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Head Count

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NEWS
August 26, 1998
A U.S. district court panel's rejection of using extensive statistical sampling for the 2000 census may be defensible as a matter of law, but the issue merits appeal to the Supreme Court. At the least, the judges' ruling appears to be overly broad in enjoining the Census Bureau from using the methods altogether. Both the law to which the court anchored its opinion and the refusal of the Republican majorities in Congress to change that law reflect mathematical illiteracy at best and political expediency at worst.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | By Howard Goodman, Inquirer Staff Writer
With a current head count of about 5,000 inmates, the population crisis that erupted in Philadelphia prisons in August has quietly ended. For the past several weeks, the inmate population has leveled off around 5,000 inmates, about 200 fewer than peak levels that saw scores of inmates sleeping on gymnasium floors, and prison officials worrying if they could supply enough mattresses and toothbrushes to keep up with the flood of newcomers....
NEWS
March 9, 2001
Secretary of Commerce Don Evans has announced that population totals obtained by the 2000 Census would not be statistically adjusted to account for those not counted or those counted twice. Evans had said last month that he alone would decide whether to allow statistical sampling techniques, clearly indicating that, like most Republicans, he opposes such techniques. The reason isn't obscure. When sampling techniques estimate the uncounted, those who are found tend to be in minorities and to vote Democratic.
NEWS
January 7, 2001 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A decade ago, census-takers counted 15,391 people in Philadelphia's Eastwick neighborhood and 11,768 in Montgomery County's Lower Moreland Township, disparate communities on opposite sides of the city. Neither number, however, was correct. The Census Bureau figured it missed about 200 people in Eastwick, a racially mixed section of working-class people in far South Philadelphia. And it probably double-counted about 200 people in Lower Moreland, a mostly white suburb of middle-class houses over the city's northeast border.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1990 | By Neill A. Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
There he is, counted like Philadelphia's 847,169 other residents in an ink scrawl on the 110-year-old yellowed paper: John Wanamaker, 45 years old. Profession: Clothing. The inventor of the department store lived on the south side of Walnut Street near 20th Street with his wife, two sons, two daughters and three domestics from Ireland, according to the bound results of the 1880 census. The Wanamaker family count and other census artifacts are on display at the National Archives regional office in Philadelphia as part of a commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the nation's first head count, taken in 1790.
NEWS
October 13, 2010
An inmate escaped from the Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility in the Northeast early Tuesday, prison officials said. Kevin Turner, 22, was present at a 3:45 a.m. head count but not at an 8:30 a.m. head count, said prison spokesman Robert Eskind. By 11 a.m., prison staff identified him as the missing person. Officials do not know how he escaped. Turner had been held at the prison since March on weapons charges and a burglary case. Officials initially believed Turner may have been hiding somewhere in the prison, but by the end of the day had determined that he appeared to have gotten out of the building.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | By Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer
An inmate who would have been eligible for parole in four days escaped early yesterday morning from his minimum-security cell at the Delaware Correctional Center near Smyrna. Leon Werkheiser Jr., 21, who was serving a seven-year sentence for assaulting a police officer and drug-related offenses, apparently escaped by pushing out the screen in the window of his cell, scaling a 16-foot fence and climbing over or through barbed wire atop the fence, said State Police spokesman Cpl. William Eubank.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeremy Levin did not give a pass to all 46,000 employees of Teva Pharmaceuticals Ltd., but some might be happy to hear that the chief executive officer said Tuesday that reducing "head count" will play only a "small role" in the company's plans to cut $1.5 billion to $2 billion in costs in the next five years. Teva is based in Israel but has its Americas headquarters in North Wales, as well as facilities in Horsham, Frazer, Sellersville, and several New Jersey locations. Indeed, part of Levin's concern since taking over as CEO on May 9 has been that the company has 74 locations in 120 countries and that its efforts were not properly focused.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | By Michelle R. Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Ted Ryan says he will not lose any sleep over the Census Bureau's decision not to adjust the 1990 census figures. He expected it. "I'm not surprised, bureaucracies being what they are," said Ryan, a Schuylkill Township supervisor. "I'm disappointed because we have solid evidence that we have more people living in the township than we are credited for. " The Census Bureau's decision will prevent Schuylkill Township from getting about $7,000 in state liquid-fuels tax money, Ryan said.
NEWS
October 14, 2009
If city officials believe Philadelphia's population is growing again after six decades of decline, they'd better do everything possible to make sure next year's U.S. census officially confirms the good news. That's going to require an aggressive public-awareness campaign - in effect, a sales job and charm offensive directed at all city residents, but particularly those who might not raise their hands so readily. The city's poorest residents, especially those in minority and immigrant communities, traditionally are most susceptible to being missed by the once-a-decade head count.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 10, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeremy Levin did not give a pass to all 46,000 employees of Teva Pharmaceuticals Ltd., but some might be happy to hear that the chief executive officer said Tuesday that reducing "head count" will play only a "small role" in the company's plans to cut $1.5 billion to $2 billion in costs in the next five years. Teva is based in Israel but has its Americas headquarters in North Wales, as well as facilities in Horsham, Frazer, Sellersville, and several New Jersey locations. Indeed, part of Levin's concern since taking over as CEO on May 9 has been that the company has 74 locations in 120 countries and that its efforts were not properly focused.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Columnist
How could he choose her? That's been the refrain this week as people question Ben Flajnik's choice of Courtney Robertson as his "forever" on The Bachelor . With two dozen lovely women to pick from, why select a lady so high-maintenance you need a tool chest to take her out for coffee? A personality so volatile that Doppler radar can't keep track of her moods? Call it the Case of the Bachelor's Revenge. (Disclaimer: This is a theory. Cast member's actual motivations may vary.)
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dozens of volunteers carrying yellow federal forms fanned out Wednesday across Camden County - as many did all over New Jersey - to take a census of homeless people and refer them to such services as housing, medical care, and counseling. The state's annual, federally mandated Point-in-Time count of the homeless began at 12:01 a.m. Wednesday and was to end at midnight Thursday - when Pennsylvania was set to begin its count. Maryanne Joyner, 48, was one of about two dozen individuals whom volunteers found at a "tent city" off Route 30 in the shadow of the Ben Franklin Bridge.
NEWS
June 27, 2011 | Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - The number of children injured in Pennsylvania's 767 licensed residential programs is decreasing, but hundreds of children were still hurt in such facilities in the last six years, a newspaper found. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reviewed 361 reports that detail 264 injuries to children from January 2005 through December 2010 at residential facilities that house abused or neglected children, as well as those placed by courts for delinquency or other issues. The injuries included 21 fractured or broken bones and 18 cuts that required stitches, and, according to the newspaper, most were caused by staff members who restrained the children for misbehavior or other reasons.
NEWS
October 13, 2010
An inmate escaped from the Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility in the Northeast early Tuesday, prison officials said. Kevin Turner, 22, was present at a 3:45 a.m. head count but not at an 8:30 a.m. head count, said prison spokesman Robert Eskind. By 11 a.m., prison staff identified him as the missing person. Officials do not know how he escaped. Turner had been held at the prison since March on weapons charges and a burglary case. Officials initially believed Turner may have been hiding somewhere in the prison, but by the end of the day had determined that he appeared to have gotten out of the building.
NEWS
October 13, 2010 | By JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
Officials continued to disagree last night over whether a prisoner at the Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility had escaped or was just missing inside the facility. Kevin Turner, 22, of Lehigh Avenue near Front Street, was being held in the prison on State Road, on drug, firearm and burglary charges. Turner was present for a head count at 3:45 a.m. but not at 8:30 a.m., said Robert Eskind, the public-information officer for the city prison system. Prison officials said last night that they believed that Turner had escaped.
NEWS
March 15, 2010 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael Nutter got a copy of Good News for Modern Man for a freshman religion class at St. Joe's Prep, never knowing he'd need it as mayor of Philadelphia lo these many years later. "This is probably the only book I still have from high school," he said yesterday, clutching the tattered paperback, a version of the Bible. "I had no idea it would come in this handy. " Yesterday was part of Census Sermon Weekend and the mayor was on a road trip "as a census evangelist," he said, asking churchgoers to complete the U.S. census forms scheduled to arrive in mailboxes starting today.
NEWS
October 14, 2009
If city officials believe Philadelphia's population is growing again after six decades of decline, they'd better do everything possible to make sure next year's U.S. census officially confirms the good news. That's going to require an aggressive public-awareness campaign - in effect, a sales job and charm offensive directed at all city residents, but particularly those who might not raise their hands so readily. The city's poorest residents, especially those in minority and immigrant communities, traditionally are most susceptible to being missed by the once-a-decade head count.
NEWS
March 9, 2001
Secretary of Commerce Don Evans has announced that population totals obtained by the 2000 Census would not be statistically adjusted to account for those not counted or those counted twice. Evans had said last month that he alone would decide whether to allow statistical sampling techniques, clearly indicating that, like most Republicans, he opposes such techniques. The reason isn't obscure. When sampling techniques estimate the uncounted, those who are found tend to be in minorities and to vote Democratic.
NEWS
February 15, 2001 | By Tony Pugh, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The 2000 census counted more people and missed fewer minorities and children than the 1990 tally, according to preliminary estimates released yesterday by the U.S. Census Bureau. The data suggest that between 2.7 million and 4 million people - from 1 percent to 1.4 percent of the U.S. population - were not counted in the recent head count, held once every 10 years. That's down from 1.6 percent or four million people who were missed in the 1990 census, which was the first to be less accurate than its predecessor.
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