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NEWS
June 2, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Within a few weeks, President Clinton will unveil his proposal for reform of America's health-care system. Millions of words already have been spoken and written on behalf of one plan or another. And as the national debate focuses on the best approach, only brief public mention is given to why such reform is needed. The reasons for health-care reform are so obvious to analysts from Jackson Hole to Foggy Bottom that they tick them off in sound bites. But, to the consternation of these policy wonks, the public is only now paying attention to the "whys.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | By KEN WEINSTEIN
AS THE OWNER of a small business, it's clear to me that the debate over health-care reform has reached a critical moment. Over the summer, a shrill minority monopolized the public stage by playing on people's fears in their attempt to derail much needed change. It's time to take back the debate. The owners of small businesses must sift through the flurry of falsehoods and misstatements to discern the truth. We are sinking under the weight of health-care costs and the cost of not insuring all our employees.
NEWS
March 30, 2010
YOUR editorial "Corbett's Move Could Make Some Sick" makes a mockery of real issues pertaining to federal health-care legislation. You imply that Attorney General Tom Corbett is pandering to the "conservative base of his party. " Yet every single Republican, and many Democrats, voted against the bill, and according to the latest Rasmussen poll, 58 percent of Pennsylvanians opposed the bill. If anything, Corbett is pandering to the center of public opinion. You expressed no similar outrage when President Obama and Gov. Rendell used taxpayer funds on their public-relations blitz touting health-care reform.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | BY MATTHEW H. TAYLOR
Spiraling health costs, millions uninsured and uncertainty of keeping one's health insurance continue to dominate the news and (President) Clinton's view of the health-care system. The administration's proposal merely replaces one bloated bureaucratic mess (the insurance industry) with another over-grown, insensitive system (government managed insurance). Consumers, under either system, cannot exercise much control in determining what services they receive and at what cost. Reform which empowers consumers and weakens the health-care monopolies will stem the increasing costs and improve quality.
NEWS
July 13, 1986
The Health Care Cost Containment Act signed last week by Gov. Thornburgh is a worthy first step, but certainly no panacea, in bringing health-care delivery costs under control in Pennsylvania and defining more precisely who is in need of state assistance. Resulting from more than a year of work by business, labor, legislators, the Thornburgh administration, the health-insurance industry and health-care providers, the act creates a Health Care Cost Containment Council. Its 21 members will include the state secretaries of health and public welfare and the state insurance commissioner.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
A woman in western Pennsylvania tells her political commentator husband that if there's a single issue that will win her vote, it's health care. A man in central Pennsylvania writes his local newspaper, saying national health insurance is "the same old song" and wonders who pays, "the tooth fairy?" So it goes. National health insurance has become a hot issue in the U.S. Senate race between Sen. Harris Wofford and challenger Dick Thornburgh. Some call it a "pushbutton" issue.
NEWS
March 2, 1992 | BY JOHN P. COLMENARES
Medicine is "the science and art dealing with the management and cure of disease. " Disease, not health, is the focus of modern medicine. Our current medical system is a system organized against disease, not for health. In the United States we have an extremely sophisticated, well-structured medical care system - but no coherent, well-defined policy directed toward the health and welfare population. We share this dubious distinction with one other industrialized nation - South Africa.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
A tug-of-war over who is going to pay the ever-increasing bill for employee health-care benefits is expected to be the workplace issue of the '90s. Employers claim they can no longer afford to bear the burden alone, while a recent study by Metropolitan Life Insurance reported that more than half the country's labor leaders consider preserving health benefits more important than pay scales in coming negotiations. And most major industrial disputes last year turned, at least partly, on health care costs.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By T.J. McCarthy, Special to The Inquirer
S.A.M. Crawford, director of Kennedy Memorial Hospitals' new Gerontology Center in Stratford, found it easy to explain why the atmosphere at Friday's ribbon-cutting ceremony lived up to the advance billing. The hospital had touted the opening of the center as "a community event for all to celebrate. " "A lot of the people you see here are health-care and community workers who work with the elderly," Crawford said. "What this means to them is that the system is reaching out to them and saying, 'You've worked with the elderly and so have we: Now, let's do it together.
NEWS
September 18, 2009
"IT WAS a Wednesday evening, Sept. 2 in the City of Brotherly Love, where a candlelight vigil and health-care reform rally took place to honor the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's lifelong work in health-care needs and so much more. The event was at Love Park, where I told the crowd . . . " In memory of the great Sen. Teddy Kennedy, the Lion of the Senate who fought hard for the working man, union man and common man! We remember when he said the torch of the future was passed to Barack Obama during the presidential campaign.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 15, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Most of us don't know exactly where our tax money goes; neither do we know precisely which government programs our taxes fund. But expect sticker shock from those of us socked with the new 3.8 percent net investment income tax. Most probably, you thought this tax was signed into law to fund Medicare - I mistakenly thought so. Owners of small and medium-size businesses have been particularly piqued this filing season to discover that this money does...
NEWS
April 14, 2014
Right medicine Physician Valerie Arkoosh is a rising star in the 13th Congressional District Democratic primary ("13th District rivals mix it up," April 8). As the only noncareer politician, she has outraised her opponents. Yet an Inquirer report noting that doctors and medical groups are Arkoosh's biggest donors diminishes the very people who believe in her - many of whom are progressive physicians who see firsthand how Washington dysfunction hurts patients and communities. A majority are women who want a tireless advocate for expanded access to health care.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
  DIVYA DHAR, 28, of Cambridge, Mass., is CEO and co-founder of Seratis. Dhar's company is a University City startup that was one of 10 health-care startups that participated in a boot camp in 2013 to speed development of their business models. Seratis has built a mobile app to enable doctors, nurses and others to coordinate, track and analyze patient care via text, images and videos. Dhar, a New Zealand citizen, is completing a master's degree at Wharton and Harvard Kennedy School and then will move to Philly.
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | BY JAY FELDSTEIN, D.O
  MANY health-care leaders across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania are debating Governor Tom Corbett's proposed plan to change the state's current medical assistance program. Unless facts drive the debate, Pennsylvanians may face significant challenges in accessing quality health care. Here are the facts: Our current medical assistance managed-care program - known as HealthChoices - is an indispensable cornerstone of our state's health-care system. HealthChoices, administered by managed-care organizations (MCOs)
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
It was February when the woman walked into Alex Walker's North Philadelphia office to have her tax return done. Finishing her return, the Jackson Hewitt tax preparer asked whether she had health insurance. The woman said she wasn't sure - things were changing at work. "I told her to find out what her job was doing and come back and see me before March 31st," Walker said. The woman returned last week, and Walker helped her fill out the application for coverage through the marketplace under the Affordable Care Act. A licensed insurance broker working with Jackson Hewitt then contacted the woman at home, helped her choose a plan, and completed the enrollment.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pharmaceuticals wholesaler AmerisourceBergen resumed its expansion into foreign markets Monday, saying it will invest about $100 million for a minority stake in a leading distributor in Brazil, Profarma Distribuidora de Produtos Farmacêuticos S.A. AmerisourceBergen, headquartered in Valley Forge, is the second largest distributor of prescription medicine in the United States, as measured by revenue. Brazil is the world's fifth most populous country, with about 200 million people, so there is opportunity, but also immense challenges.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The planned financial split this summer of the Jefferson Health System will result in two organizations close to the same size in terms of revenues, but not in term of profits. Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals Inc. had $1.55 billion in revenues in the year ended June 30, compared with $1.43 billion at Main Line Health Inc., according to data released this week. But Main Line, which owns four acute-care hospitals in Philadelphia's relatively affluent western suburbs, had $157 million in operating profit in fiscal 2013, twice as much as the $74 million reported by Thomas Jefferson.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK: THE LIFE & TIMES OF KATRINA GILBERT. 9 tonight, HBO.   YOU'D PROBABLY count yourself lucky to have someone like Katrina Gilbert taking care of a person you love. A certified nursing assistant who spends her days - sometimes as many as eight in a row - lifting, feeding, cleaning and otherwise caring for the residents of a Tennessee convalescent home, Gilbert actually seems willing to listen to those who no longer get much of a hearing from anyone else.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Politics, 'Funny' style Need to get your message heard? You have to go to where the peeps are. In that light, there's nothing funny about President Obama 's decision to talk health-care reform on satirical website Funny or Die ( www.funnyordie.com ). A vid posted on Hangover star Zach Galifianakis ' Funny or Die series Between Two Ferns shows the president entering a jocular interchange with the comic. ZG wanted to engage the world leader about our nation's plans for dealing with aggressor North Ikea, but Obama was eager to get his message out. "What'd you come here to plug?"
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