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Hazardous Materials

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NEWS
September 23, 1996 | By Mary Beth Warner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a flurry of activity, the firefighters hosed down the cement, covering the parking lot of the Cherry Hill Industrial Park with a thick layer of white foam. The action was taken by the members of the Cherry Hill Fire Department's hazardous-materials unit to squelch the vapors spewing from the 2,600 gallons of liquid that had oozed from a gasoline tanker. Only this time, the liquid they were carefully covering was water, not flammable gasoline. And the mood was decidedly calm yesterday as 50 to 60 emergency workers practiced containing a spill from an 8,000-gallon gasoline tanker in a four-hour drill.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
The Arco Chemical Co. of Newtown Square will sponsor its second household hazardous waste collection day on Saturday. The event, which is open to Newtown Township residents and Arco employees, will be held rain or shine in a tented area on Arco grounds, 3801 West Chester Pike. Signs will lead motorists to the West Chester Pike entrance, which will be open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Facilities manager Gary Wolf said the day was consistent with a responsible follow-up to the message of Earth Day. "Our intent is to make a commitment to our community and to Arco employees," Wolf said.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
West Chester industrial companies that use hazardous and toxic materials are making a joint effort to share information and coordinate emergency response programs. On Sept. 14, officials from Chubb National Foam, Fermtec Inc., Sartomer Co. and Wyeth-Ayerst Labs Inc. met with officials from Chester County Emergency Services, the West Chester Fire Department, Fame Fire Company and East Goshen Township to view aerial slides of their plants and discuss potential hazards and emergency procedures.
NEWS
June 14, 1992 | By James Cordrey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Prospect Park Borough Council has approved two ordinances regulating the transportation and storage of hazardous materials. The ordinances, approved Tuesday, are mandatory for compliance with state and federal regulations that protect the environment, Solicitor John Toal said. The ordinances cover explosives, flammable liquids, flammable solids, poisons and radioactive materials. They do not ban the materials from the borough but regulate the transportation and storage of them above a certain quantity.
NEWS
December 25, 1987 | By Lacy McCrary, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the night of Oct. 23, Bob Hedden, chief of the Falls Township Volunteer Fire Company Number One, faced a critical - and typical - decision. A leak at a local chemical plant was creating a vapor cloud, and Hedden had no idea what it was. No one from the company, Solkatronic Chemical Inc., was immediately available to tell him. So, as Hedden ordered an evacuation of about 150 residents living near the plant, three specially equipped firefighters...
NEWS
November 23, 1986 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
The Interboro School District will join a consortium of other county school systems in seeking to comply with new state legislation on hazardous materials. Schools Superintendent Edmond O. Sacchetti said the Pennsylvania State Worker and Community Right To Know Law goes into effect Dec. 1. The law requires the identification and labeling of all toxic substances and hazardous materials on school or work premises, and the training of employees in their proper handling, he said. The Interboro School Board voted 8-0 to join the consortium after Sacchetti told members that complying with the law would be less expensive if the district were part of a group.
NEWS
January 23, 1995 | By Jennifer Wing, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Township Commissioner Alan Kessler has made his professional life slightly more hazardous. Kessler was selected last week as vice chairman of President Clinton's Commission on Risk Assessment and Risk Management, which has been charged with studying hazardous materials and how they should be regulated. "It really is a hot issue," said Kessler, a Wynnewood resident. "It's an issue that was in the Republicans' Contract With America and will consume a large amount of time in Congress.
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Strawberry Mansion residents watched in astonishment yesterday as a swarm of hazardous materials experts began exploring a nearby building loaded with toxic chemicals. "I just came to the door and I seen all the police and all the Fire Department out there," said William Arnold, who lives near the building, on Dauphin Street near 29th, where investigators found more than 300 drums. "They're getting ready to take it out, I guess. " Labels on some of the drums indicated they contained extremely hazardous chemicals, including ammonia and hydrofluoric acid, the Environmental Protection Agency said.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
In response to student interests and expanding career fields, Burlington County College will offer several new academic programs and courses. In the fall, the college will launch certification programs in basic automotive technology and hazardous materials and will offer an associate of applied science degree in quality assurance technology. Offered in cooperation with Burlington County Vocational-Technical Schools, the 30-credit automotive program will cover basic automotive repair as well as business mathematics and related topics.
NEWS
June 24, 2005 | By Shannon McCaffrey INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A federal crackdown on fraud at state motor-vehicle departments across the country has nabbed more than a dozen illegal immigrants licensed to transport hazardous materials. While none of those apprehended has any known links to terrorism, federal agents said yesterday that the recent busts have revealed a significant threat to homeland security. In one case, a Pakistani man ordered to leave the United States nine years ago was driving a tanker truck filled with gasoline for Exxon.
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NEWS
May 27, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
EVER SINCE he drove a school bus in his native North Carolina, Joe Davis just loved getting behind the wheel of a big vehicle. When he came to Philadelphia, he switched from buses to trucks, and eventually started his own trucking company, hauling just about anything that could be hauled, including hazardous materials. Joe also could be called on to help out wherever needed, including his church and his community. You never heard Joe Davis turn down a request to be of service to others.
NEWS
January 9, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
PAULSBORO State and local officials monitoring a malfunction at a petroleum refinery near Paulsboro said no hazardous materials were released with the columns of smoke that rose Tuesday. But authorities said the cold weather could cause a problem. Paulsboro Fire Chief Alfonso G. Giampola said a power outage at the refinery shut down the steam at an ExxonMobil lubrication plant in Paulsboro. "We're concerned about the sprinkler system freezing," Giampola said. Schools were briefly ordered to shelter in place Tuesday afternoon, Giampola said.
NEWS
December 16, 2012
Peter Mandel is an author of books for children, including the new "Jackhammer Sam" (Macmillan/Roaring Brook) The Internet is a nearly infinite universe of things I do not want to know. I can usually ignore the boasts, the shards of opinion, and the superfluous stuff. But one fact sticks in my craw: There are people who brazenly use my name. I'm not alone in this. The journalist David F. Carr shares most of his name with the well-known New York Times columnist David M. Carr. It didn't seem so bad, F. Carr recently said, except that M. Carr chronicled his years of drug abuse in his memoir.
NEWS
October 16, 2012 | Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - A teacher arrested Friday at Los Angeles International Airport wearing a bulletproof vest and with checked bags containing knives, body bags, a smoke grenade and other weapons also had files on his computer detailing how to kidnap and kill people, according to federal authorities. In addition, Yongda Huang Harris had items on his computer revealing he has a "strong interest" in sexual violence against girls, including a video titled "Schoolgirls in Cement," Assistant U.S. Attorney Melissa Mills said.
NEWS
August 31, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly a decade after a Camden medical-transportation service closed for good, the shelves of its Haddon Avenue headquarters remain lined with tools, and documents spill from boxes onto the first floor. "It's like they got up from work at 5 and went home and just never came back," Robert Van Fossen, the state Department of Environmental Protection's director of emergency management, said Wednesday as he walked through the abandoned two-story Ambivan Medical Transport building. Vandals have stripped the building of copper and other metals and probably have taken other valuables, city officials said Wednesday.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Frank Kummer, STAFF WRITER
Lightning struck two chemical storage tanks at Dow Chemical's Rohm & Haas Bristol plant Wednesday morning, touching off a three-alarm blaze that sent a large orange ball of flame and thick black plume of smoke into the predawn sky and blanketed the area with fumes for hours afterward. A Bristol Fire Police officer, identified as David Wintz, 65, who was helping direct traffic and went home after complaining about not feeling well, suffered a heart attack and later died at Aria Health-Torresdale Campus, officials said.
NEWS
August 4, 2011 | Staff Report
The worst of this morning's troubled commute on the Pennsylvania Turnpike near Valley Forge might be over, but problems on Route 202 and the Schuylkill remain. Thousands of motorists first ran into trouble early this morning when the westbound lanes of the turnpike near Route 422 were closed from a tractor trailer accident. But all lanes were finally opened at 8:45 a.m. after the remains from the resulting hazardous materials were cleaned. Before that, it had been a painfully slow crawl for miles.
NEWS
October 7, 2010 | By Linda Loyd and Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Passengers aboard a US Airways flight bound for Bermuda were delayed for more than 6 hours at Philadelphia International Airport "due to a security concern," said a spokesman for US Airways. According to the FBI, a crew of three baggage handlers was dispatched to load luggage onto Flight 1070. When they arrived at the aircraft, they found a fourth man already there in uniform. They did not recognize him. When they asked the fourth man why he was there, he clambered onto a baggage cart and drove it away.
NEWS
March 9, 2010 | By James Osborne INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 115-car cargo train derailed in Center City last night, with five cars leaving the tracks near 23d and Race Streets. Battalion Fire Chief Mike Kane said there were no injuries and there was no evidence of leakage from any of the five cars. The derailed cars did not tip over. Nearby apartment buildings were not evacuated. The derailment occurred about 10 p.m. Fire and hazardous-materials crews were on the scene and waited for a representative from CSX, the operator of the freight train, but departed by 11:30 p.m. Train traffic on the line was shut down.
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