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NEWS
June 2, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Within a few weeks, President Clinton will unveil his proposal for reform of America's health-care system. Millions of words already have been spoken and written on behalf of one plan or another. And as the national debate focuses on the best approach, only brief public mention is given to why such reform is needed. The reasons for health-care reform are so obvious to analysts from Jackson Hole to Foggy Bottom that they tick them off in sound bites. But, to the consternation of these policy wonks, the public is only now paying attention to the "whys.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | By KEN WEINSTEIN
AS THE OWNER of a small business, it's clear to me that the debate over health-care reform has reached a critical moment. Over the summer, a shrill minority monopolized the public stage by playing on people's fears in their attempt to derail much needed change. It's time to take back the debate. The owners of small businesses must sift through the flurry of falsehoods and misstatements to discern the truth. We are sinking under the weight of health-care costs and the cost of not insuring all our employees.
NEWS
March 30, 2010
YOUR editorial "Corbett's Move Could Make Some Sick" makes a mockery of real issues pertaining to federal health-care legislation. You imply that Attorney General Tom Corbett is pandering to the "conservative base of his party. " Yet every single Republican, and many Democrats, voted against the bill, and according to the latest Rasmussen poll, 58 percent of Pennsylvanians opposed the bill. If anything, Corbett is pandering to the center of public opinion. You expressed no similar outrage when President Obama and Gov. Rendell used taxpayer funds on their public-relations blitz touting health-care reform.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | BY MATTHEW H. TAYLOR
Spiraling health costs, millions uninsured and uncertainty of keeping one's health insurance continue to dominate the news and (President) Clinton's view of the health-care system. The administration's proposal merely replaces one bloated bureaucratic mess (the insurance industry) with another over-grown, insensitive system (government managed insurance). Consumers, under either system, cannot exercise much control in determining what services they receive and at what cost. Reform which empowers consumers and weakens the health-care monopolies will stem the increasing costs and improve quality.
NEWS
July 13, 1986
The Health Care Cost Containment Act signed last week by Gov. Thornburgh is a worthy first step, but certainly no panacea, in bringing health-care delivery costs under control in Pennsylvania and defining more precisely who is in need of state assistance. Resulting from more than a year of work by business, labor, legislators, the Thornburgh administration, the health-insurance industry and health-care providers, the act creates a Health Care Cost Containment Council. Its 21 members will include the state secretaries of health and public welfare and the state insurance commissioner.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
A woman in western Pennsylvania tells her political commentator husband that if there's a single issue that will win her vote, it's health care. A man in central Pennsylvania writes his local newspaper, saying national health insurance is "the same old song" and wonders who pays, "the tooth fairy?" So it goes. National health insurance has become a hot issue in the U.S. Senate race between Sen. Harris Wofford and challenger Dick Thornburgh. Some call it a "pushbutton" issue.
NEWS
March 2, 1992 | BY JOHN P. COLMENARES
Medicine is "the science and art dealing with the management and cure of disease. " Disease, not health, is the focus of modern medicine. Our current medical system is a system organized against disease, not for health. In the United States we have an extremely sophisticated, well-structured medical care system - but no coherent, well-defined policy directed toward the health and welfare population. We share this dubious distinction with one other industrialized nation - South Africa.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
A tug-of-war over who is going to pay the ever-increasing bill for employee health-care benefits is expected to be the workplace issue of the '90s. Employers claim they can no longer afford to bear the burden alone, while a recent study by Metropolitan Life Insurance reported that more than half the country's labor leaders consider preserving health benefits more important than pay scales in coming negotiations. And most major industrial disputes last year turned, at least partly, on health care costs.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By T.J. McCarthy, Special to The Inquirer
S.A.M. Crawford, director of Kennedy Memorial Hospitals' new Gerontology Center in Stratford, found it easy to explain why the atmosphere at Friday's ribbon-cutting ceremony lived up to the advance billing. The hospital had touted the opening of the center as "a community event for all to celebrate. " "A lot of the people you see here are health-care and community workers who work with the elderly," Crawford said. "What this means to them is that the system is reaching out to them and saying, 'You've worked with the elderly and so have we: Now, let's do it together.
NEWS
September 18, 2009
"IT WAS a Wednesday evening, Sept. 2 in the City of Brotherly Love, where a candlelight vigil and health-care reform rally took place to honor the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's lifelong work in health-care needs and so much more. The event was at Love Park, where I told the crowd . . . " In memory of the great Sen. Teddy Kennedy, the Lion of the Senate who fought hard for the working man, union man and common man! We remember when he said the torch of the future was passed to Barack Obama during the presidential campaign.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 28, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT'S INTERESTING how little things can stick in your memory. Like Jim McLaughlin's No. 44. It was the number he wore when he played wide receiver on the football team of St. Francis of Assisi Parochial School in Springfield, Delaware County, back in the '50s. "It was a number he always remembered," his family said. Which might seem curious, because Jim McLaughlin went on to more athletic achievements, success in business and many charitable activities. But, apparently, in his mind he would always be No. 44. James J. McLaughlin Jr., a health-care marketer, founder of a health-care consulting business, an active alumnus of St. Joseph's University, an Air Force veteran and a devoted family man, died Friday at age 67 after a courageous battle with brain cancer.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care has leased 23,000 square feet at a Cherry Hill office park owned by an affiliate of Bala Cywnyd-based Endurance Real Estate. UBHC will operate an outpatient hospital at Colwyck Property's office park at 57 Haddonfield Rd., Markeim Chalmers vice president Scott Martin, who served as the health-care provider's broker, said Wednesday. UBHC's lease at the office park, in space previously occupied by the Internal Revenue Service, is worth $2.5 million over its initial five-year term, Martin said.
NEWS
July 16, 2015
ISSUE | CAMPAIGNS Limit influence As a candidate to represent Bucks County's Eighth Congressional District, I applaud and agree with your editorial on campaign-finance secrecy ("Money talks in politics," July 12). During the announcement of my candidacy, I pledged to be a voice of leadership in restoring a semblance of sanity to campaign financing by limiting the amount of money spent on any campaign to the equivalent of twice the salary if elected, and to accept no money from any political committee outside the district.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, For The Inquirer
DreamIt Health Philadelphia - a boot camp for health start-ups - celebrated its third year Monday, saying that 21 firms had gone through the program and that 10 more were poised to participate. Powered by a collaboration among DreamIt Ventures, Independence Blue Cross, and Penn Medicine, the 16-week program's goal is to provide the support that takes a health-care idea to market. "We wanted to reach out into the entrepreneurial world and find passionate innovators who can help us reimagine health care," said Tom Olenzak, director of innovation for IBC. "We're trying to figure out what the future of health care looks like.
NEWS
July 9, 2015
ISSUE | HEALTH School centers reinvent wheel Outsourcing will not provide 90 percent of what school nurses provide, and school-based health centers will not fill the gap ("Schools can be health centers," July 5). According to the American Academy of Pediatrics and various other experts, including the federal Head Start program's performance standards, every child should have a "medical home" in the community. We do not need another layer of care between the child and his medical-home health provider.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Customs conversation is often the same for Kemal Malik, who carries a United Kingdom passport as a top executive for the German-based global giant Bayer AG. The agent will ask Malik what company he works for. Malik: "Bayer. " Agent: "Oh, the aspirin company. " "That's what we are known for, and that's great," Malik said in Philadelphia recently at the American Association for Cancer Research meeting. "But we want to be known for other stuff and we have that opportunity.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Newspaper Guild of Greater Philadelphia's tentative agreement with the owners of The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com calls for no increase in health-care costs and the end of unpaid furloughs for Guild members, the union said. In an e-mail to its members Monday morning, the Guild announced that it had negotiated a two-year deal with Philadelphia Media Network that also included no changes to the health-care plan for at least the first year of the contract.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Democrats celebrated. Republicans fumed. And while some promised to continue fighting to kill President Obama's signature health law after Thursday's defeat at the Supreme Court, others in the GOP said it was time to try other tactics, at least until they can take back the White House. "As long as there's a president named Obama, the health-care law will not be repealed," said Rep. Charlie Dent (R., Pa.). "We're going to have to deal with the law as it is, and try to make changes wherever and however we can. " Democrats, by contrast, gleefully celebrated a win that protects Obama's Affordable Care Act. Rep. Chaka Fattah (D., Pa.)
NEWS
June 26, 2015
POPE FRANCIS hasn't even arrived, but already yesterday brought two miracles. Both are court rulings, and both will ensure millions of Pennsylvanians will be able to lead healthier lives. First, the state Commonwealth Court struck down Act 192 that would have allowed the National Rifle Association to sue Pennsylvania cities that enact local gun laws, and demand taxpayers pay their legal fees. The law was an affront to big cities like ours that are fighting against gun violence. The court's decision dealt a rare defeat for the NRA, a miracle for which we have two words: Praise Jesus.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Butler takes home $250 a week for driving a school bus with blind children to a Catholic day school part time. Her health insurance premiums are $517 a month. She pays 76 cents, and Washington picks up the rest. The Supreme Court is expected to rule within a week on whether that subsidy, a key part of President Obama's health-care law, is legal in 34 states. If it decides not, then the West Philadelphia resident's premiums would swell to half her income. "Fortunately for me, I'm pretty healthy," Butler said.
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