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Health Care

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NEWS
June 2, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Within a few weeks, President Clinton will unveil his proposal for reform of America's health-care system. Millions of words already have been spoken and written on behalf of one plan or another. And as the national debate focuses on the best approach, only brief public mention is given to why such reform is needed. The reasons for health-care reform are so obvious to analysts from Jackson Hole to Foggy Bottom that they tick them off in sound bites. But, to the consternation of these policy wonks, the public is only now paying attention to the "whys.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | By KEN WEINSTEIN
AS THE OWNER of a small business, it's clear to me that the debate over health-care reform has reached a critical moment. Over the summer, a shrill minority monopolized the public stage by playing on people's fears in their attempt to derail much needed change. It's time to take back the debate. The owners of small businesses must sift through the flurry of falsehoods and misstatements to discern the truth. We are sinking under the weight of health-care costs and the cost of not insuring all our employees.
NEWS
March 30, 2010
YOUR editorial "Corbett's Move Could Make Some Sick" makes a mockery of real issues pertaining to federal health-care legislation. You imply that Attorney General Tom Corbett is pandering to the "conservative base of his party. " Yet every single Republican, and many Democrats, voted against the bill, and according to the latest Rasmussen poll, 58 percent of Pennsylvanians opposed the bill. If anything, Corbett is pandering to the center of public opinion. You expressed no similar outrage when President Obama and Gov. Rendell used taxpayer funds on their public-relations blitz touting health-care reform.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | BY MATTHEW H. TAYLOR
Spiraling health costs, millions uninsured and uncertainty of keeping one's health insurance continue to dominate the news and (President) Clinton's view of the health-care system. The administration's proposal merely replaces one bloated bureaucratic mess (the insurance industry) with another over-grown, insensitive system (government managed insurance). Consumers, under either system, cannot exercise much control in determining what services they receive and at what cost. Reform which empowers consumers and weakens the health-care monopolies will stem the increasing costs and improve quality.
NEWS
July 13, 1986
The Health Care Cost Containment Act signed last week by Gov. Thornburgh is a worthy first step, but certainly no panacea, in bringing health-care delivery costs under control in Pennsylvania and defining more precisely who is in need of state assistance. Resulting from more than a year of work by business, labor, legislators, the Thornburgh administration, the health-insurance industry and health-care providers, the act creates a Health Care Cost Containment Council. Its 21 members will include the state secretaries of health and public welfare and the state insurance commissioner.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
A woman in western Pennsylvania tells her political commentator husband that if there's a single issue that will win her vote, it's health care. A man in central Pennsylvania writes his local newspaper, saying national health insurance is "the same old song" and wonders who pays, "the tooth fairy?" So it goes. National health insurance has become a hot issue in the U.S. Senate race between Sen. Harris Wofford and challenger Dick Thornburgh. Some call it a "pushbutton" issue.
NEWS
March 2, 1992 | BY JOHN P. COLMENARES
Medicine is "the science and art dealing with the management and cure of disease. " Disease, not health, is the focus of modern medicine. Our current medical system is a system organized against disease, not for health. In the United States we have an extremely sophisticated, well-structured medical care system - but no coherent, well-defined policy directed toward the health and welfare population. We share this dubious distinction with one other industrialized nation - South Africa.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
A tug-of-war over who is going to pay the ever-increasing bill for employee health-care benefits is expected to be the workplace issue of the '90s. Employers claim they can no longer afford to bear the burden alone, while a recent study by Metropolitan Life Insurance reported that more than half the country's labor leaders consider preserving health benefits more important than pay scales in coming negotiations. And most major industrial disputes last year turned, at least partly, on health care costs.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By T.J. McCarthy, Special to The Inquirer
S.A.M. Crawford, director of Kennedy Memorial Hospitals' new Gerontology Center in Stratford, found it easy to explain why the atmosphere at Friday's ribbon-cutting ceremony lived up to the advance billing. The hospital had touted the opening of the center as "a community event for all to celebrate. " "A lot of the people you see here are health-care and community workers who work with the elderly," Crawford said. "What this means to them is that the system is reaching out to them and saying, 'You've worked with the elderly and so have we: Now, let's do it together.
NEWS
September 18, 2009
"IT WAS a Wednesday evening, Sept. 2 in the City of Brotherly Love, where a candlelight vigil and health-care reform rally took place to honor the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's lifelong work in health-care needs and so much more. The event was at Love Park, where I told the crowd . . . " In memory of the great Sen. Teddy Kennedy, the Lion of the Senate who fought hard for the working man, union man and common man! We remember when he said the torch of the future was passed to Barack Obama during the presidential campaign.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 4, 2014
THIS WEEK, the state launched enrollment for its new Medicaid program that provides health care for low-income people. Before lamenting the downsides of "Healthy PA," we must applaud the fact that 600,000 Pennsylvanians who had fallen through bureaucratic cracks last year under the Affordable Care Act will now be able to have health-care coverage. The newly eligible are primarily poor working adults, like home health-care workers, waitresses, construction workers and others who are raising families on low incomes and can't get coverage through their employer.
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Toll-free phone lines were jammed, and low-income workers streamed into sign-up sites as enrollment opened Monday for expanded health insurance coverage under Medicaid. An estimated 600,000 people - most working at low-wage jobs - are eligible for Medicaid through Healthy PA, the state's alternative to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. First-day enrollment numbers were unavailable, Kait Gillis, a spokeswoman for the Department of Human Services, said at the end of the day. Even late in the day, callers to the state's toll-free line were told to call back later because of the high volume of calls.
REAL_ESTATE
December 1, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
When you ask residential developers in Philadelphia who their target audience is, the typical response is "eds and meds," meaning those who work in education and health care. Both seem impervious to the economic stresses and strains that affect other business sectors, so developers who focus on building for-sale and rental units near medical centers and universities are not taking great risks. Health care is the fastest growing because America is aging rapidly and demand for services is increasing.
NEWS
November 30, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
It took Holly Phares 27 days and 20 hours to enroll in health insurance during 2013's disastrous rollout of the Affordable Care Act website. She doesn't expect a repeat of her slog through last year's cyber hell. But the choral director for Tabernacle United Church in West Philadelphia will be shopping the marketplace for a better deal rather than simply reenrolling in her Independence Blue Cross platinum PPO. "They say there are twice as many choices" in the marketplace, says Phares, 51. "I'm just not going to stick with Blue Cross.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rita Hodge Sellers, 84, a longtime nurse, health administrator and educator, died Wednesday, Nov. 5, at Normandy Farms Estates retirement center in Blue Bell. Mrs. Sellers was known by family and friends as a strong mentor who was passionate about helping others, recalled her daughter, Suzanne Rita Sellers. She described her mother as someone who worked to keep herself healthy and whose favorite hobby was traveling. "She visited Rome, China, and Africa," said Suzanne Sellers. "I still remember when she and my dad took me to Paris as a graduation present when I was in college.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - The state Department of Public Welfare chief said Monday that her agency was prepared for an onslaught when enrollment for "Healthy PA," Pennsylvania's Medicaid expansion alternative, begins in less than two weeks. The website dedicated to enrolling hundreds of thousands of uninsured low-income Pennsylvanians under the Affordable Care Act is seeing a spike in users following the launch of a $2 million statewide ad blitz. The state anticipates that about 600,000 people - many of them the working poor - are eligible to get coverage beginning Jan. 1 under the Corbett administration's proposal, which uses Medicaid funding to pay private insurers.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Abington Health in Montgomery County and Center City's Jefferson Health System have taken a step closer to a merger by signing a letter of intent to work toward a final agreement, the two organizations said Wednesday. The proposed deal, which could be completed next year, comes just months after Jefferson split amicably from its former longtime partner, the highly profitable Main Line Health system. Stephen Klasko, Jefferson's president and chief executive, said the structure of the proposed merger with Abington would allow him to achieve something that was not possible with Main Line Health.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
CALL IT a leap of faith or call it a risky move. The Philadelphia School District announced yesterday that it would distribute $15 million to schools on Monday from projected health-care savings with the teachers union, despite an injunction temporarily blocking the changes. Common Pleas Judge Nina Wright Padilla last week ruled in favor of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers' request to stay all changes to their health-care benefits. The district and the School Reform Commission said they would appeal the decision.
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - A trio of Trump Taj Mahal waitresses - Susan Blight, Patti Pinchock, and Valerie McMorris - have been with the casino since it opened on April 2, 1990. All three said Friday they sense its last days are on the near horizon. "We just feel violated," said Pinchock, 53, of Egg Harbor Township, who held up a sign that read, "Healthcare RIP. " Added McMorris, 45, of Galloway Township: "A Delaware judge, with a stroke of a pen, took away our health-care benefits. Instead of being part of the middle class, we are now the working poor.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | BY ADAM SCHICKEDANZ & NEAL HALFON
PARENTHOOD should be affordable in this country, but the cost of raising a child from birth to adulthood is now a quarter of a million dollars and projected to double by the time today's toddlers reach their teens. Will having kids soon be out of reach economically for many American families? A recent report from the Center for American Progress found that middle-class families are feeling an unprecedented economic squeeze - caught between stagnating wages and the exploding cost of basics like housing, health care and children's education.
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