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Health Care Bill

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NEWS
November 19, 1992 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The Senate unexpectedly put off a vote yesterday on a children's health- care bill that had been considered a "done deal," inciting charges by Democrats that majority Republicans were holding the measure hostage in exchange for favorable action on other issues. Only a night earlier, a top GOP Senate official said the bill had "very strong support" and he predicted passage. Republicans, Democrats and administration officials reached a final agreement on the measure Tuesday after months of negotiations.
NEWS
November 10, 2009
WHEN 219 Democrats - and one Republican - passed the Affordable Health Care for Americans Act just before midnight on Saturday, there was loud cheering and extended applause in the House of Representatives. It was deserved. In 60-plus years of talking about it, a bill aimed at providing universal health insurance had passed a house of Congress. It was an historic victory. So why did the celebration feel so hollow? What should have been a sweet victory was soured by the razor-thin margin of the House bill's passage.
NEWS
October 18, 2009 | By E.J. Dionne
The fate of the health- care bill is largely in the hands of Barack Obama and Olympia Snowe. The Finance Committee's vote Tuesday to send its bill to the Senate floor vindicated President Obama's strategy of giving Congress wide latitude to write the early drafts. Major health reform has advanced further than it ever has before. But Obama must now abandon his preference for intervening forcefully only after House and Senate bills go to a conference committee. Instead, he needs to focus on the core goals of insuring as many people as possible and expanding, rather than contracting, the choices Americans will have under a new system.
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Republican lawmakers broadened their attack on the Senate Democratic health-care bill yesterday, charging that it was more bureaucratic and complex than President Clinton's original legislation. And a study by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office indicated that some of the GOP criticism might be warranted. The CBO questioned whether the Senate bill could work as designed. "There is a significant chance that the substantial changes required by this proposal . . . could not be achieved as assumed," the report said.
NEWS
December 30, 2009
RE ELMER Smith's recent column on health-care reform: I admire Elmer, but I totally disagree on this blunderbuss of a bill. It's bad for me personally, for fellow city workers and fellow Pennsylvanians. So bad that the president of AFSCME, Gerald McEntee, is against it. Last year, I earned $40,000. This year, $35,000. I'm making less but because Harry Reid and his Democrats think I have a "Cadillac" health plan, we city workers will have to pay tax on our plan, and that's not fair (especially since "Little Caesar" wants to give us the shaft on a new contract)
NEWS
June 8, 1996 | By R.A. Zaldivar and David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A bill that would limit insurers' power to deny medical coverage to people with health problems is in deep trouble, and its Democratic cosponsor says health-care reform may be doomed this year. Although both the House and Senate have passed versions of the bill, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D., Mass.) said yesterday that GOP insistence on a new tax break for medical savings accounts (MSAs) has created an impasse. "It appears that the opportunity for meaningful reform has been lost again," Kennedy said at a hastily called news conference.
NEWS
May 21, 1994 | By R.A. Zaldivar, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Gays and lesbians could win significant safeguards against discrimination under Democratic health-care reform bills being considered in Congress. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D., Mass.), and Rep. Pete Stark (D., Calif.), have added provisions to their bills that would specifically forbid discrimination on the basis of "sexual orientation. " But Republican objections could make the issue another flash point in the health-care reform debate. Current federal laws against discrimination do not explicitly protect homosexuals from bias, said Donald Livingston, a Washington lawyer who until recently was the chief legal officer for the government's Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | By Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Except for being six months late, President Clinton's 1,336-page health- care reform bill is remarkably close to what he promised in just four pages during the 1992 election campaign. The major differences between then and now are financial. As a candidate, Clinton never talked about cutting the growth of Medicare or Medicaid, as he now proposes to help pay for health-care reform. In fact, he criticized then-President George Bush, Democrat Paul Tsongas and independent Ross Perot for suggesting Medicare cuts.
NEWS
June 10, 1994 | By R.A. Zaldivar and Brenda Rios, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The first of five key congressional panels considering health-care reform approved a bill yesterday that meets President Clinton's goal of insurance coverage for every American. But Republicans predicted that the Senate Labor Committee plan would not survive on the Senate floor, and other committees faced a struggle to finish their bills by the latest target of early July. Congress remains nowhere near a bill that could command a majority in both houses. A compromise has yet to emerge that could pull moderate Republicans along, or lock in the votes of conservative Democrats.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2010 | By Stacey Burling and Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Is health reform dead - again? Joseph Reichman, president of the Medical Society of New Jersey, says he thinks it is, and that's OK with him. "I look at this as derailing the president's plans," he said of Tuesday's election in Massachusetts, which filled the late Ted Kennedy's Senate seat with Republican Scott Brown. That will make it much harder for Democrats to pass bills in the Senate without Republican support, and Republican support for the current bills has been nearly nonexistent.
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NEWS
January 27, 2013 | By Thomas Beaumont, Associated Press
CUMMING, Iowa - U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin said Saturday he would not seek a sixth term in 2014, a decision that eases some of the burden the national Republican Party faces in retaking the Senate. Harkin, chairman of an influential Senate committee, announced his decision during an interview with the Associated Press, and said the move could surprise some. But the 73-year-old cited his age - he would be 81 at the end of a sixth term - as a factor in the decision, saying it was time to pass the torch he has held for nearly 30 years, freeing a new generation of Iowa Democrats to seek higher office.
NEWS
December 8, 2012 | By Angela Delli Santi, Associated Press
TRENTON - Gov. Christie on Thursday vetoed legislation establishing a state-run health-insurance exchange, saying the federal government had failed to provide the answers he needed to make a fiscally sound decision on the best way to comply with the Affordable Care Act. The governor said he had not eliminated any of the options available to states to comply with the national health-care overhaul. But he said it would be irresponsible to choose one over the others without knowing the costs of each.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - New Jersey lawmakers will set aside $1 million to help school districts implement an anti-bullying law passed last year, a fix worked out by Republican Gov. Christie and Democrats after a state panel in January declared the law an unfunded mandate. The bill, approved by both chambers Thursday, now heads to Christie's desk. In their final voting session before they hunker down to work on the state budget, both Democratic- led chambers also passed a bill that would allow individuals and small businesses to shop online for health-care plans - a measure written to adhere to the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Also, local residents would have the final say on whether a charter school could open in their community under a bill passed by the Assembly on Thursday.
NEWS
January 19, 2012
ON FEB. 1, the cost of my single-coverage health care will go up 16.4 percent. Last year at this time, it rose 19.7 percent. So, in two years, my monthly premium has increased $208, and I'll now be paying $734 per month - which means that health care will cost me more than rent. As an independent contractor, I don't receive health benefits (or benefits of any kind), but facing a monthly payment of $734, I'm considering going out and independently contracting tuberculosis so that I'll feel like my money isn't being wasted.
NEWS
December 12, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Francis "Frank" A. Zampiello, 75, of Philadelphia, an early advocate for better health care through his work with the U.S. Public Health Service, died Thursday, Dec. 1, at home of complications from autoimmune liver disease. Before retiring, Dr. Zampiello was national director of the Quality Center in the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration Bureau of Primary Health Care, where he served from 1997 until 2002. In that role, he worked to reduce errors and increase efficiency in the nation's health-care delivery.
NEWS
July 17, 2011 | By Noam N. Levey, Tribune Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The debate over the federal deficit has pumped new life into controversial proposals for requiring Americans on Medicare to pay more for their health care, raising the possibility that seniors' medical bills could jump hundreds, or even thousands, of dollars. It remains unclear whether any of the proposals, which congressional Republicans have demanded in order to cut trillions of dollars from the federal budget, will be enacted this year, given the continued stalemate over government spending.
NEWS
June 21, 2011 | By Maya Rao and Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - In the battle over benefits, Team South Jersey is dragging the most controversial bill in recent Statehouse history over the finish line. By joining with the GOP minority, the New Jersey Senate's southern Democrats bucked the majority of their party and unions to supply six key votes to pass legislation requiring government workers to pay more for their pensions and health care. Even State Sen. James Whelan of Atlantic County, who faces a competitive election in November, supported it. Even State Sen. Donald Norcross of Camden County, president of the Southern New Jersey AFL-CIO Labor Council, voted yes. Senate President Stephen Sweeney, a Gloucester County Democrat who was the architect of the bill, rounded up enough supporters to eke out a victory.
NEWS
June 20, 2011 | By Maya Rao, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Undaunted by hundreds of labor leaders protesting outside the Statehouse, eight Democrats in the New Jersey Senate supplied the votes needed to pass a historic bill today that would require public workers to pay more for their health and pension benefits. The measure passed 24-15 with the support of the entire South Jersey delegation and GOP minority. Supplying the yes votes were James Beach and Donald Norcross of Camden County; sponsor and Senate President Stephen Sweeney and Fred Madden of Gloucester County; Jeff Van Drew of Cape May County; Jim Whelan of Atlantic County; and Teresa Ruiz of Essex County; and Brian Stack of Hudson County.
NEWS
June 16, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A full-blown war has broken out in Gov. Christie's Trenton, with Democratic Party leaders openly feuding with the teachers' union, one of their traditional sources of support and money. The New Jersey Education Association, the state's largest teachers' union and most powerful lobby, released a television ad Wednesday that blasted a bill that could double the amount the typical teacher pays for pension and health benefits. The ad, to be shown on stations in New York and Philadelphia, takes aim at the highest elected Democrat in the state, Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
January 19, 2011 | By WILL BUNCH, bunchw@phillynews.com 215-854-2957
It seems like only yesterday that Ke$ha was the queen of the pop-music charts, the New Orleans Saints were the kings of pro football - and Washington was locked in a heated debate over what to do about health care in America. OK, actually it was only this time last year. But now as the 112th Congress kicks off 2011, it's deja vu all over again as Republicans - retaking the House and cutting into the Democratic majority in the Senate - restart the debate, already pushing to repeal the massive health-care overhaul that President Obama signed into law last March.
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