CollectionsHealth Care
IN THE NEWS

Health Care

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 2, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Within a few weeks, President Clinton will unveil his proposal for reform of America's health-care system. Millions of words already have been spoken and written on behalf of one plan or another. And as the national debate focuses on the best approach, only brief public mention is given to why such reform is needed. The reasons for health-care reform are so obvious to analysts from Jackson Hole to Foggy Bottom that they tick them off in sound bites. But, to the consternation of these policy wonks, the public is only now paying attention to the "whys.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | By KEN WEINSTEIN
AS THE OWNER of a small business, it's clear to me that the debate over health-care reform has reached a critical moment. Over the summer, a shrill minority monopolized the public stage by playing on people's fears in their attempt to derail much needed change. It's time to take back the debate. The owners of small businesses must sift through the flurry of falsehoods and misstatements to discern the truth. We are sinking under the weight of health-care costs and the cost of not insuring all our employees.
NEWS
March 30, 2010
YOUR editorial "Corbett's Move Could Make Some Sick" makes a mockery of real issues pertaining to federal health-care legislation. You imply that Attorney General Tom Corbett is pandering to the "conservative base of his party. " Yet every single Republican, and many Democrats, voted against the bill, and according to the latest Rasmussen poll, 58 percent of Pennsylvanians opposed the bill. If anything, Corbett is pandering to the center of public opinion. You expressed no similar outrage when President Obama and Gov. Rendell used taxpayer funds on their public-relations blitz touting health-care reform.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | BY MATTHEW H. TAYLOR
Spiraling health costs, millions uninsured and uncertainty of keeping one's health insurance continue to dominate the news and (President) Clinton's view of the health-care system. The administration's proposal merely replaces one bloated bureaucratic mess (the insurance industry) with another over-grown, insensitive system (government managed insurance). Consumers, under either system, cannot exercise much control in determining what services they receive and at what cost. Reform which empowers consumers and weakens the health-care monopolies will stem the increasing costs and improve quality.
NEWS
July 13, 1986
The Health Care Cost Containment Act signed last week by Gov. Thornburgh is a worthy first step, but certainly no panacea, in bringing health-care delivery costs under control in Pennsylvania and defining more precisely who is in need of state assistance. Resulting from more than a year of work by business, labor, legislators, the Thornburgh administration, the health-insurance industry and health-care providers, the act creates a Health Care Cost Containment Council. Its 21 members will include the state secretaries of health and public welfare and the state insurance commissioner.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
A woman in western Pennsylvania tells her political commentator husband that if there's a single issue that will win her vote, it's health care. A man in central Pennsylvania writes his local newspaper, saying national health insurance is "the same old song" and wonders who pays, "the tooth fairy?" So it goes. National health insurance has become a hot issue in the U.S. Senate race between Sen. Harris Wofford and challenger Dick Thornburgh. Some call it a "pushbutton" issue.
NEWS
March 2, 1992 | BY JOHN P. COLMENARES
Medicine is "the science and art dealing with the management and cure of disease. " Disease, not health, is the focus of modern medicine. Our current medical system is a system organized against disease, not for health. In the United States we have an extremely sophisticated, well-structured medical care system - but no coherent, well-defined policy directed toward the health and welfare population. We share this dubious distinction with one other industrialized nation - South Africa.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
A tug-of-war over who is going to pay the ever-increasing bill for employee health-care benefits is expected to be the workplace issue of the '90s. Employers claim they can no longer afford to bear the burden alone, while a recent study by Metropolitan Life Insurance reported that more than half the country's labor leaders consider preserving health benefits more important than pay scales in coming negotiations. And most major industrial disputes last year turned, at least partly, on health care costs.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By T.J. McCarthy, Special to The Inquirer
S.A.M. Crawford, director of Kennedy Memorial Hospitals' new Gerontology Center in Stratford, found it easy to explain why the atmosphere at Friday's ribbon-cutting ceremony lived up to the advance billing. The hospital had touted the opening of the center as "a community event for all to celebrate. " "A lot of the people you see here are health-care and community workers who work with the elderly," Crawford said. "What this means to them is that the system is reaching out to them and saying, 'You've worked with the elderly and so have we: Now, let's do it together.
NEWS
September 18, 2009
"IT WAS a Wednesday evening, Sept. 2 in the City of Brotherly Love, where a candlelight vigil and health-care reform rally took place to honor the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's lifelong work in health-care needs and so much more. The event was at Love Park, where I told the crowd . . . " In memory of the great Sen. Teddy Kennedy, the Lion of the Senate who fought hard for the working man, union man and common man! We remember when he said the torch of the future was passed to Barack Obama during the presidential campaign.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School District is considering outsourcing its health services, officials said Wednesday - a move that might mean privatizing jobs held by unionized school nurses. Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said the district, rocked by years of brutal budgets, has to find a way to expand medical services and was exploring bringing in private providers to do so. "With the significant cuts that we've made, it's impacted our ability to deliver health services to all children that need those services," Hite said.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia is well-known as medicine central, with one of the nation's highest concentrations of hospitals and specialists. But a new University of Pennsylvania study finds that in health care, as in so many other realms that intersect with economics, there are two Philadelphias. In certain low-income neighborhoods, the Penn researchers counted close to 3,000 adults for every primary-care provider. That translates into some residents having to wait months for an appointment.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
RACERS HAVE plenty to focus on during a 10-mile run. How to keep a man's heart beating and lungs pumping isn't usually one of them. But that's exactly what a group of about 12 health-care workers competing in the Broad Street Run went through on Sunday when one of their own collapsed right in front of them. Thanks to their efforts, that 31-year-old man is alive today. After seeing their colleague off in an ambulance, those lifesavers all went on to finish the race. "People stopped out of the kindness of their hearts as soon as he went down," said Kristen, a physician's assistant who didn't want her last name published.
NEWS
April 30, 2015
ISSUE | ENGLISH STUDIES Be the Bard I couldn't disagree more with my good friend professor Nora Johnson at Swarthmore about not requiring college English majors to take a course devoted to Shakespeare and his works ("A lack of Will: Bard rarely required on campus," April 24). As chair of La Salle University's English department, and as someone trained as a medievalist but who writes on television and film, I am hardly a hidebound defender of the canon. Begrudgingly, at La Salle, we do not require courses in Chaucer, Milton, and others, but we do in Shakespeare - because there is no match in terms of historical and global importance and influence.
NEWS
April 29, 2015
ISSUE | NEXT MAYOR Worthy pleadings The mayoral candidates' suggestions for dealing with Philadelphia's staggering poverty problem left out one critical need: increased funding for civil legal aid to poor people ("Mayoral Q&A," April 24). Philadelphia has one of the very best legal-aid programs in the nation, one that is known for aggressively representing low-income Philadelphians, making sure their problems are heard and addressed, and pushing for systems and policies to be fixed when they harm vulnerable poor families.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When investors first called Tom Spann with their idea of making health care more accessible, he thought they were nuts, to put it politely. No way was he going to leave a senior management job - leading a $2 billion unit of the consulting group Accenture, for "the most cockamamie thing I ever heard," Spann said. Even so, in 2007, Spann did just that, leaving Accenture to become founding chief executive of Accolade Inc. in Plymouth Meeting. The cockamamie idea was to create a concierge business, hired by companies such as Lowe's and Comcast to help their employees navigate the health-care system.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - When Gov. Christie slashed spending for women's health services in his first term, legislators and advocates feared that women would lose access to a range of needed health-care services. The Christie administration now is saying women have greater access to such services in New Jersey than they did before he took office in 2010. Appearing before the Senate Budget Committee on Tuesday, Health Commissioner Mary E. O'Dowd said the number of women served by federally qualified health centers has increased 25 percent since 2009, more than offsetting the number of women who lost access to family planning centers because of Christie's budget cuts and vetoes.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Commonwealth Court on Friday upheld a year-old lower-court decision that restored $125.8 million in tobacco-settlement money to Pennsylvania. The money had been stripped from the state's share of a 2003 payment under the landmark 1998 agreement by major tobacco companies to compensate states for their health-care costs related to smoking. "We are very pleased with the Commonwealth Court's decision, which ensures the terms of the [master settlement agreement] are followed by the arbitration panel and that Pennsylvania is fairly treated under the terms of the agreement," Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane said in a statement.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the morning of her annual physical, Judy Dohany sat on the edge of the examining table at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital with the happy anticipation of a good student waiting for a favorite professor's feedback. "I couldn't wait to see Dr. Ziring," Dohany said. "I like to keep tabs on my blood pressure. I'm 50 now. Things start to happen. I've lost friends to heart attacks. My best friend has diabetes. It scares me. " For nearly 20 years, her internist, Barry Ziring, has been giving her annual physical exams, a ritual that for just as long has been deemed unhelpful and even harmful.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rising labor and health-care costs are the biggest drivers of a 2.84 percent increase in SEPTA's operating budget proposed for the financial year that starts July 1. The $1.36 billion budget calls for 70 more employees - mostly in safety and construction-support positions - and would make permanent the all-night subway service on Fridays and Saturdays that began as an experiment this year. The budget assumes no fare increases. It anticipates a state subsidy of $658 million, up by $29 million from this year's spending plan.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|