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NEWS
May 16, 2006 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A hazardous-material scare caused by a Yeadon man's fatal ingestion of an unknown toxic substance forced the closing of Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital's emergency room Sunday night so the room and at least 14 police, fire, ambulance and hospital personnel could be decontaminated. They had come in contact with the vomited-up substance or breathed its fumes. None suffered adverse health effects, authorities said yesterday. After being closed for about six hours while a hazmat crew cleaned the examination area where the man had been pronounced dead, the Darby hospital's emergency room reopened early yesterday.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
A white powder discovered at the Federal Courthouse in Center City turned out to be a false alarm this morning. Shortly after 9:30 a.m., a hazmat team responded to a report of the discovery of a white powder on the building's second floor, according to police and fire officials. A prisoner in the building allegedly sent a letter to an office on the second floor and claimed the envelope contained anthrax, leading to the evacuation of the floor, according to Executive Fire Chief Richard Davison.
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The day after an incident at a Villanova University chemistry lab sent 29 people to the hospital and led to the evacuation of a building, investigators were still unsure Wednesday why the students fell ill. About 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, students in a freshman chemistry class at the Mendel Science Center were conducting a routine experiment when a student fell ill, university officials said in a statement. Initially, classmates thought she was having an asthma attack. The student left the lab, and a faculty member went to help her but began feeling faint herself, officials said.
NEWS
May 21, 2010 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
News reports on Fox29 and 6ABC last night had suggested that a Food Network show might have been responsible for the flour-filled balloon that created a hazmat scare at the Liberty Bell yesterday. But that's not the case, and the Food Network and the FBI are denying the connection. " Chef vs. City , a Food Network program, was shooting at Independence Hall, adjacent to the location where the incident occurred," Food Network said in a statement. "However, no balloons were used in association with the production shoot, and no cooking ingredients or items that could be misconstrued to be a white powdery substance were part of the taping that occurred at this location.
NEWS
October 13, 2001 | By Ralph Vigoda and Jere Downs INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
John Kirk stepped out of his 18-wheeler yesterday, holding a thick, rounded baton of hickory. About a foot-and-a-half long, the "tire billy" is used by truckers to thump tires to see whether they need air. Since last month, though, Kirk sees that it could have another use: self-defense. As he hauls gasoline around the Philadelphia suburbs in a big Sunoco tanker truck, he heeds FBI and police warnings to be particularly vigilant. "Keep your doors locked, your eyes open, watch out what's going on around you, be aware," Kirk said after parking at the Pennsylvania Turnpike's King of Prussia rest stop.
NEWS
September 5, 2003 | By Adam Fifield INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police, emergency services, and hazardous-material response units in South Jersey are getting millions in federal funding to prepare for the threat of chemical, nuclear, biological and other catastrophes. More than $25 million in grants from the Department of Homeland Security is being funneled by the state to counties, with a priority placed on "high risk areas," state Attorney General Peter Harvey announced on Wednesday. Gloucester County - home to four of seven industrial facilities in the Philadelphia region that have high levels of hazardous chemicals - is getting $918,970 over a two-year period.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A passenger on a US Airways flight Wednesday from Philadelphia to the Dominican Republic was greeted by agents in hazmat suits after he allegedly made a joke about Ebola. A video uploaded on YouTube by a passenger shows at least four people in blue hazmat suits boarding the flight, which had landed in Punta Cana, and eventually escorting the unidentified man off the plane. The airline issued the following statement: "US Airways Flight 845 from Philadelphia to Punta Cana was met yesterday by local officials upon landing due to a possible health issue on board.
NEWS
February 2, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
The FBI is on the scene of several North Jersey hotels in the vicinity of the Meadowlands site of Sunday's Super Bowl that received letters containing a suspicious substance, Bergen County officials said. County hazmat teams, the joint terrorism task force, and hazmat materials units all deployed to investigate, the FBI said in a news release. The New Jersey State Police issued a statement saying there are no reported injuries and the locations are being secured. The locations are the Econo Lodge on Washington Avenue in Carlstadt, the Renaissance Meadowlands Hotel on Rutherford Avenue in Rutherford, the Homewood Suites on Route 17 in East Rutherford, and the Hilton Hasbrouck Heights Meadowlands on Terrace Avenue in Hasbrouk Heights.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, zalotm@phillynews.com 215-854-5928
A SUSPICIOUS white, powdery substance delivered in the mail yesterday to the office of U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., in a Center City skyscraper - sparking a homeland security and hazmat scare - turned out to be cornstarch, police said. An intern opened a letter containing the powder in Toomey's office, on the 17th floor of 8 Penn Center, said Officer Tanya Little, a police spokeswoman. Department of Homeland Security, fire and hazmat officials were on the scene at 17th Street and JFK Boulevard to investigate about 3 p.m. About an hour later, they determined that the substance was harmless, Little said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2010 | ByJEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
At first glance, "Avengers Academy" seemed to be yet another attempt by Marvel to take advantage of the popularity of their (arguably) No. 1 franchise by slapping its name on a book featuring new teen heroes. The premise was pretty straightforward. Take the best and brightest of the young superhumans who had been recruited, trained, exploited and abused by the evil Norman Osborn and, under the guidance of other heroes like Hank Pym and Quicksilver - who know about giving in to their dark side, living with evil and second chances - have them find purpose, meaning and stability by being trained in the noble tradition of Earth's Mightiest Heroes.
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NEWS
April 29, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JAMES McGARRIGLE never claimed to be God, but for the desperate firefighters trapped in a burning high-rise, their air packs running out, the man who led them to safety certainly was a figure of salvation. "When they saw his flashlight, they thought he was God," Jim's family said. Jim had landed by helicopter on the roof of One Meridian Plaza, the 30-story high-rise in Center City, that cold February day in 1991, scene of one of the deadliest fires in city history. A team of three firefighters reported they had become disoriented in the smoke and were running out of air. They died in the suffocating smoke.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
A passenger on a US Airways flight Wednesday from Philadelphia to the Dominican Republic was greeted by agents in hazmat suits after he allegedly made a joke about Ebola. A video uploaded on YouTube by a passenger shows at least four people in blue hazmat suits boarding the flight, which had landed in Punta Cana, and eventually escorting the unidentified man off the plane. The airline issued the following statement: "US Airways Flight 845 from Philadelphia to Punta Cana was met yesterday by local officials upon landing due to a possible health issue on board.
NEWS
February 2, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
The FBI is on the scene of several North Jersey hotels in the vicinity of the Meadowlands site of Sunday's Super Bowl that received letters containing a suspicious substance, Bergen County officials said. County hazmat teams, the joint terrorism task force, and hazmat materials units all deployed to investigate, the FBI said in a news release. The New Jersey State Police issued a statement saying there are no reported injuries and the locations are being secured. The locations are the Econo Lodge on Washington Avenue in Carlstadt, the Renaissance Meadowlands Hotel on Rutherford Avenue in Rutherford, the Homewood Suites on Route 17 in East Rutherford, and the Hilton Hasbrouck Heights Meadowlands on Terrace Avenue in Hasbrouk Heights.
NEWS
July 31, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN MARK Henderson was a kid, he and his father would sit on their stoop in Southwest Philadelphia and listen to the Phillies on a transistor radio. They would imagine every play as it transpired, and Dad occasionally would loudly demand, "Who's on first?" to test his son's attention to the game. It was a great way to learn baseball, akin to being tossed into the water to learn to swim, although without the trauma. "He had to be one of the most committed fans, because he never gave up on them, whether winning or losing," his family said.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
A white powder discovered at the Federal Courthouse in Center City turned out to be a false alarm this morning. Shortly after 9:30 a.m., a hazmat team responded to a report of the discovery of a white powder on the building's second floor, according to police and fire officials. A prisoner in the building allegedly sent a letter to an office on the second floor and claimed the envelope contained anthrax, leading to the evacuation of the floor, according to Executive Fire Chief Richard Davison.
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The day after an incident at a Villanova University chemistry lab sent 29 people to the hospital and led to the evacuation of a building, investigators were still unsure Wednesday why the students fell ill. About 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, students in a freshman chemistry class at the Mendel Science Center were conducting a routine experiment when a student fell ill, university officials said in a statement. Initially, classmates thought she was having an asthma attack. The student left the lab, and a faculty member went to help her but began feeling faint herself, officials said.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | Breaking News Desk
A Fire Department Hazmat Unit has not been able to identify the source of fumes that prompted officials to evacuate the James Sullivan Elementary School in Wissinoming this morning and declared the building safe after testing found nothing toxic in the air, the commander at the scene reported. No students or teachers required medical treatment because of the fumes, said Fire Department Executive Chief Richard Davison. The school at 5300 Ditmas Street was turned back to School District control for ventilation, the scene commander reported at 11:15 a.m. The K-5 school's 500 students and staff members were relocated by bus to the Warren G. Harding School a few blocks away.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, zalotm@phillynews.com 215-854-5928
A SUSPICIOUS white, powdery substance delivered in the mail yesterday to the office of U.S. Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., in a Center City skyscraper - sparking a homeland security and hazmat scare - turned out to be cornstarch, police said. An intern opened a letter containing the powder in Toomey's office, on the 17th floor of 8 Penn Center, said Officer Tanya Little, a police spokeswoman. Department of Homeland Security, fire and hazmat officials were on the scene at 17th Street and JFK Boulevard to investigate about 3 p.m. About an hour later, they determined that the substance was harmless, Little said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2010 | ByJEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
At first glance, "Avengers Academy" seemed to be yet another attempt by Marvel to take advantage of the popularity of their (arguably) No. 1 franchise by slapping its name on a book featuring new teen heroes. The premise was pretty straightforward. Take the best and brightest of the young superhumans who had been recruited, trained, exploited and abused by the evil Norman Osborn and, under the guidance of other heroes like Hank Pym and Quicksilver - who know about giving in to their dark side, living with evil and second chances - have them find purpose, meaning and stability by being trained in the noble tradition of Earth's Mightiest Heroes.
NEWS
May 22, 2010 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The discovery of powder in the wrong place prompted a second emergency response in two days Friday in Center City. The 18-story Municipal Services Building was evacuated after a powder spilled out of an envelope about 9 a.m., officials said. The evacuation was later limited to the concourse of the tower at 1401 John F. Kennedy Blvd., and the all-clear was sounded at 10:20 a.m. after it was determined the powder was harmless. Deputy Fire Commissioner Ernest Hargett said the beige substance spilled out of an envelope in a room where workers open water-bill payments.
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