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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
June 19, 1996 | JIM MacMILLAN/ DAILY NEWS
Members of the Army National Guard 108th Combat Support Hospital set up a traveling combat hospital yesterday, near Memorial Hall in Fairmount Park. The 108th, with the Department of Health, will hold a health fair Friday, Saturday and Sunday, with free mammograms, immunizations, blood tests and physicals. For information, call 215-686-5026.
NEWS
November 30, 2012
ALDOUS HUXLEY once made this chilling observation: "A really efficient totalitarian state would be one in which the all-powerful executive of political bosses and their army of managers control a population of slaves who do not have to be coerced, because they love their servitude. " I thought of this in the days after the election, as the Left and the Right started arguing about what this country will look like in four more years. Those of us who did not vote for Barack Obama fear that the 2.0 version of his administration will permanently move us from a nation of makers to a nation of takers.
FOOD
July 30, 1986 | Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carbohydrates came into their own last week, as gourmet fare at the 32d annual International Fancy Food and Confection Show. Not the usual sugary simple carbohydrates, mind you, but the complex, all- natural, "health-food" kind of carbohydrates: breads, beans, grains and, yes, more pasta. That is not to say that fewer chocolatiers and candy companies were represented in the miles of aisles at the show at the Javits Convention Center. But this is one of the largest trade shows in the country, having grown to 700 exhibitors from 20 countries.
NEWS
January 17, 2016
Precision medicine, such as the immunotherapy innovations Vice President Biden discussed at Penn on Friday, is transforming cancer diagnosis and treatment. Find out how these discoveries are already helping patients, and where their promise lies.
NEWS
March 31, 1996 | For The Inquirer / MICHAEL PLUNKETT
It's often said that laughter is the best medicine. And that appears to have been the case last weekend at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey's School of Osteopathic Medicine in Stratford. The school held a "fun" raiser for benefit of the Ronald McDonald House of Camden County. The health fair/carnival featured clowns, magicians, music, games, raffles and food.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | By Dave Urbanski, Special to The Inquirer
Pitman officials tomorrow will implement the Lipari Information Network (LINK), a federally funded project designed to track the health of residents who lived near the contaminated Lipari Landfill between 1967 and 1984. The 16-acre site off Route 322 near the Mantua-Pitman border closed in 1971 after nearby residents complained of respiratory problems and nausea. It heads the federal Superfund toxic cleanup list. Councilman Douglas Stuart said officials would outline the project's goals and procedures at the news conference set for 2:30 p.m. tomorrow in Pitman Council chambers.
NEWS
March 5, 2013 | By Maria Cheng, Associated Press
LONDON - Despite six decades of free medical care and widespread health campaigns, Britons are among the unhealthiest people in Western Europe, a new study says. International researchers analyzed the country's rates of sickness and death from 1990 to 2010 compared with those of 15 other Western European countries in addition to Australia, Canada, and the United States. Experts described the U.K. results as "startling" and said Britain was failing to address underlying health risks in its population, including rising rates of high blood pressure, obesity, and drug and alcohol abuse.
LIVING
September 28, 1986 | By Jennifer Harper, Special to The Inquirer
Walk into a bookstore in any mall, and you'll find a shelf full of America's most hair-raising volumes: the symptom books. One peek, and the reader is lost in fascinated dread. Osteoporosis, AIDS, Alzheimer's disease. The human body looks dismally vulnerable. It never occurred to the hapless reader that all these things could go wrong. Forget meaningful relationships, money-market funds and the bomb - Americans have a number-one topic: their health. Health information is everywhere, from the earnest eyewitness reporter on the evening news to heavyweight medical articles in general-interest magazines.
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | By Beth Wagner, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Despite exhausting its own funding, the Health Care Cost Containment Council will continue to operate while the Casey administration searches for a survival strategy. Joe Martin, spokesman for the council, said employees would continue to work without the assurance that they would be paid. As of yesterday, the council already had compiled a debt of $33,437 in operating expenses. The council was not allocated any money in the state budget passed last month because the administration planned to transfer the council's functions to the Insurance Department.
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BUSINESS
August 13, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Lancaster General Health, a unit of the University of Pennsylvania Health System, picked King of Prussia's Universal Health Services Inc. to operate a planned 126-bed behavioral-health hospital planned in Lancaster, Pa. The $30 million facility is expected to open two years from now, Lancaster General said. The partnership will have a six-member board of governors, with three members from each partner. Lancaster General will lease the land to the partnership. UHS, which already owns eight behavioral-health facilities in Pennsylvania, will operate the hospital.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
Federal authorities raided a mental health clinic in downtown Camden on Thursday morning and spent hours carrying cardboard boxes out of the building. Authorities would not comment on the investigation into the Nueva Vida Behavioral Health Center of N.J., which is a half-block from City Hall on Market Street. FBI agents were accompanied by representatives from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, as well as an agent from Homeland Security Investigations. Officers from the Camden County police force and representatives of the Camden County Prosecutor's Office also were on the scene.
NEWS
August 10, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Philadelphia has plenty of primary-care providers overall, but there is far less access to care in communities with the highest concentrations of African American residents, according to a new study. While the general findings were not a surprise - highly segregated black (and, to a lesser extent, Hispanic) areas were known to have fewer medical practitioners - the difference was bigger than the researchers had expected. The effect was independent of neighborhood poverty rates, which turned out to be less significant than anticipated, although it is not clear why. The results pointed to the limitations even of sweeping legislation such as President Obama's Affordable Care Act, which led to unprecedented reductions in the number of people without insurance.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Dylan Purcell, STAFF WRITERS
What does it take to lead a union for 4,652 electricians - one the state's most politically powerful? Start with $30 million in campaign contributions spent over the course of 16 years on state and local candidates by the city's electricians' union, Local 98 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. Over the years, the union's money and manpower have helped elect mayors, City Council members, county commissioners, congressmen, state legislators, governors, and at least 58 judges, including the union leader's brother and five Pennsylvania Supreme Court justices.
NEWS
August 8, 2016
Joel Zinberg is a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, a practicing surgeon at Mount Sinai Hospital, and an associate clinical professor of surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine Another day, another health-care co-op failure. In July alone, three co-ops, HealthyCT in Connecticut, Community Care of Oregon, and Land of Lincoln in Illinois, announced they are closing up shop. They join 13 other failed co-ops out of the original 23 that were a centerpiece of the Affordable Care Act's vision for the future of health-care organization - an unrealistic vision based on wishful thinking and sabotaged by the ACA itself.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Health insurers have requested rate changes -- including an increase of up to 32.3 percent -- for individual plans that will be offered this fall on New Jersey's Affordable Care Act marketplace this fall, according to data posted Monday on the federal web site HealthCare.gov. However, 12 of 19 insurance plans, effective Jan. 1, are seeking increases of less than 10 percent. The biggest requested increase was from Oxford Health Insurance Inc., a unit of UnitedHealthcare. Its Oxford NJ EPO (exclusive provider organization)
NEWS
August 2, 2016 | By Sally C. Pipes
  President Obama recently took to the Journal of the American Medical Association to defend his health-care law and recommend additional reforms. Among them? A government-run "public option" designed to compete against insurers on the exchanges. Instead of looking to increase the federal government's role in health care yet again, he should have cribbed from House Speaker Paul Ryan's health-care blueprint, which was released late last month as part of his "A Better Way" reform agenda.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
A Horsham company that provides bedside X-rays and other diagnostic services will move 63 call-center jobs to Clearwater, Fla., in September. About 100 people will remain in the Horsham office of MobilexUSA, Mary Berberich, a sales support supervisor in Horsham, said Friday. The layoff announcement was posted Thursday on the Pennsylvania Department of Labor's web site. The Horsham call center employees have been offered the chance to relocate, and MobilexUSA's human resources department is trying to find jobs for them in other local call centers, Berberich said.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Jefferson Health said Thursday it acquired a controlling stake in Rothman Orthopaedic Specialty Hospital, in Bensalem. The price or was not disclosed. Jefferson previously owned 15 percent of the Bensalem facility. The other partners, as of 2012, were the physician-owned Rothman Institute, with 64 percent ownership; Holy Redeemer Health System, which owned 5 percent; and Nueterra Healthcare, a manager if physician-owned hospitals, owned the rest. The Rothman hospital opened in 2010.
NEWS
July 29, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
Saying their own costs have risen, health insurance companies made their cases to state regulators Wednesday for double-digit rate increases next year for individual policies in Pennsylvania. The requests before the Insurance Department include proposed average rate increases of 17.2 percent for Aetna Health Inc., 25.4 percent to 48.1 percent for Highmark companies, 0.9 percent to 16.2 percent for UPMC companies, and 19.9 percent to 22.5 percent for Independence Blue Cross companies, according to the department.
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