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NEWS
June 2, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Within a few weeks, President Clinton will unveil his proposal for reform of America's health-care system. Millions of words already have been spoken and written on behalf of one plan or another. And as the national debate focuses on the best approach, only brief public mention is given to why such reform is needed. The reasons for health-care reform are so obvious to analysts from Jackson Hole to Foggy Bottom that they tick them off in sound bites. But, to the consternation of these policy wonks, the public is only now paying attention to the "whys.
NEWS
October 22, 2009 | By KEN WEINSTEIN
AS THE OWNER of a small business, it's clear to me that the debate over health-care reform has reached a critical moment. Over the summer, a shrill minority monopolized the public stage by playing on people's fears in their attempt to derail much needed change. It's time to take back the debate. The owners of small businesses must sift through the flurry of falsehoods and misstatements to discern the truth. We are sinking under the weight of health-care costs and the cost of not insuring all our employees.
NEWS
March 30, 2010
YOUR editorial "Corbett's Move Could Make Some Sick" makes a mockery of real issues pertaining to federal health-care legislation. You imply that Attorney General Tom Corbett is pandering to the "conservative base of his party. " Yet every single Republican, and many Democrats, voted against the bill, and according to the latest Rasmussen poll, 58 percent of Pennsylvanians opposed the bill. If anything, Corbett is pandering to the center of public opinion. You expressed no similar outrage when President Obama and Gov. Rendell used taxpayer funds on their public-relations blitz touting health-care reform.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | BY MATTHEW H. TAYLOR
Spiraling health costs, millions uninsured and uncertainty of keeping one's health insurance continue to dominate the news and (President) Clinton's view of the health-care system. The administration's proposal merely replaces one bloated bureaucratic mess (the insurance industry) with another over-grown, insensitive system (government managed insurance). Consumers, under either system, cannot exercise much control in determining what services they receive and at what cost. Reform which empowers consumers and weakens the health-care monopolies will stem the increasing costs and improve quality.
NEWS
July 13, 1986
The Health Care Cost Containment Act signed last week by Gov. Thornburgh is a worthy first step, but certainly no panacea, in bringing health-care delivery costs under control in Pennsylvania and defining more precisely who is in need of state assistance. Resulting from more than a year of work by business, labor, legislators, the Thornburgh administration, the health-insurance industry and health-care providers, the act creates a Health Care Cost Containment Council. Its 21 members will include the state secretaries of health and public welfare and the state insurance commissioner.
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
A woman in western Pennsylvania tells her political commentator husband that if there's a single issue that will win her vote, it's health care. A man in central Pennsylvania writes his local newspaper, saying national health insurance is "the same old song" and wonders who pays, "the tooth fairy?" So it goes. National health insurance has become a hot issue in the U.S. Senate race between Sen. Harris Wofford and challenger Dick Thornburgh. Some call it a "pushbutton" issue.
NEWS
March 2, 1992 | BY JOHN P. COLMENARES
Medicine is "the science and art dealing with the management and cure of disease. " Disease, not health, is the focus of modern medicine. Our current medical system is a system organized against disease, not for health. In the United States we have an extremely sophisticated, well-structured medical care system - but no coherent, well-defined policy directed toward the health and welfare population. We share this dubious distinction with one other industrialized nation - South Africa.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
A tug-of-war over who is going to pay the ever-increasing bill for employee health-care benefits is expected to be the workplace issue of the '90s. Employers claim they can no longer afford to bear the burden alone, while a recent study by Metropolitan Life Insurance reported that more than half the country's labor leaders consider preserving health benefits more important than pay scales in coming negotiations. And most major industrial disputes last year turned, at least partly, on health care costs.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | By T.J. McCarthy, Special to The Inquirer
S.A.M. Crawford, director of Kennedy Memorial Hospitals' new Gerontology Center in Stratford, found it easy to explain why the atmosphere at Friday's ribbon-cutting ceremony lived up to the advance billing. The hospital had touted the opening of the center as "a community event for all to celebrate. " "A lot of the people you see here are health-care and community workers who work with the elderly," Crawford said. "What this means to them is that the system is reaching out to them and saying, 'You've worked with the elderly and so have we: Now, let's do it together.
NEWS
September 18, 2009
"IT WAS a Wednesday evening, Sept. 2 in the City of Brotherly Love, where a candlelight vigil and health-care reform rally took place to honor the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy's lifelong work in health-care needs and so much more. The event was at Love Park, where I told the crowd . . . " In memory of the great Sen. Teddy Kennedy, the Lion of the Senate who fought hard for the working man, union man and common man! We remember when he said the torch of the future was passed to Barack Obama during the presidential campaign.
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NEWS
February 25, 2015
ON BEHALF of Planned Parenthood Southeastern Pennsylvania, I congratulate Gov. Wolf for his recent announcement that Pennsylvania will move away from the Healthy PA plan to a much more comprehensive full expansion of Medicaid. The federal money has already been set aside to expand preventive and lifesaving health care to hardworking women and their families in our state, and we finally have a governor willing to implement this program. The expansion will be 100 percent financed with federal money through 2016, and by at least 90 percent in 2017 and thereafter.
NEWS
February 13, 2015
NEWLY elected governor Tom Wolf is clearly working on his to-do list. He has already taken action on two big issues he campaigned on. Yesterday, he announced a proposal to impose a 5 percent fracking tax on those drilling for natural gas in the state. And Monday, he announced that he has sent a letter to the feds withdrawing the state's participation in Healthy PA, a complicated Medicaid expansion alternative that former Gov. Tom Corbett enacted in the last months of his administration.
NEWS
February 9, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When it comes to health care, what do women want? It's a question that's increasingly important to the nation's hospitals, given that women are often the family's primary researchers, advocates, caregivers, and decision-makers for health care. Women make over 80 percent of health-care choices, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. They choose their children's doctors (85 percent), take them to appointments (84 percent), and ensure they get recommended care (79 percent), reports the Kaiser Family Foundation.
NEWS
February 8, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Thomas Jefferson health system is midway through what it hopes will be a transformation - improving the health of employees and then creating a new wellness model to market to area businesses. Two years ago, after its own health-care costs rose 22 percent in one year, Jefferson implemented a series of incentives to encourage its 12,000 employees to get fit, including a 15 percent discount in what employees pay for health insurance if they meet certain criteria. "We tried to introduce wellness as a culture," said Pamela Teufel, chief human resources officer.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THEY BROUGHT her baby wipes. With her cheek flayed open, nose crushed and eyes swelling shut, Micheal Allen needed a Band-Aid, gauze, antiseptic - something - to stop the flow of blood until she could get to the hospital. Instead, a staffer at the Kintock Center, a North Philadelphia halfway house where resident Allen had been attacked by another resident, brought her baby wipes when she couldn't get into the nurse's locked office after the assault last May. Later, when her cheek swelled into a "big blood-filled pocket," Allen said, it took a week before she could persuade a staffer to bring her back to the hospital for care.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloria Yocum Marvin, 86, of Cinnaminson, a former social worker who retired as an information specialist at Fox Chase Cancer Center in 1998, died Monday, Jan. 12, at home following a stroke. Mrs. Marvin worked, among others, for St. Christopher's Hospital for Children and the North City Congress in Philadelphia, a son, Charles, said. The website for the congress states in part that its role is "to support older adults to remain living at home with independence. " Mrs. Marvin grew up in Beach Haven, N.J., graduated from Barnegat High School in 1946, and earned an associate's degree in arts at George Washington University in 1949 and a bachelor's in psychology at Rutgers-Camden in 1973.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's firefighters have been awarded a four-year contract that increases salaries about 9.5 percent over the life of the agreement. The new contract with the Philadelphia Fire Fighters' and Paramedics Union, Local 22 of the International Association of Fire Fighters, was reached through arbitration Friday morning and will cost the city about $70 million, Mayor Nutter said. The contract also contains changes in how the union's health-care costs are managed that should result in long-term savings for the city, Nutter said.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chief financial officers typically have a solid grasp of costs and how to cut them. It's their job. "Yet when it comes to health care, they leave that at the door," said Stephen P. Kelly, president of ELAP Services, a Chester Springs company with a painstaking approach to cutting hospital bills for self-insured employers. Instead of paying premiums to an insurance company, which then pays medical bills, self-insured employers set aside money to pay the bills themselves through a third-party administrator.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Health-care stocks secured five of the top 10 spots in a ranking of 2014 stock-market performance by members of The Inquirer's Philly50, the list of the most valuable publicly traded companies in the region. It was a strong year overall. Only eight of the 50 stocks saw their values decline last year. Half the decliners were in chemicals and manufacturing, led by a 24 percent drop in the share price of FMC Corp., which had a tumultuous year, announcing and then dropping a plan to split into two companies.
NEWS
January 4, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Christine Bergstresser has read the Affordable Care Act. OK, not all 11,588,500 words. But more of the law than most people, including - probably - some elected officials in Washington. "I have read the majority of it," says Bergstresser, 43, a certified application counselor. "Some of it you can really kind of skim through. " Certified application counselors help people enroll in Obamacare. Bergstresser volunteers for Enroll America, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization whose goal is to get Americans covered by health insurance.
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