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NEWS
June 2, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Within a few weeks, President Clinton will unveil his proposal for reform of America's health-care system. Millions of words already have been spoken and written on behalf of one plan or another. And as the national debate focuses on the best approach, only brief public mention is given to why such reform is needed. The reasons for health-care reform are so obvious to analysts from Jackson Hole to Foggy Bottom that they tick them off in sound bites. But, to the consternation of these policy wonks, the public is only now paying attention to the "whys.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | By KEN WEINSTEIN
AS THE OWNER of a small business, it's clear to me that the debate over health-care reform has reached a critical moment. Over the summer, a shrill minority monopolized the public stage by playing on people's fears in their attempt to derail much needed change. It's time to take back the debate. The owners of small businesses must sift through the flurry of falsehoods and misstatements to discern the truth. We are sinking under the weight of health-care costs and the cost of not insuring all our employees.
NEWS
March 30, 2010
YOUR editorial "Corbett's Move Could Make Some Sick" makes a mockery of real issues pertaining to federal health-care legislation. You imply that Attorney General Tom Corbett is pandering to the "conservative base of his party. " Yet every single Republican, and many Democrats, voted against the bill, and according to the latest Rasmussen poll, 58 percent of Pennsylvanians opposed the bill. If anything, Corbett is pandering to the center of public opinion. You expressed no similar outrage when President Obama and Gov. Rendell used taxpayer funds on their public-relations blitz touting health-care reform.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | BY MATTHEW H. TAYLOR
Spiraling health costs, millions uninsured and uncertainty of keeping one's health insurance continue to dominate the news and (President) Clinton's view of the health-care system. The administration's proposal merely replaces one bloated bureaucratic mess (the insurance industry) with another over-grown, insensitive system (government managed insurance). Consumers, under either system, cannot exercise much control in determining what services they receive and at what cost. Reform which empowers consumers and weakens the health-care monopolies will stem the increasing costs and improve quality.
NEWS
July 13, 1986
The Health Care Cost Containment Act signed last week by Gov. Thornburgh is a worthy first step, but certainly no panacea, in bringing health-care delivery costs under control in Pennsylvania and defining more precisely who is in need of state assistance. Resulting from more than a year of work by business, labor, legislators, the Thornburgh administration, the health-insurance industry and health-care providers, the act creates a Health Care Cost Containment Council. Its 21 members will include the state secretaries of health and public welfare and the state insurance commissioner.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
A woman in western Pennsylvania tells her political commentator husband that if there's a single issue that will win her vote, it's health care. A man in central Pennsylvania writes his local newspaper, saying national health insurance is "the same old song" and wonders who pays, "the tooth fairy?" So it goes. National health insurance has become a hot issue in the U.S. Senate race between Sen. Harris Wofford and challenger Dick Thornburgh. Some call it a "pushbutton" issue.
NEWS
March 2, 1992 | BY JOHN P. COLMENARES
Medicine is "the science and art dealing with the management and cure of disease. " Disease, not health, is the focus of modern medicine. Our current medical system is a system organized against disease, not for health. In the United States we have an extremely sophisticated, well-structured medical care system - but no coherent, well-defined policy directed toward the health and welfare population. We share this dubious distinction with one other industrialized nation - South Africa.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
A tug-of-war over who is going to pay the ever-increasing bill for employee health-care benefits is expected to be the workplace issue of the '90s. Employers claim they can no longer afford to bear the burden alone, while a recent study by Metropolitan Life Insurance reported that more than half the country's labor leaders consider preserving health benefits more important than pay scales in coming negotiations. And most major industrial disputes last year turned, at least partly, on health care costs.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By T.J. McCarthy, Special to The Inquirer
S.A.M. Crawford, director of Kennedy Memorial Hospitals' new Gerontology Center in Stratford, found it easy to explain why the atmosphere at Friday's ribbon-cutting ceremony lived up to the advance billing. The hospital had touted the opening of the center as "a community event for all to celebrate. " "A lot of the people you see here are health-care and community workers who work with the elderly," Crawford said. "What this means to them is that the system is reaching out to them and saying, 'You've worked with the elderly and so have we: Now, let's do it together.
NEWS
March 16, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Single-payer systems work A determination as to whether a health-care system is working must be based on three factors: access, cost, and outcomes. A commentary about single-payer health care barely touches on two of these factors while not mentioning outcomes ("Single-payer health care unworkable, too costly," March 8). U.S. health-care spending is the highest in the world, yet we rank 37th in the world in quality of care and have the lowest life expectancy among major industrialized countries: 78.8 years in 2013, compared with a median of 81.2 years among those countries.
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NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Phil Galewitz, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
In states that expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, low-income adults were more likely to see a doctor, stay overnight in a hospital, and receive their first diagnoses of diabetes and high cholesterol, according to a study published Monday. Yet researchers found no improvement in adults' own assessments of their health, a conclusion echoed by similar studies, the authors wrote in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Two factors might explain the lack of perceived improvement.
NEWS
March 16, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Single-payer systems work A determination as to whether a health-care system is working must be based on three factors: access, cost, and outcomes. A commentary about single-payer health care barely touches on two of these factors while not mentioning outcomes ("Single-payer health care unworkable, too costly," March 8). U.S. health-care spending is the highest in the world, yet we rank 37th in the world in quality of care and have the lowest life expectancy among major industrialized countries: 78.8 years in 2013, compared with a median of 81.2 years among those countries.
NEWS
March 13, 2016
Q How do I use the hospital ratings information I keep seeing online? A:Before I choose a car, appliance, or even a restaurant, I check out ratings and reviews. Your purchase of health care should get the same attention - or more. At least 10 different websites list quality and safety ratings for Pennsylvania hospitals. You can and should use this information in your search for a hospital. Hospital Compare, Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council, and the Joint Commission Top Performers are among the most trustworthy places to look.
NEWS
March 11, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH INSURANCE A sour side of the land of milk and honey I have relatives in Northern Ireland and Canada and friends from Australia. Not one of them has ever said, "We wish we had the health-care plan you have in the United States" ("Single-payer health care unworkable, too costly," Tuesday). |Desmond McCaffery, Trooper
NEWS
March 9, 2016 | By Leonard Pitts Jr
By Peter J. Pitts In an attempt to halt Bernie Sanders' rise in the polls, Hillary Clinton is waging a campaign against his single-payer health plan. Remarkably, one of Clinton's main criticisms is that Sanders' scheme would undermine the cause of federally controlled health care by giving too much power to the states. Yes, we must be in an election year. As Clinton has put it, Sanders "wants to roll Medicare, Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program, the Affordable Care Act program, and private health insurance into a national system and turn it over to the states to administer.
NEWS
March 8, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
For Kathy Jordan, cats are like potato chips. You can't have just one. It's a motto that led the 58-year-old financial adviser to adopt her first cat in 1991, and to rescue another just years later. It led to establishing Green Street Rescue, a Philadelphia cat adoption center, in 2005, and along the way, to fostering hundreds of cats of her own. This weekend, it again led the Fairmount woman to perhaps her most crowning achievement: opening Philadelphia's first feline cafe.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
Since returning to the ranks of publicly traded companies a year ago through its merger with Skilled Healthcare Group Inc., Kennett Square's Genesis HealthCare Inc. has had a rough ride. The price of its shares has plummeted to $1.80 from $8.77 Feb. 2, 2015, the day the merger was completed, and the company this week reported a net loss of $426 million on revenue of $5.6 billion in 2015, up from $254 million in 2014, when Genesis had $4.8 billion in revenue. Genesis' chief executive, George V. Hager Jr., assured analysts Tuesday on a conference call to discuss the earnings report that the company was in good shape for the long haul, despite near-term turbulence in the nursing-home industry.
NEWS
February 16, 2016 | By Charles Krauthammer
The New Hampshire results have solidified the reigning cliché that the 2016 campaign is an antiestablishment revolt of both the left and the right. Largely overlooked, however, is the role played in setting the national mood by the seven-year legacy of the Obama presidency. Yes, you hear constant denunciations of institutions, parties, leaders, donors, lobbyists, influence peddlers. But the starting point of the bipartisan critique is the social, economic, and geopolitical wreckage all around us. Bernie Sanders is careful never to blame Obama directly, but his description of the America Obama leaves behind is devastating - a wasteland of stagnant wages, rising inequality, a sinking middle class, young people crushed by debt, and the American Dream dying.
NEWS
February 16, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Protect professionals By a vote of 177-0, Pennsylvania's House of Representatives sent a message Wednesday that more can be done to protect the state's health-care workers from assault during the performance of their jobs. House Bill 1219 adds health-care professionals to a protected class of individuals in cases of assault. Sponsored by Rep. Judy Ward (R., Blair), the bill raises the penalty from a second-degree misdemeanor to a felony. Nearly 60 percent of nonfatal assaults and violent acts occur in the health-care and social-assistance industry.
NEWS
February 16, 2016 | By Lilo H. Stainton, NJ Spotlight
There are two New Jerseys, particularly when it comes to public health. There are the urban hubs, older cities in the north and central Jersey with their mix of poverty and prosperity, often sitting side by side with affluent suburbs. And there are the vast rural stretches, including much of the state's south, with its farming communities and former waterfront factory towns. They both face many of the same public health issues: childhood obesity, undiagnosed and untreated diseases such as diabetes and cancer, smoking, and opioid addiction.
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