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NEWS
June 2, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Within a few weeks, President Clinton will unveil his proposal for reform of America's health-care system. Millions of words already have been spoken and written on behalf of one plan or another. And as the national debate focuses on the best approach, only brief public mention is given to why such reform is needed. The reasons for health-care reform are so obvious to analysts from Jackson Hole to Foggy Bottom that they tick them off in sound bites. But, to the consternation of these policy wonks, the public is only now paying attention to the "whys.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | By KEN WEINSTEIN
AS THE OWNER of a small business, it's clear to me that the debate over health-care reform has reached a critical moment. Over the summer, a shrill minority monopolized the public stage by playing on people's fears in their attempt to derail much needed change. It's time to take back the debate. The owners of small businesses must sift through the flurry of falsehoods and misstatements to discern the truth. We are sinking under the weight of health-care costs and the cost of not insuring all our employees.
NEWS
March 30, 2010
YOUR editorial "Corbett's Move Could Make Some Sick" makes a mockery of real issues pertaining to federal health-care legislation. You imply that Attorney General Tom Corbett is pandering to the "conservative base of his party. " Yet every single Republican, and many Democrats, voted against the bill, and according to the latest Rasmussen poll, 58 percent of Pennsylvanians opposed the bill. If anything, Corbett is pandering to the center of public opinion. You expressed no similar outrage when President Obama and Gov. Rendell used taxpayer funds on their public-relations blitz touting health-care reform.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | BY MATTHEW H. TAYLOR
Spiraling health costs, millions uninsured and uncertainty of keeping one's health insurance continue to dominate the news and (President) Clinton's view of the health-care system. The administration's proposal merely replaces one bloated bureaucratic mess (the insurance industry) with another over-grown, insensitive system (government managed insurance). Consumers, under either system, cannot exercise much control in determining what services they receive and at what cost. Reform which empowers consumers and weakens the health-care monopolies will stem the increasing costs and improve quality.
NEWS
July 13, 1986
The Health Care Cost Containment Act signed last week by Gov. Thornburgh is a worthy first step, but certainly no panacea, in bringing health-care delivery costs under control in Pennsylvania and defining more precisely who is in need of state assistance. Resulting from more than a year of work by business, labor, legislators, the Thornburgh administration, the health-insurance industry and health-care providers, the act creates a Health Care Cost Containment Council. Its 21 members will include the state secretaries of health and public welfare and the state insurance commissioner.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
A woman in western Pennsylvania tells her political commentator husband that if there's a single issue that will win her vote, it's health care. A man in central Pennsylvania writes his local newspaper, saying national health insurance is "the same old song" and wonders who pays, "the tooth fairy?" So it goes. National health insurance has become a hot issue in the U.S. Senate race between Sen. Harris Wofford and challenger Dick Thornburgh. Some call it a "pushbutton" issue.
NEWS
March 2, 1992 | BY JOHN P. COLMENARES
Medicine is "the science and art dealing with the management and cure of disease. " Disease, not health, is the focus of modern medicine. Our current medical system is a system organized against disease, not for health. In the United States we have an extremely sophisticated, well-structured medical care system - but no coherent, well-defined policy directed toward the health and welfare population. We share this dubious distinction with one other industrialized nation - South Africa.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
A tug-of-war over who is going to pay the ever-increasing bill for employee health-care benefits is expected to be the workplace issue of the '90s. Employers claim they can no longer afford to bear the burden alone, while a recent study by Metropolitan Life Insurance reported that more than half the country's labor leaders consider preserving health benefits more important than pay scales in coming negotiations. And most major industrial disputes last year turned, at least partly, on health care costs.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By T.J. McCarthy, Special to The Inquirer
S.A.M. Crawford, director of Kennedy Memorial Hospitals' new Gerontology Center in Stratford, found it easy to explain why the atmosphere at Friday's ribbon-cutting ceremony lived up to the advance billing. The hospital had touted the opening of the center as "a community event for all to celebrate. " "A lot of the people you see here are health-care and community workers who work with the elderly," Crawford said. "What this means to them is that the system is reaching out to them and saying, 'You've worked with the elderly and so have we: Now, let's do it together.
NEWS
September 18, 2009
"IT WAS a Wednesday evening, Sept. 2 in the City of Brotherly Love, where a candlelight vigil and health-care reform rally took place to honor the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's lifelong work in health-care needs and so much more. The event was at Love Park, where I told the crowd . . . " In memory of the great Sen. Teddy Kennedy, the Lion of the Senate who fought hard for the working man, union man and common man! We remember when he said the torch of the future was passed to Barack Obama during the presidential campaign.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 23, 2016 | By Lisa McBride, Andrea Gonzalez-Kirwin, and Nilsa Graciani
  In fewer than 10 years, the United States could be short more than 90,000 physicians. This looming doctor shortage will be especially problematic for Latinos, the fastest-growing segment of our population, for whom the proportion of Latino doctors to Latino patients has already dropped by 29 percent between 1980 and 2010. Physician shortages threaten a lack of access to care for patients, particularly in minority and low-income areas, given that minority physicians are more likely to practice in those areas.
NEWS
September 20, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
After Maura Rosato, a restaurant cook, sliced her hand at work not long ago, she weighed her health-care options thoughtfully. "I could go to my doctor," she said last week. "I could go to the emergency room. Or I could go here," she said, nodding toward the sweeping stone-and-glass exterior of LourdesCare at Cherry Hill, an ambulatory-care center on Route 70. More than a doctor's office, less than a hospital, capacious health-care facilities like this are sprouting along Route 70 in Cherry Hill, earning it the nickname "Health Care Highway" from Mayor Chuck Cahn.
NEWS
September 1, 2016
It was bad enough pharmaceutical giant Mylan jacked up the price of the life-saving EpiPen from $100 to $600 since 2007, but when it announced this week it would sell an identical generic for $300, it underscored the maddening state of American health care. The EpiPen, which gives people with severe allergies an emergency dosage of epinephrine, is an exclusive product of Mylan. Competitors are developing alternatives, but some hit unexpected setbacks or may not be ready for market for a year or two. That gives Mylan control over its drug costs for now, something free marketers may argue the company should have.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Accolade Inc., which contracts with self-insured employers and insurers to help beneficiaries navigate health care, on Thursday announce that it raised more than $70 million from investors led by Andreessen Horowitz, a prominent Silicon Valley venture capital firm. Founded in the Philadelphia region in 2007, Accolade now has joint headquarters in Plymouth Meeting and Seattle, where the company's new chief executive, Rajeev Singh, is based. Accolade, which employs around 500 in Plymouth Meeting, said it will use the new venture capital to further develop its technology, invest in research and development, and expand its sales and marketing reach.
NEWS
August 10, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
Philadelphia has plenty of primary-care providers overall, but there is far less access to care in communities with the highest concentrations of African American residents, according to a new study. While the general findings were not a surprise - highly segregated black (and, to a lesser extent, Hispanic) areas were known to have fewer medical practitioners - the difference was bigger than the researchers had expected. The effect was independent of neighborhood poverty rates, which turned out to be less significant than anticipated, although it is not clear why. The results pointed to the limitations even of sweeping legislation such as President Obama's Affordable Care Act, which led to unprecedented reductions in the number of people without insurance.
NEWS
August 8, 2016
Marybeth Hagan is a writer in Merion Station The balloons have fallen and Democratic National Conventioneers went their merry ways. Yet one recurring theme of that Philadelphia political event left me uneasy. Democrats seem dead set on being the party that celebrates abortion and bills taxpayers for it. While some convention speakers spoke of abortion as "reproductive health care," others openly crowed the word. Ilyse Hogue, NARAL Pro-Choice America's president, took that verbalization one step further and talked about her abortion years ago. "I wanted a family, but it was the wrong time," Hogue said.
NEWS
August 2, 2016 | By Sally C. Pipes
  President Obama recently took to the Journal of the American Medical Association to defend his health-care law and recommend additional reforms. Among them? A government-run "public option" designed to compete against insurers on the exchanges. Instead of looking to increase the federal government's role in health care yet again, he should have cribbed from House Speaker Paul Ryan's health-care blueprint, which was released late last month as part of his "A Better Way" reform agenda.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
A Horsham company that provides bedside X-rays and other diagnostic services will move 63 call-center jobs to Clearwater, Fla., in September. About 100 people will remain in the Horsham office of MobilexUSA, Mary Berberich, a sales support supervisor in Horsham, said Friday. The layoff announcement was posted Thursday on the Pennsylvania Department of Labor's web site. The Horsham call center employees have been offered the chance to relocate, and MobilexUSA's human resources department is trying to find jobs for them in other local call centers, Berberich said.
NEWS
July 26, 2016
Few conditions are more divisive and frustrating than income inequality. Even as rising profits and productivity have produced higher incomes for more affluent Americans, many middle- and lower-income families are struggling. That disparity resonated with voters in the primaries and caucuses leading up to this week's Democratic National Convention. Executive pay is 276 times the average worker's pay. Meanwhile, average wages have steadily lost buying power since 1979 because they have not kept pace with the cost of living.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, Staff Writer
Bernie Sanders may not bring chaos to the convention in Philadelphia as GOP runner-up Ted Cruz did in Cleveland, but the Vermont senator's influence on the campaign and where Hillary Clinton and the Democratic Party stand on issues such as trade and health care will be impossible to miss this week. Sanders drew tens of thousands of people to his rallies, where he railed against a "rigged" economy and corrupt campaign-finance system that he argued were transforming America into a plutocracy.
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