CollectionsHealth Care
IN THE NEWS

Health Care

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 2, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Within a few weeks, President Clinton will unveil his proposal for reform of America's health-care system. Millions of words already have been spoken and written on behalf of one plan or another. And as the national debate focuses on the best approach, only brief public mention is given to why such reform is needed. The reasons for health-care reform are so obvious to analysts from Jackson Hole to Foggy Bottom that they tick them off in sound bites. But, to the consternation of these policy wonks, the public is only now paying attention to the "whys.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | By KEN WEINSTEIN
AS THE OWNER of a small business, it's clear to me that the debate over health-care reform has reached a critical moment. Over the summer, a shrill minority monopolized the public stage by playing on people's fears in their attempt to derail much needed change. It's time to take back the debate. The owners of small businesses must sift through the flurry of falsehoods and misstatements to discern the truth. We are sinking under the weight of health-care costs and the cost of not insuring all our employees.
NEWS
March 30, 2010
YOUR editorial "Corbett's Move Could Make Some Sick" makes a mockery of real issues pertaining to federal health-care legislation. You imply that Attorney General Tom Corbett is pandering to the "conservative base of his party. " Yet every single Republican, and many Democrats, voted against the bill, and according to the latest Rasmussen poll, 58 percent of Pennsylvanians opposed the bill. If anything, Corbett is pandering to the center of public opinion. You expressed no similar outrage when President Obama and Gov. Rendell used taxpayer funds on their public-relations blitz touting health-care reform.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | BY MATTHEW H. TAYLOR
Spiraling health costs, millions uninsured and uncertainty of keeping one's health insurance continue to dominate the news and (President) Clinton's view of the health-care system. The administration's proposal merely replaces one bloated bureaucratic mess (the insurance industry) with another over-grown, insensitive system (government managed insurance). Consumers, under either system, cannot exercise much control in determining what services they receive and at what cost. Reform which empowers consumers and weakens the health-care monopolies will stem the increasing costs and improve quality.
NEWS
July 13, 1986
The Health Care Cost Containment Act signed last week by Gov. Thornburgh is a worthy first step, but certainly no panacea, in bringing health-care delivery costs under control in Pennsylvania and defining more precisely who is in need of state assistance. Resulting from more than a year of work by business, labor, legislators, the Thornburgh administration, the health-insurance industry and health-care providers, the act creates a Health Care Cost Containment Council. Its 21 members will include the state secretaries of health and public welfare and the state insurance commissioner.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
A woman in western Pennsylvania tells her political commentator husband that if there's a single issue that will win her vote, it's health care. A man in central Pennsylvania writes his local newspaper, saying national health insurance is "the same old song" and wonders who pays, "the tooth fairy?" So it goes. National health insurance has become a hot issue in the U.S. Senate race between Sen. Harris Wofford and challenger Dick Thornburgh. Some call it a "pushbutton" issue.
NEWS
March 2, 1992 | BY JOHN P. COLMENARES
Medicine is "the science and art dealing with the management and cure of disease. " Disease, not health, is the focus of modern medicine. Our current medical system is a system organized against disease, not for health. In the United States we have an extremely sophisticated, well-structured medical care system - but no coherent, well-defined policy directed toward the health and welfare population. We share this dubious distinction with one other industrialized nation - South Africa.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
A tug-of-war over who is going to pay the ever-increasing bill for employee health-care benefits is expected to be the workplace issue of the '90s. Employers claim they can no longer afford to bear the burden alone, while a recent study by Metropolitan Life Insurance reported that more than half the country's labor leaders consider preserving health benefits more important than pay scales in coming negotiations. And most major industrial disputes last year turned, at least partly, on health care costs.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By T.J. McCarthy, Special to The Inquirer
S.A.M. Crawford, director of Kennedy Memorial Hospitals' new Gerontology Center in Stratford, found it easy to explain why the atmosphere at Friday's ribbon-cutting ceremony lived up to the advance billing. The hospital had touted the opening of the center as "a community event for all to celebrate. " "A lot of the people you see here are health-care and community workers who work with the elderly," Crawford said. "What this means to them is that the system is reaching out to them and saying, 'You've worked with the elderly and so have we: Now, let's do it together.
NEWS
September 18, 2009
"IT WAS a Wednesday evening, Sept. 2 in the City of Brotherly Love, where a candlelight vigil and health-care reform rally took place to honor the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's lifelong work in health-care needs and so much more. The event was at Love Park, where I told the crowd . . . " In memory of the great Sen. Teddy Kennedy, the Lion of the Senate who fought hard for the working man, union man and common man! We remember when he said the torch of the future was passed to Barack Obama during the presidential campaign.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 28, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware Valley ACO, a group of five health systems and 450 primary care doctors that is participating in Medicare's new accountable care organization payment model, got good news recently. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), which operates Medicare, announced late Tuesday that it is giving the local group a $6.6 million reward for lowering costs last year. This puts DVACO, the largest such group in the region, near the top of its class. Only 19 percent of accountable care organizations that entered the market in 2014 received rewards or "shared savings" payments.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAPE MAY COURT HOUSE - Luke Feltmann, 7, was having a good week. There the Bergen County boy was, staying at a rental house in Avalon with his extended family, playing with his cousins, splashing in the pool and surf. On top of all that, he cashed in big time with the Tooth Fairy - seven bucks. But then he fell into the dreaded Owie Zone: He awoke in the middle of the night with an earache, a long way from his home doctor. What to do? His mother, Laurie, got on Google. The next morning, Luke and his parents were at Cape Regional Urgent Care in Cape May Court House, being seen by a friendly doctor even though Luke still looked miserable.
NEWS
August 13, 2015
WHEN CONGRESS comes back to session from its August recess, members are expected to deliberate on a bill that would strip Medicare and Medicaid of provisions covering prostate- and colon-cancer screening, Viagra prescriptions and vasectomies. This follows word this week that the FDA is working on regulations that would put condoms behind locked cases, requiring a prescription from a doctor or a parental permission slip. Vasectomies would be subject to greater scrutiny in general health coverage plans, as well, and a new series of conditions will be imposed on those men wishing to get them.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under chief executive Steve Collis, AmerisourceBergen has tried to broaden its business beyond that of an anonymous but huge pharmaceutical wholesaler. That manifested itself in a $250,000 donation to build a pharmacy that opens Saturday at Project HOME's Stephen Klein Wellness Center in North Philadelphia. Project HOME's mission is to break the cycle of poverty afflicting many people in the city, and affordable health care is one element of that. "Our new pharmacy, made possible through the AmerisourceBergen Foundation, is key in our effort to provide quality health care and wellness for the second-poorest zip code in Philadelphia," Sister Mary Scullion, executive director of Project HOME, said in a statement.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
There were plenty of attacks on Hillary Rodham Clinton and President Obama in Thursday's early GOP presidential debate, featuring the seven candidates who didn't qualify for the 9 p.m. prime-time event in Cleveland. But perhaps the more revealing moments in the hour-long event, referred to by some as the "happy hour" debate, came when second-tier candidates took shots at 2016 rivals who are performing better in the polls, such as Donald Trump and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush. Carly Fiorina, former chief executive of Hewlett-Packard, said Trump had tapped into Americans' frustration with "politics as usual.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
TANIA CIOLKO filmed her question for GOP candidates before the debate Thursday night, but never expected it'd be aired live and answered on national television. "Most people I know want to work," she told the 10 presidential hopefuls. "They don't want handouts. They want the freedom and opportunity to create a living based upon their own talents. " She wanted candidates to name one thing they'd do to promote small-business growth and entrepreneurship, after the nation's economy declined in the previous decade.
NEWS
August 5, 2015
AS FAITH LEADERS from across Pennsylvania, we are proud to publicly support Planned Parenthood and the essential care they provide. As providers of pastoral service in our houses of worship and faith communities, we trust Planned Parenthood to offer quality reproductive health care and educational programming, and we know that their mission and work is consistent with the teachings of our various faiths. This is just the latest political attack on women's health - and a clear cynical and coordinated effort designed to undermine this essential health-care provider.
NEWS
July 28, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT'S INTERESTING how little things can stick in your memory. Like Jim McLaughlin's No. 44. It was the number he wore when he played wide receiver on the football team of St. Francis of Assisi Parochial School in Springfield, Delaware County, back in the '50s. "It was a number he always remembered," his family said. Which might seem curious, because Jim McLaughlin went on to more athletic achievements, success in business and many charitable activities. But, apparently, in his mind he would always be No. 44. James J. McLaughlin Jr., a health-care marketer, founder of a health-care consulting business, an active alumnus of St. Joseph's University, an Air Force veteran and a devoted family man, died Friday at age 67 after a courageous battle with brain cancer.
NEWS
July 24, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care has leased 23,000 square feet at a Cherry Hill office park owned by an affiliate of Bala Cywnyd-based Endurance Real Estate. UBHC will operate an outpatient hospital at Colwyck Property's office park at 57 Haddonfield Rd., Markeim Chalmers vice president Scott Martin, who served as the health-care provider's broker, said Wednesday. UBHC's lease at the office park, in space previously occupied by the Internal Revenue Service, is worth $2.5 million over its initial five-year term, Martin said.
NEWS
July 16, 2015
ISSUE | CAMPAIGNS Limit influence As a candidate to represent Bucks County's Eighth Congressional District, I applaud and agree with your editorial on campaign-finance secrecy ("Money talks in politics," July 12). During the announcement of my candidacy, I pledged to be a voice of leadership in restoring a semblance of sanity to campaign financing by limiting the amount of money spent on any campaign to the equivalent of twice the salary if elected, and to accept no money from any political committee outside the district.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|