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Headgear

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SPORTS
October 9, 1997 | By Beth Onufrak, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Jessica Hollinshead's blue eyes sparkle out of an unmarked face, but her dark blonde hair hides a fresh scar that runs from ear to ear across the top of her head - the result of a devastating field-hockey accident last month that fractured several bones around her left eye. Now, after some skillful plastic surgery that involved four titanium plates being inserted into her head, she's back on the sidelines, cheering on her Jenkintown High School...
NEWS
July 3, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / ELIZABETH ROBERTSON
Sporting Revolutionary headgear, Salvadoran John Joseph Martinez Housley, 7, of Lancaster, waits to become a citizen in ceremonies yesterday outside Independence Hall.
NEWS
July 12, 2012 | Molly Eichel
SO WE NEED to talk about the hat. Tuesday morning, Ralph Lauren unveiled the look that the U.S. Olympic team will wear at the London games' opening ceremonies later this month. The men will wear navy double-breasted blazers, with a red-and-navy tie and cream-colored flat-front pants. Ladies get a knee-length cream skirt, paired with a single-breasted blazer and a red, white and blue scarf.   But here's the problem: Both genders are saddled with a beret, complete with red-and-white stripe.
SPORTS
May 25, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Peter McNeeley, Mike Tyson is watching you. The former world heavyweight champion announced yesterday that he will return to the ring Aug. 19, for the first time in four years, against the relatively unthreatening McNeeley, at Las Vegas's MGM Grand Hotel. Tyson, appearing as confident and cocky as ever, if less surly, enjoyed a coming-out party of sorts yesterday, touching on subjects ranging from protective headgear in boxing to changes in how he prepares to fight. One subject he would not discuss was his adoption of the Muslim faith.
SPORTS
July 22, 1996 | by Rich Hofmann, Daily News Sports Columnist
Too young. Too inexperienced. The U.S. boxing team has read its advance notices, and promptly trashed them. Still miles from medals, the United States nevertheless has four pretty convincing winners in four tries. You say that boxing is an individual sport. These guys swear it's a team sport at the Olympics. The team has assembled in the stands for each American match, whistling and cheering, and they all insist a very special kind of momentum is being built. "This is a plus for our team, sending a message out to a lot of people who have been writing negative things about this team," assistant coach Jesse Ravelo said.
NEWS
February 10, 1993 | By Galina Espinoza, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
During his four years at Maple Shade High School, senior Frank Smith has routinely worn caps to school. And just as routinely, he has had them taken away. Under the school's dress code, students are not allowed to wear any type of headgear once they step inside the building. Students typically receive one warning to remove their hats before they are confiscated by a teacher or administrator. It is then up to school officials to decide whether the hat is returned to the student.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2009 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
It was an injured shoulder eight years ago that forced Anna Tumas to give up her beloved knitting, an art form she had learned growing up in Germany. So when she faced a very shrunken wool sweater after accidentally washing it in hot water, the lightbulb went on. For the last several years, this Cinnaminson woman has taken the loveliest old wool and cashmere sweaters she can find and recrafted them into baby sweaters. Shelves in her home workroom bulge with a rhapsody of pastels, brights, and occasional print sweaters seized like pirate's booty at thrift shops and yard sales.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 12, 2012 | Molly Eichel
SO WE NEED to talk about the hat. Tuesday morning, Ralph Lauren unveiled the look that the U.S. Olympic team will wear at the London games' opening ceremonies later this month. The men will wear navy double-breasted blazers, with a red-and-navy tie and cream-colored flat-front pants. Ladies get a knee-length cream skirt, paired with a single-breasted blazer and a red, white and blue scarf.   But here's the problem: Both genders are saddled with a beret, complete with red-and-white stripe.
SPORTS
August 5, 2010 | By LES BOWEN, bowenl@phillynews.com
BETHLEHEM - You can't hit opponents in the head or neck anymore. Sort of. Sometimes. The NFL sent a traveling officiating contingent to Eagles training camp yesterday, and that was the upshot of one of the rules changes for 2010. Basically, the league has tweaked rules that were in place last season, but perhaps in a way that will lead to more debate and confusion over what is or is not a penalty. For example, if a receiver has caught the ball and has not had time to protect himself, a defender can't launch into him and hit him in the head or neck area.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2010 | Compiled from The Inquirer, Associated Press, Bloomberg News
"I think it's an injustice. I'm a proud American who did the best I could for my country and this is how they reward me. " - Bradley Birkenfeld, a whistle-blower in a tax-evasion probe of UBS AG, as he reported to prison for helping clients hide hundreds of millions of dollars and evade U.S. taxes "Make no mistake about it, this case is about more than just hats. " - DeMaurice Smith, executive director of the National Football League Players Association, on the Supreme Court battle over who gets to make official NFL headgear logos "The Europeans should focus the conversation on the economic issues of climate change, the green jobs, the recovery.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2009 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
It was an injured shoulder eight years ago that forced Anna Tumas to give up her beloved knitting, an art form she had learned growing up in Germany. So when she faced a very shrunken wool sweater after accidentally washing it in hot water, the lightbulb went on. For the last several years, this Cinnaminson woman has taken the loveliest old wool and cashmere sweaters she can find and recrafted them into baby sweaters. Shelves in her home workroom bulge with a rhapsody of pastels, brights, and occasional print sweaters seized like pirate's booty at thrift shops and yard sales.
SPORTS
September 5, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Protective headgear and body protectors could make their international debut at the Women's World Cup this month. In a circular to national associations, FIFA General-Secretary Urs Linsi confirmed the equipment, already being used by some professional women players in the United States, is acceptable. "Modern protective equipment, such as headgear, facemasks, knee and arm protectors made of soft, lightweight, padded material are not considered dangerous and are therefore permitted," Linsi said.
NEWS
August 15, 2003 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Only days after Philadelphia police officials agreed to let male officers grow beards for religious or health reasons, a patrolwoman faces dismissal for wearing her Muslim head covering, or hijab, to work. Officer Kimberlie Webb, 40, a converted Sunni Muslim and an eight-year police veteran, said she was sent home early Tuesday from her midnight-to-8 shift after she showed up for roll call wearing - for the first time - a dark blue scarf wrapped around her head and neck, beneath her uniform cap. If she shows up with it again, Police Commissioner Sylvester M. Johnson says, she will be fired.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Robert Berman is standing in the middle of his showroom floor, talking loudly, and wearing a 3-foot foam cheesesteak on his head. It is not an especially remarkable scene. Berman, 35, makes goofy, outrageous and otherwise bizarre headgear and costumes for a living, to the tune of about $2 million annually in sales. His wares can be found in Target stores nationally, and in area Halloween stores seasonally. His business, Rasta Imposta, was born when the economics-graduate-turned-playwright spent the summer on Long Beach Island in 1992.
NEWS
February 2, 2002 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Just as the popularity of the sleek Xootrs, Razors and Gizmos is waning, the New Jersey state Assembly is considering a bill requiring children under 14 to wear helmets while riding the scooters. If the measure becomes law, New Jersey would become the second state with such a law; New York passed a similar law in November, while Pennsylvania's version remains in committee. The Garden State already requires helmets for children on bicycles, skateboards and in-line skates. The legislation would be named in memory of Andy Alexis Pino, an Elizabeth, N.J., boy killed when he rode his scooter down his driveway and into the path of a car, Assemblywoman Linda Greenstein (D., Middlesex)
NEWS
October 10, 1999 | VICKI VALERIO / Inquirer Staff Photographer
Mayors wear many hats during their tenure. For Columbus Day tomorrow, Mayor Rendell may well don a plumed Italian number. But yesterday's Viking Day called for serious headgear. His fists simulate the fabled rowing prowess of Viking explorers.
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