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Healing

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NEWS
March 7, 1987
I cannot resist commenting on the Feb. 19 article "Penn medical school to throw out course requirements for admission. " I agree that medical students should pursue a broad undergraduate program. Extra medical courses taken at the undergraduate level only put undue pressure on the student and do not serve a useful purpose as these courses are repeated in medical school. Medical students must learn that a patient is more than a body to be treated. Successful healing of a person must take into account the role a person's mind plays in the healing process.
NEWS
January 11, 1990
Every once in a while just a quick skim of the headlines can provide an insight into just which way the world is going these days. Consider the two headlines that appeared on the front of yesterday's business section of The Inquirer. "Layoffs planned by Hahnemann to balance cuts," read one over a story about how Hahnemann University Hospital was making staff cutbacks because of reduced government funding for health care. Right next to it was another headline: "Scouring the world for workers to open Trump's Taj Mahal," above an article detailing the critical shortage of casino workers.
NEWS
April 24, 1995 | By Larry Copeland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some came in their Sunday best. Some wore their everyday jeans, denim skirts and western hats. Many of them wept as their political and spiritual leaders led them through the healing ritual. Others sat stoically, their emotions known to them alone. From all over the city, and much of the state, Oklahomans came to the state fairgrounds yesterday to share their grief in a way that lessened it somehow, to defy the hate-mongers who made this day necessary, and to begin restoring themselves.
NEWS
October 30, 2005
On a mild September evening at Benjamin Franklin High School at Broad and Spring Garden Streets, about 80 people gathered to talk about their experiences with violence and why they are participating in the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program's "All Join Hands: Visions of Peace" project. A mural on the school's wall will rise in the coming months with images generated from participants' comments and through workshops and other gatherings. Here is a sampling of the stories that were told that night.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2010 | By Nick Cristiano, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the many highlights of The Well , Charlie Musselwhite's stirring new album, is a song called "Sad and Beautiful World. " Featuring his old friend Mavis Staples on guest vocals, it was inspired by the murder of his 93-year-old mother in her Memphis home in 2005. The key line is: "Let the blues heal what's been torn apart. " For Musselwhite, the blues more than any other music is all about healing and survival. "That's the nature of the blues," the 66-year-old singer, songwriter, guitarist and harmonica virtuoso says over the phone from a bus near Portland, Ore., while touring with Cyndi Lauper.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | By David McClendon, Special to The Inquirer
In a suite of modern offices perched above Main Street, the 20 students were learning a 5,000-year-old Asian practice that, some say, is almost as essential to human health as food and water. The students were learning shiatsu (pronounced she-AH-tzoo), an ancient Japanese healing art. They were gathered Saturday in Doylestown, the unlikely headquarters of the International School of Shiatsu, which has branches in England, Switzerland and Italy. Shiatsu, said Saul Goodman, the school's director and founder, is sometimes compared to massage but is actually a technique that incorporates the principles of acupuncture - substituting fingertips for needles.
NEWS
October 11, 1998 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Gary Moore, a 37-year-old Toms River police officer, went to Ocean County Sports Rehab for back problems after a car accident, his physical therapist recommended he wear a magnet. "I didn't want to go out with this big magnet strapped to me," Moore said, but the therapist had just the thing - a magnetic device in the form of a sparkling gold chain. Golfers are walking the greens with magnets hidden under their polo shirts and tucked into their shoes. An orthopedist in Texas suggests some of his back-pain patients wear magnets in their underwear.
NEWS
April 28, 2002 | By Nedra Lindsey INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Perhaps more than ever, or at least in recent months, everyone needs a healing - that is Bobbi Trzaska's take on it. Not the kind that requires a doctor's prescription. The kind that comes from within. "It is time for everyone to let go of their inhibitions and fears and step forward into healing themselves," said Trzaska, a Medford-based yoga teacher and practitioner of reiki, a healing technique. Trzaska is organizing a Day of Healing at the YMCA of Burlington County.
NEWS
December 2, 1999 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
For Dr. Dan Gottlieb, the family therapist and soothing radio voice, Hanukkah ushers in a dark season of introspection, even brooding, about the accident that left him a quadriplegic 20 years ago this month. Yet the Jewish festival of lights that begins tomorrow at sundown is also his season of healing, and of hope. Much of Gottlieb's dramatic story is nearly as well known as his confiding tone that dissects relationships with callers on "Voices of the Family," WHYY (91-FM)
SPORTS
July 12, 2011 | Daily News Staff and Wire
With all the free time on his hands, Eagles defensive end Brandon Graham has taken up golf. Graham's skill on the links were on display yesterday at a charity event in Ann Arbor, Mich., to support the Jalen Rose Leadership Academy. Like Rose, Graham is a former Michigan player. Graham has been doing most of the rehab work on his right knee in the Los Angeles area. Eagles coach Andy Reid has said the 2010 first-round pick is not expected to be ready when the season begins. Graham told the Associated Press he is to see Dr. James Andrews this week and hopes to be cleared to practice in September.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 7, 2016 | By Erin McCarthy and Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITERS
Aaron Altherr is on his way back. The 25-year-old Phillies outfielder, who injured his left wrist when diving for a ball in spring training, began taking live batting practice and could begin a minor-league rehab assignment next week. The damage was severe, as the sheath that holds the wrist tendon in place was torn. The Phillies originally said that Altherr, who has a history of wrist problems, would miss four to six months after surgery on March 9. If he spends the maximum 20 days on his rehab assignment, his recovery time will fall around the five-month mark.
NEWS
June 22, 2016
Natalie Pompilio is a Philadelphia writer BRUSSELS - On a warm afternoon one month after coordinated terrorist attacks claimed 32 lives, the city center was bustling with people shopping, eating, chatting, watching street acrobats twist, and listening to a local radio station's live broadcast. An organized city cleanup was underway, and its volunteers - wearing yellow ponchos and carrying sticks to pick up litter - were getting a prework pep talk. I stood behind a family - two parents, two children - who were buying waffles to snack on while they strolled.
NEWS
June 20, 2016
Exactly one year ago, I was assaulted in my neighborhood. It's not the sort of anniversary you want to celebrate, but one you can't help but remember. During the attack, I believed the stranger could kill me. Thankfully, I escaped only badly beaten and robbed. My assailant was never caught. In the months following, I dealt with some of the typical post-traumatic psychological issues. But my most lingering fear wasn't that I would be attacked again. I was afraid of becoming a different person.
NEWS
June 19, 2016
Reading and Writing Cancer How Words Heal By Susan Gubar W.W. Norton. 240 pp. $26.95 Reviewed by Janet Falon Words heal. Reading them. Writing them. Both. In Reading and Writing Cancer by Susan Gubar, you're taught how to use words to write about your cancer experience in a healing way, and how to read and be enriched by the words of writers (and some visual artists) whose work springs from their own encounter with this ubiquitous disease.
NEWS
June 10, 2016
ISSUE | SEXUAL ABUSE Pa. bill essential to heal victims and church Passage of Pennsylvania House Bill 1947, which would remove the statute of limitations for criminal prosecution for child sexual abuse and raise the age at which a victim may file a civil suit to 50, is critically important ("Justice or financial ruin? Two views on a Pa. bill," Sunday). Contrary to the scare tactics of Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, this bill would work to purge the Catholic Church of the stigma of clergy abuse and reduce the possibility of abuse, revitalizing the priority of children and families.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
There is a bill before the state Senate that would do something real - something lasting - for survivors of sexual abuse. Something that would allow so many the opportunity for justice they have long been denied. Something that could help them heal - that could help them ease and carry their burdens. Passed by the House on April 12, H.B. 1947 would eliminate the criminal statute of limitations for sexual abuse and extend the civil statutes by 20 years, until victims turn 50. It would allow victims to sue over abuse that occurred decades ago. The bill does not go far enough.
NEWS
April 12, 2016
BALTIMORE - A year after the death of Freddie Gray, a small part of his legacy can be seen at a southwest Baltimore recreation center, where the pounding of basketballs and squeak of sneakers echo off the walls as young black men in shorts and sweats face off. Ken Hurst, a white policeman, watches from the side, a bum knee the only thing that keeps him from playing. He visits the game each week, not to make arrests but to make friends. "I need them to realize I'm not out here to lock everyone up," he says.
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
Nobody says J.S. Bach cures post-traumatic stress disorder. But few would be surprised if his music helped, whether it is the Goldberg Variations , heard after the Paris terror attacks last November, or the St. Matthew Passion on the day after the Brussels suicide bombings last month. Not every composer writes music with medicinal effects. Mahler's darker symphonies could make a bad day even worse. Yet Bach (despite the furrowed brow and 18th-century wig seen in formal portraits)
NEWS
April 5, 2016 | By Arthur L. Satterwhite III
We can't ignore the truth: America has a disgraceful history of racial prejudice and racially motivated violence. While we would like to think that this is a problem of the past, recent events prove otherwise. Over the last 18 months, simmering racial tensions have boiled over across the United States. Thankfully, Philadelphia has not made national news, but in Ferguson, Baltimore, Staten Island, North Charleston, and Cleveland, the reality of racial tensions rose to the fore, surprising many within these communities and beyond.
NEWS
March 13, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
Like so many who had come to the recent Mind Your Brain conference at Penn Medicine, Janine Kirby wanted to talk about hope. Hers was hard-earned. After a series of concussions from soccer, "life stuff," and boxing, the blow that turned her into a brain injury survivor came at work on 12/12/12, a rare string of numbers that she can remember. A steel beam crashed into her head. From there, she rode a helicopter to Penn. Eighteen months into her recovery, she started having seizures so severe that doctors had to remove her entire right temporal lobe because it was crippled by scar tissue.
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