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Head Lice

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NEWS
October 19, 1997 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Oct. 31, while American children go door to door hunting for treats, British children will be hunting for bugs in their hair. The date marks National Bug Busting day in the United Kingdom, an event established several years ago to confront a head-lice infestation so widespread that it's being called a nationwide epidemic. How bad is the head-lice situation in the United Kingdom? It's so bad that there are now head lice in the House of Commons. Three members of Parliament (two Labor, one Liberal Democrat)
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
I thought my daughter's day-care center was clean. Now she's come home with head lice. To see those bugs in her hair makes my skin crawl. Getting rid of them is so time-consuming. I even had to take a day off from work to wash her hair, comb out the nits, wash the linens and vacuum everything in sight. It's like another thing on my endless list of things to do. Now that I've gone through this once, I sure don't want to do it again. Yet, I'm putting her right back in that environment.
NEWS
March 30, 1988 | By Robin Palley, Daily News Staff Writer
Now, look. Just think how much easier it is to deal with head lice than it used to be. Used to be the preferred treatment was a crew cut for Sweetie. And then all his fellow pupils would make fun of the flat top - and he'd come home, faced streaked with grimy tears and knuckles torn bloody from protecting his dignity. But now your kid probably wants the flat top. Or a mohawk. Or worse. Tell him tough: today the treatment for lice is a shampoo or cream rinse. But watch out as you read on. Your head may start to itch.
NEWS
December 3, 1986 | By Caroline Burns, Special to The Inquirer
About 25 parents of Southampton Township students last week criticized Southampton school officials for failing to keep them informed about the prevention and treatment of head lice. The district has had nine cases of head lice this year in its two school buildings, which have about 800 students in kindergarten through eighth grades, district nurse Nancy Carlson said last week. She said that each case was monitored closely and that the infected students are not permitted back in the classrooom until all lice eggs had been removed from their hair.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
Lice are turning up in classrooms, homes and even on daytime talk shows - and they are harder to get rid of than ever before, according to experts. "There's some evidence that lice may have built up a tolerance to traditional cures, similar to bacteria that build a resistance to some antibiotics," said Dr. Denise Salerno, professor of pediatrics at Temple University Medical Center. Locally, Barkley Elementary School in Phoenixville was closed last week after nearly a quarter of the pupils were discovered to have lice.
LIVING
September 26, 1994 | By Sue Chastain, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's back-to-school time - and the kids are coming home with tales of new friends, pleas for new clothes, and homework assignments. And, possibly, head lice. Upsetting? Embarrassing? Any parent who's had the experience would surely agree. But recent charges about the dangers of the most common treatment for the pesky parasites, prescription shampoos containing the pesticide lindane, raise issues that go far beyond nit-picking. Use of the shampoo (sold under the brand name Kwell and available in a number of generic versions)
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | By Murray Dubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two nights before Halloween, Becky Yacovett was getting Rachel ready for a bath before bed. The water was running when she said to her 7-year-old: "Let me take a look at your head. " That morning, two parents had told Yacovett, home and school head at the Barkley Elementary School in Phoenixville, that they had heard about head lice in school. Heard about it. Parting the shoulder-length brown hair of her daughter, the mother looked at the back of her head. And saw "tiny little things.
NEWS
September 3, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saying that no healthy child should be barred from school, the American Academy of Pediatrics is recommending that schools back off tough head-lice policies. Many schools have "no nit" policies, which say that every single nit - or head louse egg - must be removed before a child can return to school. "The presence of nits, per se, doesn't indicate active infection," said Leonard Weiner, a pediatrics professor at the State University of New York in Syracuse and one of the authors of the report published today in the journal Pediatrics.
NEWS
October 28, 1986 | By Sara Solovitch, Inquirer Staff Writer
In ancient Egypt, lice were considered a status symbol. In one medieval Swedish town, the mayor was chosen by a louse: As the candidates sat with their beards resting along the edge of a round table, one live specimen was dropped in the center. The man whose beard it climbed was declared mayor. Modern-day parents of the three million or so American schoolchildren annually infected with head lice are somewhat less enthralled. Lice are a chronic problem in almost every public and private school in the country - not excluding those in Philadelphia and its suburbs.
LIVING
July 22, 1996 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Linda, a Kimberton, N.J., mother, tried everything to get rid of her family's head lice this summer. She estimates that she spent at least $200 on just about every product available over the counter after her 11-year-old daughter caught the bugs from a playmate. Linda bought shampoos. She bought stuff to loosen nits, the eggs that lice lay at the base of hair shafts. She made numerous trips to the laundromat to wash practically everything in the house. Still, she kept finding nits on her daughter's thick, blond hair and the lice ended up on everyone else in the family as well: Linda, her husband and their 7-year-old daughter.
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NEWS
January 21, 2013
It has become conventional wisdom that Republicans are suffering an internal split that President Obama is successfully exploiting to neuter the House. It is not true, however, that the split is philosophical and fundamental, or that a hopelessly divided GOP is therefore headed for decline, perhaps irrelevance. In fact, the split is tactical, not philosophical; short-term, not fundamental. And therefore quite solvable. How do we know? Simple thought experiment: Imagine if we had a Republican president.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2008 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Venture-capital investing in 2007 reached a six-year high of $661.8 million in the Philadelphia area and $29.4 billion nationally, led by strong interest in life sciences, so-called clean technology and Internet-related businesses. An Audubon firm, Globus Medical Inc., attracted $110 million of venture capital in 2007, tying with a San Diego firm, CardioNet Inc., for the year's biggest venture investment, according to a quarterly industry analysis. Globus develops spinal-implant devices that improve mobility for people with back problems.
NEWS
June 12, 2005 | By April Saul INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For many years, I've been a photojournalist and a single mother, but only in my wildest dreams have I ever been an actress. Still, just recently I did manage to land onstage in a hit musical. The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, a celebration of the quirky entrants in a junior high bee, charmed critics and audiences enough to earn both a Tony nomination and a move from New York's Second Stage Theater to Broadway's Circle in the Square last month. Though my run in the show was limited to a single Wednesday matinee, the singularity of my performance made it wildly unforgettable - at least for me. True, I was an audience participant, handpicked from a lobby of theatergoers, asked whether I was a decent speller, and along with three others, rushed backstage to be prepped.
NEWS
December 15, 2003 | By Ron Hutcheson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The White House invoked a "no gloating" rule yesterday after Saddam Hussein's capture, but there is little doubt that the development was sweet revenge for President Bush. More than a decade after Hussein emerged unscathed from the 1991 Persian Gulf War, Bush finished the job started by his father and settled a family score. Within hours of Hussein's capture, the video image of the unkempt former dictator being checked for head lice all but erased memories of a gloating Hussein declaring victory after the 1991 war. Bush announced the capture, without any sign of emotion, in a three-minute speech shortly before yesterday's afternoon football games started.
NEWS
September 3, 2002 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saying that no healthy child should be barred from school, the American Academy of Pediatrics is recommending that schools back off tough head-lice policies. Many schools have "no nit" policies, which say that every single nit - or head louse egg - must be removed before a child can return to school. "The presence of nits, per se, doesn't indicate active infection," said Leonard Weiner, a pediatrics professor at the State University of New York in Syracuse and one of the authors of the report published today in the journal Pediatrics.
NEWS
April 7, 1999 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fog lifts from the mountains, wood fires crackle, children tumble out of tents made of willow branches and plastic, women haul laundry to the riverbank, cows drink from muddy puddles and men with big, greasy hands fix their tractors as a boy, oblivious to the misery around him, runs laughing through the smoke with an open umbrella. Day breaks in Kukes. Soon, the sick babies cry, the bread truck comes, the women crack eggs and the men roll cigarettes and wonder if they'll ever see their farms again.
NEWS
November 17, 1998 | By Murray Dubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two nights before Halloween, Becky Yacovett was getting Rachel ready for a bath before bed. The water was running when she said to her 7-year-old: "Let me take a look at your head. " That morning, two parents had told Yacovett, home and school head at the Barkley Elementary School in Phoenixville, that they had heard about head lice in school. Heard about it. Parting the shoulder-length brown hair of her daughter, the mother looked at the back of her head. And saw "tiny little things.
NEWS
November 11, 1998 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
Lice are turning up in classrooms, homes and even on daytime talk shows - and they are harder to get rid of than ever before, according to experts. "There's some evidence that lice may have built up a tolerance to traditional cures, similar to bacteria that build a resistance to some antibiotics," said Dr. Denise Salerno, professor of pediatrics at Temple University Medical Center. Locally, Barkley Elementary School in Phoenixville was closed last week after nearly a quarter of the pupils were discovered to have lice.
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On Oct. 31, while American children go door to door hunting for treats, British children will be hunting for bugs in their hair. The date marks National Bug Busting day in the United Kingdom, an event established several years ago to confront a head-lice infestation so widespread that it's being called a nationwide epidemic. How bad is the head-lice situation in the United Kingdom? It's so bad that there are now head lice in the House of Commons. Three members of Parliament (two Labor, one Liberal Democrat)
LIVING
July 22, 1996 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Linda, a Kimberton, N.J., mother, tried everything to get rid of her family's head lice this summer. She estimates that she spent at least $200 on just about every product available over the counter after her 11-year-old daughter caught the bugs from a playmate. Linda bought shampoos. She bought stuff to loosen nits, the eggs that lice lay at the base of hair shafts. She made numerous trips to the laundromat to wash practically everything in the house. Still, she kept finding nits on her daughter's thick, blond hair and the lice ended up on everyone else in the family as well: Linda, her husband and their 7-year-old daughter.
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