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NEWS
June 2, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Within a few weeks, President Clinton will unveil his proposal for reform of America's health-care system. Millions of words already have been spoken and written on behalf of one plan or another. And as the national debate focuses on the best approach, only brief public mention is given to why such reform is needed. The reasons for health-care reform are so obvious to analysts from Jackson Hole to Foggy Bottom that they tick them off in sound bites. But, to the consternation of these policy wonks, the public is only now paying attention to the "whys.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | By KEN WEINSTEIN
AS THE OWNER of a small business, it's clear to me that the debate over health-care reform has reached a critical moment. Over the summer, a shrill minority monopolized the public stage by playing on people's fears in their attempt to derail much needed change. It's time to take back the debate. The owners of small businesses must sift through the flurry of falsehoods and misstatements to discern the truth. We are sinking under the weight of health-care costs and the cost of not insuring all our employees.
NEWS
March 30, 2010
YOUR editorial "Corbett's Move Could Make Some Sick" makes a mockery of real issues pertaining to federal health-care legislation. You imply that Attorney General Tom Corbett is pandering to the "conservative base of his party. " Yet every single Republican, and many Democrats, voted against the bill, and according to the latest Rasmussen poll, 58 percent of Pennsylvanians opposed the bill. If anything, Corbett is pandering to the center of public opinion. You expressed no similar outrage when President Obama and Gov. Rendell used taxpayer funds on their public-relations blitz touting health-care reform.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | BY MATTHEW H. TAYLOR
Spiraling health costs, millions uninsured and uncertainty of keeping one's health insurance continue to dominate the news and (President) Clinton's view of the health-care system. The administration's proposal merely replaces one bloated bureaucratic mess (the insurance industry) with another over-grown, insensitive system (government managed insurance). Consumers, under either system, cannot exercise much control in determining what services they receive and at what cost. Reform which empowers consumers and weakens the health-care monopolies will stem the increasing costs and improve quality.
NEWS
July 13, 1986
The Health Care Cost Containment Act signed last week by Gov. Thornburgh is a worthy first step, but certainly no panacea, in bringing health-care delivery costs under control in Pennsylvania and defining more precisely who is in need of state assistance. Resulting from more than a year of work by business, labor, legislators, the Thornburgh administration, the health-insurance industry and health-care providers, the act creates a Health Care Cost Containment Council. Its 21 members will include the state secretaries of health and public welfare and the state insurance commissioner.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
A woman in western Pennsylvania tells her political commentator husband that if there's a single issue that will win her vote, it's health care. A man in central Pennsylvania writes his local newspaper, saying national health insurance is "the same old song" and wonders who pays, "the tooth fairy?" So it goes. National health insurance has become a hot issue in the U.S. Senate race between Sen. Harris Wofford and challenger Dick Thornburgh. Some call it a "pushbutton" issue.
NEWS
March 2, 1992 | BY JOHN P. COLMENARES
Medicine is "the science and art dealing with the management and cure of disease. " Disease, not health, is the focus of modern medicine. Our current medical system is a system organized against disease, not for health. In the United States we have an extremely sophisticated, well-structured medical care system - but no coherent, well-defined policy directed toward the health and welfare population. We share this dubious distinction with one other industrialized nation - South Africa.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
A tug-of-war over who is going to pay the ever-increasing bill for employee health-care benefits is expected to be the workplace issue of the '90s. Employers claim they can no longer afford to bear the burden alone, while a recent study by Metropolitan Life Insurance reported that more than half the country's labor leaders consider preserving health benefits more important than pay scales in coming negotiations. And most major industrial disputes last year turned, at least partly, on health care costs.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By T.J. McCarthy, Special to The Inquirer
S.A.M. Crawford, director of Kennedy Memorial Hospitals' new Gerontology Center in Stratford, found it easy to explain why the atmosphere at Friday's ribbon-cutting ceremony lived up to the advance billing. The hospital had touted the opening of the center as "a community event for all to celebrate. " "A lot of the people you see here are health-care and community workers who work with the elderly," Crawford said. "What this means to them is that the system is reaching out to them and saying, 'You've worked with the elderly and so have we: Now, let's do it together.
NEWS
September 18, 2009
"IT WAS a Wednesday evening, Sept. 2 in the City of Brotherly Love, where a candlelight vigil and health-care reform rally took place to honor the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's lifelong work in health-care needs and so much more. The event was at Love Park, where I told the crowd . . . " In memory of the great Sen. Teddy Kennedy, the Lion of the Senate who fought hard for the working man, union man and common man! We remember when he said the torch of the future was passed to Barack Obama during the presidential campaign.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 30, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Ending a yearlong negotiation, the Obama administration on Thursday approved Gov. Corbett's alternative Medicaid expansion proposal, a step that could extend health-care benefits to roughly 600,000 uninsured Pennsylvanians. In what was described as a five-year demonstration project, Pennsylvania got the go-ahead to use federal money to pay private insurers to provide health care to uninsured individuals - many in low-wage jobs. The Obama administration praised Pennsylvania for joining other states that opted into the program under the Affordable Care Act. Corbett administration officials called the agreement a successful compromise.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
NOT EVERYONE is outraged at the whopping news that Burger King is reincorporating in Canada in order to avoid taxes. The fast-food giant just bought the Canadian-based Tim Horton's doughnut chain and as part of the deal will keep the BK headquarters in Miami but incorporate the new entity in Canada, which has a lower effective tax rate than the U.S. Supporters of the move say that it's no big deal, that Burger King owes it to its shareholders to...
NEWS
August 12, 2014
IT MIGHT surprise you to know that a few - not many, but a few - Pennsylvania lawmakers are not, well, pigs. Over the years, I've occasionally noted how members of our Legislature do pretty well, thanks to taxpayer generosity. Actually, thanks to their own greed and taxpayer apathy. But not all take everything they can. Using Right to Know requests, the Daily News got data from the State Employees' Retirement System and the Legislature on lawmakers not grabbing the biggest bennies: generous health-care coverage and/or pensions.
REAL_ESTATE
August 11, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephen Klasko is the new president and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University and the Jefferson Health System. A fan of Star Trek , he wants to push Jefferson forward into the next century - steering away from health care's traditional model of big-edifice hospitals and real estate and instead toward localized medical offices. Jefferson's new offices in Fairmount will aim to do just that. The health-care giant will lease 12,000 square feet at developer Neal Rodin's new project, Rodin Square, putting Jefferson doctors in the same building as apartment dwellers.
FOOD
August 8, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Executive chef Paul Meola suggests a few options on his weekly lunch menu in the cafeteria at St. Luke's Hospital in Easton: vegetarian fried rice, hot pot soup, and lasagna. Sounds good. Even better: All the squash, broccoli, peppers, chard, and kale the chef roasts and sautes for these dishes comes from a new organic farm on five of the hospital's 500 acres. "This is brand new for all of us. It's really thrilling," says Meola, 61, who is poised to roll out fresh zucchini pancakes and tomato jam, too. The three-year-old Easton hospital, known as the Anderson Campus of the nonprofit St. Luke's University Health Network, is the first in Pennsylvania to start its own farm on the premises.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Siemens AG, a diversified German industrial giant, said it has agreed to sell its Malvern-based hospital information-technology division for $1.3 billion in cash to Cerner Corp. of Kansas City, Mo. The Siemens operations that are being sold employ more than 5,800 people worldwide, provide services at 5,000 client sites in 30 countries, and are expected to have $1.2 billion in revenue this year, Cerner said. Siemens Health Services, the IT business Cerner is buying, provides computer systems for both clinical and financial operations of hospitals.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
S COTT AMES, 27, of Center City, is co-founder with Dr. Grant Mitchell of Curbside Care in University City. The startup will provide on-demand calls by nurse practitioners and doctors to homes, offices and hotels in Center City beginning this month. Ames is a Wharton School MBA candidate; Mitchell is a graduate of Penn's School of Medicine and a Wharton MBA. I spoke with Ames. Q: How'd you come up with the idea? A: I was in Washington, D.C., and my fiancee got an ear infection.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a bid to cut Medicare spending and help pay for health-care changes, the Obama administration has significantly expanded audits designed to recover improper payments from health-care providers. "We are taking, I would say, a brutal spanking, those that are fully compliant and within regulation," said Tim Fox, founder and chief executive of Fox Rehabilitation, a Cherry Hill company that provides physical therapy and other services to the elderly. "It's dead easy to commit fraud under Medicare, and that's why there's so much fraud and abuse out there," Fox said.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lorraine E. Piccone, 79, a nurse and resident of Upper Darby and later, Broomall, died Friday, July 18, of septic shock at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital. Work and family were top priorities for Mrs. Piccone, whose maiden name was Shelzi. A talented and dedicated nurse, she graduated from Notre Dame Academy in Moylan and pursued her nursing studies and training at Pennsylvania Hospital Nursing School. She spent many years administering long-term care at Little Flower Manor and St. Francis Country House, Catholic nursing facilities in Darby Borough.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
The e-mail was 138 words of frustration. Alan Brooks' wife Cherylann, a diabetic with high blood pressure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), needed health insurance she couldn't afford. And now a charity clinic, her last lifeline to care, was being forced to close, purportedly because of the Affordable Care Act. For the last four years, Brooks' family has been surviving on his Social Security disability check. While his health care is covered by Medicare, Cherylann has had to rely on the charity clinic doctors at St. Luke's South Side Medical Center in Bethlehem to monitor and treat her conditions.
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