a five-movement presentation of stories from the first book of the Bible, with a libretto by Maria V.S. Seigenthaler and Ronald W. Cadmus.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | John Timpane, Staff Writer
For a muralist, a big wall with nothing on it is like . . . a blank canvas as big as a parking lot. Michelle Angela Ortiz is a Philadelphia painter, performer, and writer - and a cultural envoy. On Sunday, she will fly to Cuba to help paint a large mural in Havana. She'll be there for 31/2 weeks, on a cultural exchange program organized by the Meridian International Center in Washington, a nongovernmental organization that works with the U.S. State Department. On Dec. 11, with a new grant from the State Department Bureau of Education and Public Affairs, Meridian sent representatives to Havana to meet with artists, gallery owners, foundations, and potential in-country participants - and to scout out a nice, big, blank wall.
NEWS
September 22, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
HAVANA - Crowds began forming before dawn Sunday to see Pope Francis, who is making his first visit to this poor island nation, celebrate Mass in Havana's famed Plaza de la Revolucion. Francis arrived about half an hour before the start of the Mass to circle the square in his Popemobile, pausing at times to kiss children and bless people in wheelchairs. Many in the crowd, estimated by the government at 100,000, waved Cuban, Vatican City, and Argentine flags, the last in honor of Francis' country of birth.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama's latest move to further relations with Cuba was barely off his lips when critics unloaded on the plan to open a U.S. embassy in Havana and permit Cuba to open one in Washington. "Today's announcement cannot be considered normalization ... if it fails to speak to key issues such as whether [the] U.S. government will be limited in the number of diplomats [or] if diplomatic mail can be searched and potentially seized by Cuban authorities," said Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.)
TRAVEL
April 27, 2015 | By Bill Iezzi, For The Inquirer
HAVANA - Jesus Escandel's brown eyes lit up like two Cuban cigars as he walked along the uncommonly smooth stone pavement and felt the fresh orange tile on the newly renovated building. Pushing open the swinging doors on Calle Animas, he stepped into a past when American gamblers, Hollywood stars, pro athletes, Mafia bosses, local politicians, and homegrown revolutionaries all once shared a legendary saloon called Sloppy Joe's. The first thing Escandel noticed was the bar to the left, 59 mahogany feet, once billed as the longest in Latin America.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
If it's Sunday, it must be Havana. The three members of the Philly artist collective named Las Gallas - something like "she-roosters" in Spanish - may well be saying that right now. On Saturday, Las Gallas jetted off to all-but-post-Castro Cuba for a week of workshopping with hip-hop artists, presenting their performance piece Ghetto Bolero , and doing tourist stuff ("We want to go dancing, of course," says Julia López of Las Gallas, "and...
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