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Hazardous Waste

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NEWS
March 8, 1989 | By Scott Brodeur, Special to The Inquirer
High levels of hazardous-waste materials exist in a small area of an abandoned waste facility in a remote section of Winslow Township, a representative from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency told 11 Winslow residents and officials last night. An EPA investigation of the site, which was a waste-processing facility in the early 1970s, found higher than normal levels of heavy metals, such as copper, nickel and lead, and volatile organic compounds, such as benzene and arsenic, in the soil, said Marilyn Haye, the enforcement project manager for the EPA. Because there are no drinking water wells or residences near the 10-acre site on Piney Hollow Road, immediate danger is not evident, Haye said at the township environmental commission meeting.
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Give of your oven cleaner, your flea powder, your tired paint thinner yearning to breath free. That's what a consortium of local officials would like you to do. The county is sponsoring a free pickup program for household hazardous waste that typically ends up in the trash but should be disposed of in a better way. County residents can take cans of old pesticide; polish; mothballs, and oven, window and bowl cleaner to the Oxford Valley Mall...
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | By Reed Karaim, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
An angry grandmother, Wanda Endel, points out the houses of cancer victims in her neighborhood while the plume of smoke from one of the nation's largest hazardous waste incinerators drifts overhead. A farmer, James Norman, kneels in a stream that had been a swimming hole for generations, now filled with runoff from timber clear-cutting in the Ouachita National Forest. A retired woman, Iva McKinney, remembers feeling sick for weeks before she learned her well had been contaminated by fecal bacteria from a poultry- processing waste pond.
NEWS
December 14, 1988 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
An attorney for Waste Conversion Inc., the Hatfield, Pa., hazardous-waste hauler that was fined $3 million last week for improperly disposing of hazardous incinerator ash, has denounced the fine as "pure sensationalism" and said it would appeal the penalty. The company, which was also ordered to surrender its New Jersey hauling license, blamed its predicament on another company that was fined, Rollins Environmental Services Inc., which operates a hazardous-waste incinerator in Logan Township, N.J. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection last week announced it had imposed the largest administrative fines in its history against Waste Conversion and Rollins for the ash dumping.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
Envirosafe Services of Pennsylvania Inc., yesterday won the first of two approvals needed from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources (DER) for a new hazardous-waste treatment plant and landfill in Narvon, Lancaster County. Red Rose Alliance, an environmental group that has been fighting Envirosafe's efforts for 10 years, immediately announced that it would appeal DER's decision to the state Environmental Hearing Board. Caernarvon Township supervisors also plan an appeal, according to Supervisors Chairman Jerald L. Martin.
NEWS
July 26, 1987 | By Andy Hilliard, Special to The Inquirer
In addition to providing products or services, many small businesses ranging from print shops and dry cleaners to garages and laboratories also produce a byproduct - hazardous waste, in the form of acids, solvents, sludge and other chemicals. Until last year, businesses that generated modest amounts of hazardous waste could dump their dangerous chemicals down the drain and toss toxic waste into the trash. Now, such waste must be disposed of under stringent regulations. In March 1986, the federal Resource and Recovery Act was amended to cover operations in which as little as 220 pounds of hazardous waste a month is generated.
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Strange bedfellows indeed. There was former New Jersey Gov. Jim Florio, a staunch proponent of strict environmental regulation, lobbying for the hazardous-waste incinerator industry. And the industry, oddly enough, found itself allied with environmental activists and angry PTA mothers. They all descended on the Capitol yesterday to call for tougher regulations for the cement industry. At issue: the increasing use of hazardous waste as an added fuel to heat kilns in the cement-making process.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | By Michele McCreary, Special to The Inquirer
The Falls Township Zoning Hearing Board has delayed until next month a decision on an appeal to allow a chemical-waste company to open in the township. Residents of the Pennswood Crossing Mobile Home Park persuaded the zoning board members to wait until their next meeting, Nov. 7, before rendering a decision. The proposed company would be adjacent to the mobile home park. The board voted 4-0 to delay the decision until the next meeting. On Feb. 4, the owners of Ronald Hensor Trucking Terminal in Fairless Hills, Ronald and Ellen Hensor, entered into an agreement of sale with Eastern Chemical Waste Systems of Morrisville.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | By Forrest L. Black, Special to The Inquirer
Delaware County Democrats and environmentalists clashed with county officials over operation of the new $320 million Westinghouse trash-to-steam plant in Chester City at a raucous session of County Council this week. The two groups criticized the county at Tuesday's council session for not coming up with a plan to dispose of household hazardous waste, and one Democrat, Larry Arata, contended that the plant was operating in violation of state law. Among other things, the Democrats and environmentalists have accused the council of allowing hazardous waste to be incinerated at the plant, polluting the environment.
NEWS
July 9, 1986 | By Virginia M. Resnik, Special to The Inquirer
If a hazardous-waste storage facility is installed on a Cumberland County site, the waste probably will be trucked through Gloucester and Camden County towns, Cumberland County officials and politicians have said. Residents and politicians opposing the facility's siting in a woodland along the Maurice River in Maurice River Township have warned that if the facility was put in their county, residents of towns along the major highways that criss-cross Gloucester and Camden Counties could expect the waste to be transported through on trucks.
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NEWS
February 29, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
Two years ago, about 10,000 gallons of chemicals spilled into the Elk River just upstream from Charleston, W.Va., where Lisa Tordo's relatives live. For a month, Tordo said, the family couldn't drink water from its faucets. That's one reason she worries about Elcon. The Israel-based company wants to build a hazardous-waste treatment facility - and eventually its U.S. headquarters - not far from Tordo's home in Lower Bucks County. The proposed plant in Falls Township would treat about 150,000 tons of hazardous wastewater a year.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Comcast Corp. has agreed to pay nearly $26 million to settle a California investigation into improper disposal of hazardous waste and failure to shred discarded customer records. California Attorney General Kamala D. Harris said the Philadelphia-based cable giant's "careless and unlawful hazardous waste disposal practices jeopardized the health and environmental well-being of California communities and exposed their customers to the threat of identity theft. " The majority of the hazardous waste was electronic equipment: remote controls, splitters, routers, modems, amplifiers, and power adapters.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Department of Environmental Protection on Wednesday rejected a controversial application for a Bucks County hazardous waste treatment facility because the business failed to demonstrate compliance with flood-hazard regulations. DEP said it denied Elcon Recycling Services' siting application for a proposed liquid hazardous waste treatment facility in the Keystone Industrial Port Complex in Falls Township, the former United States Steel Fairless Works site. The agency said that Elcon had not complied with its request to provide a hydrologic analysis, including any historical data, to demonstrate that the proposed site has not been flooded in the past.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Action Manufacturing Co., a military contractor, has agreed to pay a $1.2 million fine for hazardous-waste violations and to remove its top executive to settle criminal charges brought by the U.S. attorney in Philadelphia, according to court documents. The prosecutor's plea memorandum on Wednesday described Action, with operations in Bucks and Chester Counties, as tightly controlled by Arthur J. Mattia, its chairman and president. The plea agreement banned Mattia from the board of directors and management of the company.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2013
Phillips 66 Co. has agreed to pay a $50,000 penalty to settle alleged violations of hazardous waste regulations at its former refinery in Trainer, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Tuesday. EPA cited Phillips 66 for violations involving the storage of hazardous materials including refinery hydrocarbon waste, chromium waste, heavy metal waste from batteries and mercury waste from fluorescent bulbs. Phillips 66 Co. is the successor to ConocoPhillips Corp., which owned the refinery until it was sold last year to Monroe Energy, a subsidiary of Delta Air Lines.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is contaminated with PCBs, and it might pose a danger to the endangered shortnose sturgeon in the Delaware River. So on Tuesday the Environmental Protection Agency added a Trainer, Delaware County, industrial-waste site near the Delaware River to its Superfund national-priority list, making it eligible for a federal cleanup. EPA said that the main source of contamination at the facility once operated by the bankrupt Metro Container Corp. is a half-acre toxic disposal lagoon.
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
With more Superfund sites than any state in the country and more than 16,000 hazardous-waste cleanups pending, New Jersey's industrial landscape has long made it a punch line of pollution jokes. But now that state environmental officials are trying to trim the backlog by handing control to the private sector, they are facing a backlash from both the state's environmentalists and its industrial and chemical companies. Under plans still being reviewed, state-licensed environmental professionals will be granted day-to-day autonomy, relegating state bureaucrats to the role of auditors on the majority of cases.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Americans bought 2.9 billion toys last year. As I stumble through the house after play dates, it sometimes feels as if my 8-year-old son owns all of them. Our living room is exploding with Lego bricks, Nerf weaponry, and rubbery bounce balls. My son's bedroom is, more often than not, carpeted with Pokemon cards and comic books, Matchbox cars and MythBusters science experiments. It's a problem that's a lot like bedbugs. I have no idea where a lot of these toys even came from, and getting rid of them responsibly is a lot more difficult than I'd imagined.
NEWS
April 8, 2011 | By PHILLIP LUCAS, lucasp@phillynews.com
The Streets Department wants your hazardous waste - and they want it now. The department's Sanitation Division is inviting Philadelphians to dispose of, or recycle, unwanted pesticides, oil-based paints, solvents and flammable liquids, among other things, at a citywide household hazardous waste collection event Saturday. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., the Streets Department training center at State Road and Ashburner Road, in Upper Holmesburg, will accept trash that may be harmful to the environment if disposed with regular household garbage, or poured down storm drains.
NEWS
September 19, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 3,500-acre hazardous-waste site at McGuire Air Force Base in Burlington County will be cleaned up under an agreement signed this week between the Air Force and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the EPA said yesterday. The agreement calls for the removal of nickel, mercury, PCBs, and other contaminants at the McGuire Air Force Base Superfund Site in New Hanover Township, the agency said. It "is a significant milestone that will benefit the people of New Jersey and the environment," said George Pavlou, acting EPA regional administrator.
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