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Hawk Mountain Sanctuary

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NEWS
August 19, 1997 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lewis Lehrer, 81, an anesthesiologist who worked in the Philadelphia area for a half century, died Friday at his home in Voorhees. Born in Altoona, Pa., Dr. Lehrer resided in Wyndmoor, Pa., before moving to Cherry Hill in 1967. He had lived in Voorhees since 1996. Dr. Lehrer was the chief anesthesiologist at Underwood-Memorial Hospital, Woodbury, between 1967 and 1980. During his career, he also worked at Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia General Hospital, Deborah Hospital, Kensington Hospital and Lower Bucks Hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1988 | By Scott Huler, Special to The Inquirer
On Sept. 17, 1978, about 21,000 hawks circled and swooped in the winds above the Kittatinny Ridge in northwestern Berks County in southeast-central Pennsylvania. A falconer's convention? An exodus from acid rain? An air traffic controllers' strike? No. Just an especially good day at the Hawk Mountain Sanctuary. The first sanctuary in the world dedicated to raptors, or birds of prey, is also one of the best places in eastern Pennsylvania to witness an avian rite of autumn.
NEWS
June 22, 2012 | By Ron Devlin, READING EAGLE
KEMPTON, Pa. - Exhausted but joyful, a bleary-eyed Elizabeth Christman stood in front of the Hawk Mountain Sanctuary visitor center in Berks County at 1 a.m. Thursday. "We're ecstatic," the 38-year-old Allentown occupational therapist said, speaking for her husband, Scott. "We feel joy and thankfulness. " Her father, Robert Durn, 74, of Allentown, and her two sons, Garrod, 9, and Griffen, 5, had been missing in a remote section of Hawk Mountain for more than eight hours before being found shortly before 12:01 a.m. Thursday.
NEWS
October 31, 1990 | By Pamela J. Podger, Special to The Inquirer
Michelle Kovack, a fall intern at Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, peered into a refrigerator and eyed a red plastic tub of thawing meat. "Guess they've been fed," she said, striding into the mews where about 10 maimed birds are kept. Kovack raised her gauntlet-clad arm and convinced a blind, red-tailed hawk, Amelia, to abandon her perch and come closer to where dinner waited. Amelia snatched dinner in her talons and tugged at the meat. For those who are rapt about raptors - hawks, ospreys, falcons and eagles - the three-month intern program is an up-close look at the birds that soar above Kittatinny Ridge and navigate south by the rugged Appalachian peaks.
NEWS
October 26, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a Sunday afternoon in 1932, Harold and Richard Pough and two friends went to a mountain in Berks County and changed the history of conservation. After the brothers saw hawk after hawk being shot while migrating, Harold returned to photograph the results of the slaughter and helped alert a benefactor. "His significance was that . . . his photographs ultimately led to the creation of the first refuge for birds of prey, in the world" - what is now Hawk Mountain Sanctuary - sanctuary spokeswoman Mary Linkevich said last week.
NEWS
October 2, 2004 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A priest, a minister and a rabbi were relaxing near the pinnacle when someone said to look up. They saw a bird - a magnificent hawk, spiraling higher and higher toward darkening clouds, an example of the glory of God's creations. An 11-year-old boy said he was drawn to hawks by their eyes, unpredictable and impossible to know. His little sister focused on the birds' beauty. Others among the three dozen people sprawled on boulders Monday afternoon were mesmerized by the raptors' projection of power and sense of freedom, the knowledge that these creatures travel thousands of miles south every fall and have done so for thousands of years.
NEWS
May 13, 2003 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the end of the Hawk Mountain trail, where two hikers emerge to a breathtaking vista known as North Lookout, stands a short man with copper-colored skin, a clipboard at his side, and binoculars pointed skyward. In a thick, unfamiliar accent, he lists some of the raptor species he's spotted migrating along the ridge this day. He is friendly, telling the hikers he teaches at an impoverished school in Nepal. So what is he doing in Berks County? The story goes back 3 1/2 years, to another hillside, this one at the edge of the Himalayas.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1993 | By Lillian A. Swanson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A black fleck above the mountain ridge grew larger as it flew straight toward the murmuring crowd perched on the jagged rocks. "Bald eagle over five," said a voice matter-of-factly, and the conversation snapped off. The onlookers rose to their feet, and dozens of binoculars arched skyward, over the mountaintop's fifth knob. Closer and closer, silently and gracefully, glided the majestic bird. Within seconds, it filled the binoculars with its white head, dark eye and feathers the color of cocoa.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
It's fall and the big birds are moving. Not far from West Chester, Era VanDenburg counted 147 from outside her back door one day last week. These were not escapees from Buddy Ryan's band. These were the real birds of prey - the hawks, the falcons and, of course, the eagles that wing their way south through Chester County skies before the onset of winter. Soaring far overhead and gliding effortlessly on unseen thermal cushions, the migrating raptors provide for many folks fall's most thrilling spectator sport.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 15 years ago, Villanova University biology professor Robert Curry was looking for a project that would allow his students to investigate something interesting without much travel. He found it in a cheeky little bird with a black cap, familiar to anyone with a backyard feeder: the chickadee. His idea was to catch a lot of birds (with special nets), band them to identify individuals, and keep track of all they did - who was nesting with whom and where, how many offspring they had, where the young went when they set out on their own. Little did Curry know how quickly this creature, weighing less than two quarters, would provide clear evidence of birds moving northward - at quite a clip - in association with climate change.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 15 years ago, Villanova University biology professor Robert Curry was looking for a project that would allow his students to investigate something interesting without much travel. He found it in a cheeky little bird with a black cap, familiar to anyone with a backyard feeder: the chickadee. His idea was to catch a lot of birds (with special nets), band them to identify individuals, and keep track of all they did - who was nesting with whom and where, how many offspring they had, where the young went when they set out on their own. Little did Curry know how quickly this creature, weighing less than two quarters, would provide clear evidence of birds moving northward - at quite a clip - in association with climate change.
NEWS
June 22, 2012 | By Ron Devlin, READING EAGLE
KEMPTON, Pa. - Exhausted but joyful, a bleary-eyed Elizabeth Christman stood in front of the Hawk Mountain Sanctuary visitor center in Berks County at 1 a.m. Thursday. "We're ecstatic," the 38-year-old Allentown occupational therapist said, speaking for her husband, Scott. "We feel joy and thankfulness. " Her father, Robert Durn, 74, of Allentown, and her two sons, Garrod, 9, and Griffen, 5, had been missing in a remote section of Hawk Mountain for more than eight hours before being found shortly before 12:01 a.m. Thursday.
NEWS
September 2, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not long after 6:30 a.m. Wednesday, when the air was still cool and the sun was just a glow on the horizon, Melissa Roach and Pete Dunne saw it through their binoculars, riding in low over the cedars: an American kestrel, also known as a sparrow hawk. They watched it for a while, then looked at each other and smiled. "Another year begins," Dunne said. It was the first day of the annual hawk watch at the best place in North America to see the fall migration: Cape May Point State Park.
NEWS
October 26, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a Sunday afternoon in 1932, Harold and Richard Pough and two friends went to a mountain in Berks County and changed the history of conservation. After the brothers saw hawk after hawk being shot while migrating, Harold returned to photograph the results of the slaughter and helped alert a benefactor. "His significance was that . . . his photographs ultimately led to the creation of the first refuge for birds of prey, in the world" - what is now Hawk Mountain Sanctuary - sanctuary spokeswoman Mary Linkevich said last week.
NEWS
October 12, 2009 | By William Ecenbarger FOR THE INQUIRER
Every autumn they came to Hawk Mountain, the men carrying shotguns, rifles, ammunition, and whiskey, the women toting picnic baskets and children. From a rocky vantage point, the sharpshooters took aim at the migrating birds that, by instinct, came flapping, soaring, and hovering along the narrow ridgetop. When the hunters fired, there was an enormous shudder of sound followed by the acrid tang of gun smoke. Then six seconds of eerie silence. Finally came the loud crackling as dozens of birds, some of them weighing as much as 14 pounds, crashed into the dry leaves on the valley floor below.
NEWS
October 2, 2004 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A priest, a minister and a rabbi were relaxing near the pinnacle when someone said to look up. They saw a bird - a magnificent hawk, spiraling higher and higher toward darkening clouds, an example of the glory of God's creations. An 11-year-old boy said he was drawn to hawks by their eyes, unpredictable and impossible to know. His little sister focused on the birds' beauty. Others among the three dozen people sprawled on boulders Monday afternoon were mesmerized by the raptors' projection of power and sense of freedom, the knowledge that these creatures travel thousands of miles south every fall and have done so for thousands of years.
NEWS
May 13, 2003 | By Don Sapatkin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the end of the Hawk Mountain trail, where two hikers emerge to a breathtaking vista known as North Lookout, stands a short man with copper-colored skin, a clipboard at his side, and binoculars pointed skyward. In a thick, unfamiliar accent, he lists some of the raptor species he's spotted migrating along the ridge this day. He is friendly, telling the hikers he teaches at an impoverished school in Nepal. So what is he doing in Berks County? The story goes back 3 1/2 years, to another hillside, this one at the edge of the Himalayas.
NEWS
August 19, 1997 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lewis Lehrer, 81, an anesthesiologist who worked in the Philadelphia area for a half century, died Friday at his home in Voorhees. Born in Altoona, Pa., Dr. Lehrer resided in Wyndmoor, Pa., before moving to Cherry Hill in 1967. He had lived in Voorhees since 1996. Dr. Lehrer was the chief anesthesiologist at Underwood-Memorial Hospital, Woodbury, between 1967 and 1980. During his career, he also worked at Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia General Hospital, Deborah Hospital, Kensington Hospital and Lower Bucks Hospital.
NEWS
March 9, 1997 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Getting a bit spooked by the shadows of wide-winged birds circling high overhead? You're not imagining things. The warm winter and a bounty of backyard bird feeders have caused more hawks to be seen this year in Southeastern Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey, naturalists say. It's part of a longer-term trend. The National Audubon Society says that, from 1980 through 1995, sightings of some hawks in this region have increased significantly. Although bad for rodents and small birds, it is terrific news for the rest of us. "Predators are often the best biological indicators of a healthy environment," said Keith Bildstein, research director at Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, near Kempton, in northern Berks County.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1993 | By Lillian A. Swanson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A black fleck above the mountain ridge grew larger as it flew straight toward the murmuring crowd perched on the jagged rocks. "Bald eagle over five," said a voice matter-of-factly, and the conversation snapped off. The onlookers rose to their feet, and dozens of binoculars arched skyward, over the mountaintop's fifth knob. Closer and closer, silently and gracefully, glided the majestic bird. Within seconds, it filled the binoculars with its white head, dark eye and feathers the color of cocoa.
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