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NEWS
June 19, 1996 | JIM MacMILLAN/ DAILY NEWS
Members of the Army National Guard 108th Combat Support Hospital set up a traveling combat hospital yesterday, near Memorial Hall in Fairmount Park. The 108th, with the Department of Health, will hold a health fair Friday, Saturday and Sunday, with free mammograms, immunizations, blood tests and physicals. For information, call 215-686-5026.
NEWS
November 30, 2012
ALDOUS HUXLEY once made this chilling observation: "A really efficient totalitarian state would be one in which the all-powerful executive of political bosses and their army of managers control a population of slaves who do not have to be coerced, because they love their servitude. " I thought of this in the days after the election, as the Left and the Right started arguing about what this country will look like in four more years. Those of us who did not vote for Barack Obama fear that the 2.0 version of his administration will permanently move us from a nation of makers to a nation of takers.
FOOD
July 30, 1986 | Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carbohydrates came into their own last week, as gourmet fare at the 32d annual International Fancy Food and Confection Show. Not the usual sugary simple carbohydrates, mind you, but the complex, all- natural, "health-food" kind of carbohydrates: breads, beans, grains and, yes, more pasta. That is not to say that fewer chocolatiers and candy companies were represented in the miles of aisles at the show at the Javits Convention Center. But this is one of the largest trade shows in the country, having grown to 700 exhibitors from 20 countries.
NEWS
March 31, 1996 | For The Inquirer / MICHAEL PLUNKETT
It's often said that laughter is the best medicine. And that appears to have been the case last weekend at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey's School of Osteopathic Medicine in Stratford. The school held a "fun" raiser for benefit of the Ronald McDonald House of Camden County. The health fair/carnival featured clowns, magicians, music, games, raffles and food.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | By Dave Urbanski, Special to The Inquirer
Pitman officials tomorrow will implement the Lipari Information Network (LINK), a federally funded project designed to track the health of residents who lived near the contaminated Lipari Landfill between 1967 and 1984. The 16-acre site off Route 322 near the Mantua-Pitman border closed in 1971 after nearby residents complained of respiratory problems and nausea. It heads the federal Superfund toxic cleanup list. Councilman Douglas Stuart said officials would outline the project's goals and procedures at the news conference set for 2:30 p.m. tomorrow in Pitman Council chambers.
NEWS
March 5, 2013 | By Maria Cheng, Associated Press
LONDON - Despite six decades of free medical care and widespread health campaigns, Britons are among the unhealthiest people in Western Europe, a new study says. International researchers analyzed the country's rates of sickness and death from 1990 to 2010 compared with those of 15 other Western European countries in addition to Australia, Canada, and the United States. Experts described the U.K. results as "startling" and said Britain was failing to address underlying health risks in its population, including rising rates of high blood pressure, obesity, and drug and alcohol abuse.
LIVING
September 28, 1986 | By Jennifer Harper, Special to The Inquirer
Walk into a bookstore in any mall, and you'll find a shelf full of America's most hair-raising volumes: the symptom books. One peek, and the reader is lost in fascinated dread. Osteoporosis, AIDS, Alzheimer's disease. The human body looks dismally vulnerable. It never occurred to the hapless reader that all these things could go wrong. Forget meaningful relationships, money-market funds and the bomb - Americans have a number-one topic: their health. Health information is everywhere, from the earnest eyewitness reporter on the evening news to heavyweight medical articles in general-interest magazines.
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | By Beth Wagner, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Despite exhausting its own funding, the Health Care Cost Containment Council will continue to operate while the Casey administration searches for a survival strategy. Joe Martin, spokesman for the council, said employees would continue to work without the assurance that they would be paid. As of yesterday, the council already had compiled a debt of $33,437 in operating expenses. The council was not allocated any money in the state budget passed last month because the administration planned to transfer the council's functions to the Insurance Department.
NEWS
February 21, 1987
The sad spoiling of a once-thriving Pennsylvania stream by a discharge of manure reveals once more the destructive impact of reliance on meat and other products gained at the expense of animals. It is dependence on meat, cheese, eggs and other animal products that accounts for the intensive agricultural practices that are destroying America's topsoil. This same dietary predilection is in part responsible for the destruction of rain forests and other wild lands, here and abroad, as millions of acres are razed in order to graze cattle or to grow crops fed to animals.
NEWS
January 1, 1994 | By CALVIN TRILLIN
When there was widespread press coverage recently of a study indicating that moderate drinking reduces the risk of heart attacks, I figured that a news item about health that wouldn't cause any controversy at our local saloon, Matty's Tap, had finally come along. A news item on any subject is likely to cause some controversy at Matty's Tap. At least once an evening, discussions tend to heat up to the point at which Matty is forced to slam his hand on the bar and remind the assembled of the house rules of combat: "Don't shout, or you're out. " Normally, studies about how everyday habits might affect your health are particularly controversial at Matty's.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 25, 2015 | By Joel Wee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matthew Lee, 29, a Ph.D. student from the University of Pennsylvania's nursing school, received a Fulbright Scholarship. His research focuses on how video games can be applied to therapeutic use. Lee, a Cerritos, Calif., native, previously was awarded an International Game Developers Association scholarship for his work with video games and mental health. He has eight years of experience in developing games and was trained as a game designer. In 2014, he founded game design studio AFK Studios, which was invited to the 2014 G-20 Global Business Challenge in Australia to talk about how video games could address global challenges with water-related issues.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A subsidiary of Philadelphia-based AmeriHealth Caritas was one of four companies selected by Iowa officials to participate in the management of the state's $4.2 billion Medicaid program, which serves about 560,000, officials announced Tuesday. AmeriHealth and the other winners - units of Anthem Inc., UnitedHealth Group Inc., and WellCare Health Plans Inc. - will compete statewide for Medicaid beneficiaries under the program, which starts Jan. 1, 2016. Iowa officials picked four of 10 health insurer applicants that completed the process.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Temple Health cardiovascular surgeon has started working full-time at Brandywine Hospital, in Chester County, the two organizations said. Brandywine Hospital, near Coatesville, is owned by publicly-traded Community Health Systems Inc., which also owns Chestnut Hill Hospital, Phoenixville Hospital, Jennersville Hospital, and Memorial Hospital of Salem County. Brandywine is licensed to operate 169 beds. Larry Kaiser, chief executive of Temple University Health System, said the arrangement "will bring Temple's renowned cardiovascular surgery program closer to where patients live.
NEWS
August 17, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The battle over President Obama's clean power plan - in Congress and the courts, in the realms of commerce and common conversation - will rage for some time. But few are debating the value of the potential health benefits, which are expected to be significant. In the final rule announced Aug. 3, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has set a goal of reducing carbon pollution from the power-generating sector by 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. This major climate-change initiative focuses on power plants because they are a major contributor to carbon pollution, accounting for one-third of all carbon emissions in the U.S. The EPA has predicted that once the reductions are met, Americans will avoid up to 90,000 asthma attacks a year.
NEWS
August 16, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
In February, the country was stunned by a measles outbreak in California that highlighted how many adults and children were not immunized. Since then, the Pennsylvania Department of Health has redoubled efforts to improve the state's immunization rates. Now, as another school year is about to begin, Physician General Rachel Levine is pushing to end Pennsylvania's eight-month grace period, which is far longer than that of most other states. It has meant that kids can be in kindergarten almost an entire academic year without getting required immunizations.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania Health System has named Thomas E. Beeman chief operating officer for its regional operations, including Chester County Hospital and the recently acquired Lancaster General Health, where Beeman was chief executive. Beeman's responsibilities will include all UPHS services outside Philadelphia, including inpatient, ambulatory, and post-acute settings, the health system said Tuesday. CEO Ralph W. Muller also appointed Jan Bergen president and chief executive of Lancaster General, known as LG Health.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: My ailing-for-several-years grandmother has just been admitted to the hospital with what sounds like a serious health problem, and I leave on a European trip tomorrow afternoon. Am I a bad grandchild for not even considering a postponement? I saw her a few weeks ago, and she barely seems to know who I am anymore. Answer: This is your conscience! Sorry, I can neither take you off this hook nor put you on it. You want to go to Europe but are afraid others will judge you for it, right?
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
If you read me, you know that I get jazzed about certain products. And then I spread the word, herein. I'd like to do that right now, with a short preface before I get to the point. This, instead of my usual endless preface before I get to the point. Getting to the point isn't all it's cracked up to be. So here we go. First, my favorite product in the world is my books. If you enjoy these Sunday stories, they're all collected in books I write with Daughter Francesca, and you should buy some and read them right away.
NEWS
August 9, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
For all the excitement over high-tech drugs and surgical procedures, clean drinking water is one of the top life-saving health advances of the modern age. Yet billions do not have access to it. According to a June report by the World Health Organization, at least 1.8 billion people still drink water contaminated with feces. Philadelphia was one of the first cities in the U.S. to have a public drinking water supply provided by the government. It was begun in 1801 after a series of yellow fever epidemics killed thousands of people.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
TANIA CIOLKO filmed her question for GOP candidates before the debate Thursday night, but never expected it'd be aired live and answered on national television. "Most people I know want to work," she told the 10 presidential hopefuls. "They don't want handouts. They want the freedom and opportunity to create a living based upon their own talents. " She wanted candidates to name one thing they'd do to promote small-business growth and entrepreneurship, after the nation's economy declined in the previous decade.
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