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NEWS
June 19, 1996 | JIM MacMILLAN/ DAILY NEWS
Members of the Army National Guard 108th Combat Support Hospital set up a traveling combat hospital yesterday, near Memorial Hall in Fairmount Park. The 108th, with the Department of Health, will hold a health fair Friday, Saturday and Sunday, with free mammograms, immunizations, blood tests and physicals. For information, call 215-686-5026.
NEWS
November 30, 2012
ALDOUS HUXLEY once made this chilling observation: "A really efficient totalitarian state would be one in which the all-powerful executive of political bosses and their army of managers control a population of slaves who do not have to be coerced, because they love their servitude. " I thought of this in the days after the election, as the Left and the Right started arguing about what this country will look like in four more years. Those of us who did not vote for Barack Obama fear that the 2.0 version of his administration will permanently move us from a nation of makers to a nation of takers.
FOOD
July 30, 1986 | Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carbohydrates came into their own last week, as gourmet fare at the 32d annual International Fancy Food and Confection Show. Not the usual sugary simple carbohydrates, mind you, but the complex, all- natural, "health-food" kind of carbohydrates: breads, beans, grains and, yes, more pasta. That is not to say that fewer chocolatiers and candy companies were represented in the miles of aisles at the show at the Javits Convention Center. But this is one of the largest trade shows in the country, having grown to 700 exhibitors from 20 countries.
NEWS
March 31, 1996 | For The Inquirer / MICHAEL PLUNKETT
It's often said that laughter is the best medicine. And that appears to have been the case last weekend at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey's School of Osteopathic Medicine in Stratford. The school held a "fun" raiser for benefit of the Ronald McDonald House of Camden County. The health fair/carnival featured clowns, magicians, music, games, raffles and food.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | By Dave Urbanski, Special to The Inquirer
Pitman officials tomorrow will implement the Lipari Information Network (LINK), a federally funded project designed to track the health of residents who lived near the contaminated Lipari Landfill between 1967 and 1984. The 16-acre site off Route 322 near the Mantua-Pitman border closed in 1971 after nearby residents complained of respiratory problems and nausea. It heads the federal Superfund toxic cleanup list. Councilman Douglas Stuart said officials would outline the project's goals and procedures at the news conference set for 2:30 p.m. tomorrow in Pitman Council chambers.
NEWS
March 5, 2013 | By Maria Cheng, Associated Press
LONDON - Despite six decades of free medical care and widespread health campaigns, Britons are among the unhealthiest people in Western Europe, a new study says. International researchers analyzed the country's rates of sickness and death from 1990 to 2010 compared with those of 15 other Western European countries in addition to Australia, Canada, and the United States. Experts described the U.K. results as "startling" and said Britain was failing to address underlying health risks in its population, including rising rates of high blood pressure, obesity, and drug and alcohol abuse.
LIVING
September 28, 1986 | By Jennifer Harper, Special to The Inquirer
Walk into a bookstore in any mall, and you'll find a shelf full of America's most hair-raising volumes: the symptom books. One peek, and the reader is lost in fascinated dread. Osteoporosis, AIDS, Alzheimer's disease. The human body looks dismally vulnerable. It never occurred to the hapless reader that all these things could go wrong. Forget meaningful relationships, money-market funds and the bomb - Americans have a number-one topic: their health. Health information is everywhere, from the earnest eyewitness reporter on the evening news to heavyweight medical articles in general-interest magazines.
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | By Beth Wagner, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Despite exhausting its own funding, the Health Care Cost Containment Council will continue to operate while the Casey administration searches for a survival strategy. Joe Martin, spokesman for the council, said employees would continue to work without the assurance that they would be paid. As of yesterday, the council already had compiled a debt of $33,437 in operating expenses. The council was not allocated any money in the state budget passed last month because the administration planned to transfer the council's functions to the Insurance Department.
NEWS
February 21, 1987
The sad spoiling of a once-thriving Pennsylvania stream by a discharge of manure reveals once more the destructive impact of reliance on meat and other products gained at the expense of animals. It is dependence on meat, cheese, eggs and other animal products that accounts for the intensive agricultural practices that are destroying America's topsoil. This same dietary predilection is in part responsible for the destruction of rain forests and other wild lands, here and abroad, as millions of acres are razed in order to graze cattle or to grow crops fed to animals.
NEWS
January 1, 1994 | By CALVIN TRILLIN
When there was widespread press coverage recently of a study indicating that moderate drinking reduces the risk of heart attacks, I figured that a news item about health that wouldn't cause any controversy at our local saloon, Matty's Tap, had finally come along. A news item on any subject is likely to cause some controversy at Matty's Tap. At least once an evening, discussions tend to heat up to the point at which Matty is forced to slam his hand on the bar and remind the assembled of the house rules of combat: "Don't shout, or you're out. " Normally, studies about how everyday habits might affect your health are particularly controversial at Matty's.
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BUSINESS
May 21, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER jadelman@phillynews.com 215-854-2615 @jacobadelman
Health Partners Plans has renewed its lease at the Gallery at Market East ahead of the Center City shopping mall's planned redevelopment, a lawyer for the site's operators said Tuesday. Richard Hayden, an attorney for Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust and Macerich Co., said at a city Planning Commission meeting that the health insurance provider would remain at the site. Health Partners occupies 142,100 square feet at the Gallery, according to PREIT's website. PREIT and Macerich have announced plans for a $325 million upgrade of the Market Street property into what they're calling Fashion Outlets of Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Reena Khan got health insurance the day before giving birth to her daughter. The 26-year-old had lost her job-based insurance three weeks earlier. She said her employer let her go when she couldn't continue working as a home health aide because she was pregnant. Desperate, Khan called the Pennsylvania Health Access Network, a statewide nonprofit that helps people find affordable health insurance. "I didn't want to be without insurance for me and my baby," said Khan, a Pakistani native who immigrated to the United States five years ago and settled with her family in Northeast Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE PHILADELPHIA School District wants to upgrade and expand health services, officials announced yesterday, but could it come at the expense of school nurses? Superintendent William Hite said the district will explore the option to contract with private providers to offer students more access to health services, which have been drastically reduced because of budget cuts, leaving many schools without a full-time nurse. He said the move does not mean the district will get rid of the 183 nurses it employs.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
For Pat O'Brien, Feb. 15 was just another winter Sunday. The Huntingdon Valley nurse had always had job-based health insurance. So she didn't realize Feb. 15 was the last day to buy Affordable Care Act marketplace coverage for 2015. But on that unseasonably warm day, O'Brien and her husband, Joe, a retired police officer, needed health insurance. Two weeks earlier, O'Brien had lost her job, and with it, their benefits. "I had no idea, because I didn't need it," said O'Brien, 60. "I've had insurance my whole life.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Genesis Healthcare Inc., a major nursing home and rehabilitation company based in Kennett Square, said it opened a post-hospital rehabiliation facility in China, its first venture outside the United States. "With 14.8 percent of the Chinese population over the age of 60 and 70 million people in need of rehabilitation services, there is significant market potential in China," George V. Hager Jr., Genesis's chief executive, said. The new Genesis facility, called a "Vitality Center," is in Zengcheng, which is in southern China, near Guangzhou.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia is well-known as medicine central, with one of the nation's highest concentrations of hospitals and specialists. But a new University of Pennsylvania study finds that in health care, as in so many other realms that intersect with economics, there are two Philadelphias. In certain low-income neighborhoods, the Penn researchers counted close to 3,000 adults for every primary-care provider. That translates into some residents having to wait months for an appointment.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
RACERS HAVE plenty to focus on during a 10-mile run. How to keep a man's heart beating and lungs pumping isn't usually one of them. But that's exactly what a group of about 12 health-care workers competing in the Broad Street Run went through on Sunday when one of their own collapsed right in front of them. Thanks to their efforts, that 31-year-old man is alive today. After seeing their colleague off in an ambulance, those lifesavers all went on to finish the race. "People stopped out of the kindness of their hearts as soon as he went down," said Kristen, a physician's assistant who didn't want her last name published.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas Jefferson University and Abington Health completed their affiliation last week, according to a notice to bondholders Monday. Under the arrangement, Jefferson's board will be reconstituted to have 11 members each from Jefferson and Abington. Two unaffiliated members of the new board are to be picked later. Abington, which has two hospitals in Montgomery County - Abington Memorial and Lansdale Hospital - will be a subsidiary of Thomas Jefferson University. Jefferson and Abington announced their definitive agreement in January.
NEWS
May 3, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Healthy Pennsylvania was supposed to be former Gov. Tom Corbett's signature effort, a private-market plan designed to qualify the state for millions in Medicaid expansion dollars while mollifying foes of the Affordable Care Act. But when Corbett lost his reelection bid in November to Democrat Tom Wolf, who had vowed to replace Healthy Pennsylvania with traditional Medicaid expansion, many people thought the Republican would shelve the complex hybrid...
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the latest whiplash-inducing turn of events at Stockton University, its outgoing president said Tuesday he is stepping down immediately rather than four months from now, as the school initially announced. Herman J. Saatkamp Jr., amid controversy over his stymied attempt to locate a Stockton campus in the former Showboat casino in Atlantic City, announced last week that he would step down some time after Aug. 31. On Tuesday, he announced he was taking an immediate medical leave. Harvey Kesselman, the university's provost, will become acting president.
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