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Hay Fever

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NEWS
May 14, 1997 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul DiLorenzo has lived with it for 26 years, and this, he says, is as bad as it gets. "It's one of the worst years I remember," said DiLorenzo, 61, retired Philadelphia police officer and active hay-fever sufferer. He is familiar with the drill - sneezing, sore throat, sneezing, itching eyes, sneezing, congestion, more sneezing - but this year he has added something new. "The sneezing's actually made my chest sore," he said. Since Monday, experts say, the air has been stuffed with tree and grass pollen and mold spores, in part due to nature's great annual love frenzy.
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
It's time for the sneezes and tears that bloom in the spring. Hay fever. But what's perplexing, says Dr. Nyok-Kheng Lim, an internist, is that so many people arriving at her office with hay fever say, "No, it can't be. I don't have allergies. " "This is the time of year that it always starts. We see people coming in with allergies to pollens, grass and various other things that are in season," said Lim, a clinical assistant professor of medicine at Medical College of Pennsylvania whose practice is based in the Northeast at MCP's Harbison satellite facility.
NEWS
August 24, 1989 | By Christine Donato, Special to The Inquirer
This summer's near-record rainfall may serve as an alert for hay fever victims, some allergy experts say. Paul Reber, retired horticulture agent at the Penn State Cooperative Extension Service in Montgomery County, said the plants that affected hay fever would certainly be much healthier this year, considering the abundance of rain. "We've had perfect growing conditions this summer, which are sure to multiply the number of pollen-producing flowers," he said. Agronomy Extension agent Timothy Fritz said, however, that more rain this summer might actually help those with allergies.
NEWS
June 1, 1994
It starts in April with the tree pollens - the elm, poplar, willow, maple and ash. Others soon join the botanic orgy - the birch and mulberry. And then the hickory, oak and sycamore . . . and more. Eventually, it's the mold spores. And finally, diabolically, the grasses kick in, and the weeds. This is how the wonder of spring fever becomes the horror of hay fever. This is how a young man's fancy - or, say, the fancy of some 40 million Americans - turns to a misery so mundane that no one has thought to blunt it with a support group, or a line of sympathy cards or a telethon.
NEWS
April 20, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Noel Coward's play Hay Fever, it's all in the delivery. It has to be, because the 1925 play, which seized 'em with laughter in London, has never been that funny over here, where it's been on Broadway four times - fast wearing out its welcome in each staging. Being welcome is what Hay Fever's all about, in a simple plot you could call a precursor to TV situation comedy. Each of four family members has invited a guest to a classy summer home (a walloping set by David Russell, complete with rain)
NEWS
February 7, 1995 | By John Updike
We have one home, the first, and leave that one. The having and leaving go on together . . . I wrote these lines nearly 40 years ago, in a poem for the bicentennial of the founding of my home town of Shillington, Pa., near Reading. I was already, in 1958, a resident of Massachusetts, north of Boston, and there I still reside. I had come to New England as a college student, and after a few years in old England and New York City, I returned, with my young family, as an experiment.
NEWS
March 2, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
MOTHER OF ALL PHRASES Read my lips - Saddam Hussein has given us the first great catch phrase of the '90s. Barely a month after he promised "the mother of all battles," variations of that hyperbolic description are being heard everywhere. Hussein might seem like an unlikely creator of a catch phrase, but then, so was Clara Peller, the little old lady who bellowed "Where's the beef?" in a 1984 Wendy's commercial. Hussein's nemesis, President Bush, had his innings with "Read my lips," and Ronald Reagan got mileage out of Clint Eastwood's "Make my day. " HEALTHY DEVELOPMENT Is there a would-be doctor in the house?
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | By Deborah Lawson, Special to The Inquirer
Pet allergies, which can be triggered by plants, gardening products, flea and tick sprays or collars, are common in summer. They cause skin and coat problems, respiratory difficulties, and more serious reactions. Pets can suffer from the common allergy of hay fever, although the symptoms are not the coughing and sneezing that a human shows. For a dog or cat, hay fever usually involves continual scratching and digging at the skin - the same way that animals react to a flea-bite allergy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2014 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's getting hard out here for a comedian. Just ask Tracy Morgan. "People are ultrasensitive now," he says on the phone from Vegas, where he's making a stop on his Turn It Funny stand-up tour. "It seems like you can't say anything about anyone. "Everyone has an opinion. People comment. That's social media," he says, hacking repeatedly. He took his hay fever with him on the plane from Jersey. Morgan is more vulnerable to getting caught on tape than most. It's not that the Saturday Night Live and 30 Rock veteran doesn't have a filter.
NEWS
June 6, 2013
DURING my morning commute on SEPTA, I overheard several people discussing how their allergies have never been worse than they are this week. I can personally attest to that, as my own allergies flare daily. While this may seem like a normal spike in pollen we see this time of year, several studies have found that global warming is responsible for the increases in pollen and air pollution that are causing us all to suffer. The warmer temperatures and higher CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere allow plants to pollinate sooner and to pollinate for longer periods of time.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Parents are reporting more skin and food allergies in their children, a government survey found. Experts are not sure what is behind the increase. Could it be that children are growing up in households so clean that it leaves them more sensitive to things that can trigger allergies? Or are mom and dad paying closer attention? "We don't really have the answer," said Lara Akinbami of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the senior author of the report released Thursday.
NEWS
June 20, 2011 | Associated Press
CHICAGO - Food allergies affect about one in 13 U.S. children, double the latest government estimate, a new study suggests. The researchers say about 40 percent of them have severe reactions - a finding they hope will erase misconceptions that food allergies are just like hay fever and other seasonal allergies that are troublesome but not dangerous. Overall, 8 percent of the children studied had food allergies; peanuts and milk were the most common sources. That translates to nearly 6 million U.S. children.
NEWS
April 20, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Noel Coward's play Hay Fever, it's all in the delivery. It has to be, because the 1925 play, which seized 'em with laughter in London, has never been that funny over here, where it's been on Broadway four times - fast wearing out its welcome in each staging. Being welcome is what Hay Fever's all about, in a simple plot you could call a precursor to TV situation comedy. Each of four family members has invited a guest to a classy summer home (a walloping set by David Russell, complete with rain)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2003 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To the relief of fans around the world, the Blogger of Baghdad resurfaced this week. Many had feared for the safety of the popular Web diarist Salam Pax after his blog, or Web log, went dark March 24 - just as his colorful and verbose accounts of life on the edge of war were gaining him notice. As it happens, Pax is not only well but as breezy, acerbic and irreverent as ever, whether reporting on the "surreal" sight of "three tanks parked in front of an ice cream shop" or his hay fever - "The sexual life of palm trees makes me weep.
SPORTS
July 17, 1999 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rodney Pampling's dream of winning a British Open ended in gruesome style. The first-round leader shot an 86 yesterday and missed the cut. "I'm not happy, but it was a great experience for me," said Pampling, 30, an Australian. "I learned a lot - not to hit the ball in the rough. It's pretty basic, isn't it? But it's a big lesson to learn. I led the tournament. I've always got that to look back on. " Gesundheit. Jesper Parnevik very nearly walked off the course and pulled out of the tournament yesterday.
LIVING
November 9, 1998 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Over-the-counter allergy medicines may be cheap and convenient for hay-fever sufferers, but they have a downside, too. New guidelines released today by a task force of the nation's leading allergy specialists say the new generation of prescription antihistamine drugs has fewer side effects than many older but commonly used medicines such as Actifed, Benadryl, Tavist, Chlor-Trimeton, Dimetapp and Drixoral. The guidelines point to studies showing that the older drugs can impair driving and job performance, and diminish school results for children.
NEWS
May 14, 1997 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Paul DiLorenzo has lived with it for 26 years, and this, he says, is as bad as it gets. "It's one of the worst years I remember," said DiLorenzo, 61, retired Philadelphia police officer and active hay-fever sufferer. He is familiar with the drill - sneezing, sore throat, sneezing, itching eyes, sneezing, congestion, more sneezing - but this year he has added something new. "The sneezing's actually made my chest sore," he said. Since Monday, experts say, the air has been stuffed with tree and grass pollen and mold spores, in part due to nature's great annual love frenzy.
NEWS
February 7, 1995 | By John Updike
We have one home, the first, and leave that one. The having and leaving go on together . . . I wrote these lines nearly 40 years ago, in a poem for the bicentennial of the founding of my home town of Shillington, Pa., near Reading. I was already, in 1958, a resident of Massachusetts, north of Boston, and there I still reside. I had come to New England as a college student, and after a few years in old England and New York City, I returned, with my young family, as an experiment.
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