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NEWS
June 2, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Within a few weeks, President Clinton will unveil his proposal for reform of America's health-care system. Millions of words already have been spoken and written on behalf of one plan or another. And as the national debate focuses on the best approach, only brief public mention is given to why such reform is needed. The reasons for health-care reform are so obvious to analysts from Jackson Hole to Foggy Bottom that they tick them off in sound bites. But, to the consternation of these policy wonks, the public is only now paying attention to the "whys.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | By KEN WEINSTEIN
AS THE OWNER of a small business, it's clear to me that the debate over health-care reform has reached a critical moment. Over the summer, a shrill minority monopolized the public stage by playing on people's fears in their attempt to derail much needed change. It's time to take back the debate. The owners of small businesses must sift through the flurry of falsehoods and misstatements to discern the truth. We are sinking under the weight of health-care costs and the cost of not insuring all our employees.
NEWS
March 30, 2010
YOUR editorial "Corbett's Move Could Make Some Sick" makes a mockery of real issues pertaining to federal health-care legislation. You imply that Attorney General Tom Corbett is pandering to the "conservative base of his party. " Yet every single Republican, and many Democrats, voted against the bill, and according to the latest Rasmussen poll, 58 percent of Pennsylvanians opposed the bill. If anything, Corbett is pandering to the center of public opinion. You expressed no similar outrage when President Obama and Gov. Rendell used taxpayer funds on their public-relations blitz touting health-care reform.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | BY MATTHEW H. TAYLOR
Spiraling health costs, millions uninsured and uncertainty of keeping one's health insurance continue to dominate the news and (President) Clinton's view of the health-care system. The administration's proposal merely replaces one bloated bureaucratic mess (the insurance industry) with another over-grown, insensitive system (government managed insurance). Consumers, under either system, cannot exercise much control in determining what services they receive and at what cost. Reform which empowers consumers and weakens the health-care monopolies will stem the increasing costs and improve quality.
NEWS
July 13, 1986
The Health Care Cost Containment Act signed last week by Gov. Thornburgh is a worthy first step, but certainly no panacea, in bringing health-care delivery costs under control in Pennsylvania and defining more precisely who is in need of state assistance. Resulting from more than a year of work by business, labor, legislators, the Thornburgh administration, the health-insurance industry and health-care providers, the act creates a Health Care Cost Containment Council. Its 21 members will include the state secretaries of health and public welfare and the state insurance commissioner.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
A woman in western Pennsylvania tells her political commentator husband that if there's a single issue that will win her vote, it's health care. A man in central Pennsylvania writes his local newspaper, saying national health insurance is "the same old song" and wonders who pays, "the tooth fairy?" So it goes. National health insurance has become a hot issue in the U.S. Senate race between Sen. Harris Wofford and challenger Dick Thornburgh. Some call it a "pushbutton" issue.
NEWS
March 2, 1992 | BY JOHN P. COLMENARES
Medicine is "the science and art dealing with the management and cure of disease. " Disease, not health, is the focus of modern medicine. Our current medical system is a system organized against disease, not for health. In the United States we have an extremely sophisticated, well-structured medical care system - but no coherent, well-defined policy directed toward the health and welfare population. We share this dubious distinction with one other industrialized nation - South Africa.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
A tug-of-war over who is going to pay the ever-increasing bill for employee health-care benefits is expected to be the workplace issue of the '90s. Employers claim they can no longer afford to bear the burden alone, while a recent study by Metropolitan Life Insurance reported that more than half the country's labor leaders consider preserving health benefits more important than pay scales in coming negotiations. And most major industrial disputes last year turned, at least partly, on health care costs.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By T.J. McCarthy, Special to The Inquirer
S.A.M. Crawford, director of Kennedy Memorial Hospitals' new Gerontology Center in Stratford, found it easy to explain why the atmosphere at Friday's ribbon-cutting ceremony lived up to the advance billing. The hospital had touted the opening of the center as "a community event for all to celebrate. " "A lot of the people you see here are health-care and community workers who work with the elderly," Crawford said. "What this means to them is that the system is reaching out to them and saying, 'You've worked with the elderly and so have we: Now, let's do it together.
NEWS
September 18, 2009
"IT WAS a Wednesday evening, Sept. 2 in the City of Brotherly Love, where a candlelight vigil and health-care reform rally took place to honor the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's lifelong work in health-care needs and so much more. The event was at Love Park, where I told the crowd . . . " In memory of the great Sen. Teddy Kennedy, the Lion of the Senate who fought hard for the working man, union man and common man! We remember when he said the torch of the future was passed to Barack Obama during the presidential campaign.
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BUSINESS
July 15, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
This story has been updated. The Philadelphia region's largest health-care employer may be extending its reach farther into New Jersey. The University of Pennsylvania Health System, better known as Penn Medicine, announced Wednesday that it had signed a letter of intent to partner with Princeton HealthCare System. In a statement, Penn Medicine CEO Ralph Muller said the partnership would give central New Jersey residents access to Penn's world-class patient-care programs.
NEWS
July 12, 2016 | By Andy Carter
  We are hearing quite a bit about the transformation of health care, but what does that really mean? If you are Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, it is the complete repeal of the Affordable Care Act. If you are the Democratic front-runner, Hillary Clinton, it is modifying the existing platform. Regardless of the interpretation, we are a long way from implementation of any significant policy shifts. We simply shouldn't delay tackling the challenges right in front of us while the presidential campaign drags on and a new administration sets up shop.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Cindy Schmeltz, medical director of La Comunidad Hispana, recalled the day a homeless woman with diabetes walked into the Kennett Square agency, desperate for help. "She was sleeping on somebody's floor. She was out of insulin, so her diabetes was out of control," Schmeltz said. The woman also was depressed, not only over her chronic illness but also the transience of her life. At that moment, Schmeltz said, she realized that "it didn't matter that I was giving her insulin if she didn't have anywhere to store it, if she didn't have food in her belly, if she didn't know where to sleep that night.
NEWS
July 8, 2016
By Joe Pitts Americans who once believed that Obamacare would deliver are long past being disillusioned. President Obama promised people lower premiums and deductibles and the ability to keep their current health plans if they liked them; the opposite happened. Under Obamacare, Americans received higher premiums and deductibles and encountered insurers that dropped their plans. Americans are understandably wary of another "solution. " Late last month, Speaker Paul Ryan (R., Wis.)
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Marcus Price
  As a baggage handler at Philadelphia International Airport, I've been on strike to fight for a better airport and against illegal bullying. But going on strike is a last resort. It is a major burden to go without pay and face possible retribution from our employers. Some unions have vowed not to strike during the Democratic National Convention. I respect their choice and support them. They have collective bargaining agreements that allow them to make a living wage and enjoy fair schedules, health care, and retirement benefits.
NEWS
July 7, 2016
THE FORECAST for education in Pennsylvania is never sunny, but lately a number of troubling storm systems have appeared on the horizon. And, as usual, Philadelphia is set to bear the brunt. Last month, for example, a survey by the Pennsylvania Association of School Administrators and Pennsylvania Association of School Business Officials found that 60 percent of the state's school districts plan to raise property taxes. These hikes reflect increasing costs in education, particularly pensions and health care, as well as costs for special education, health care and charter school contributions, all of which represent $600 million in new costs.
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Daniel Block, STAFF WRITER
A Chester County Court jury began deliberations Wednesday in the trial of Edward O'Brien, accused of withholding necessary medical care from his 92-year-old father who died in 2013. At 9 p.m. the jurors in the third-degree murder case recessed and were to resume deliberations on Thursday morning. In closing arguments Wednesday, prosecutors argued that the care that O'Brien's father- also named Edward O'Brien- received from his son was so negligent that it constituted murder.
NEWS
June 29, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
The University of the Sciences on Monday named the founding dean of Camden's Cooper Medical School of Rowan University as its 25th president. Paul Katz, 68, a physician who specializes in rheumatology and has spent more than 40 years in health care and higher education, will take over at the West Philadelphia university on Sept. 1. He replaces Kathleen R. Mayes, interim leader since Helen F. Giles-Gee resigned in December 2014, 21/2 years into her presidency. "I have enormous respect for Paul," said Marvin Samson, the school's board chairman.
NEWS
June 29, 2016
ISSUE | MENTAL HEALTH New N.J. system will jeopardize care Community-based mental-health and substance-use services enable people to lead healthy, productive lives; reduce emergency-room visits and hospitalizations; and prevent imprisonment and homelessness. Access to quality services is the morally right, fiscally responsible goal. Many such programs in New Jersey face downsizing or closure because a proposed transition in state reimbursement rates will leave them far short of the cost of care.
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