CollectionsHealth Care Fraud
IN THE NEWS

Health Care Fraud

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 18, 2011 | Associated Press
The federal government is gaining ground in the battle against people who commit health-care fraud, recovering nearly $8 billion dollars over the past two years, Attorney General Eric Holder told a health-care forum yesterday in Philadelphia. He said that of that amount - recovered in judgments, settlements, fines, restitutions and forfeitures - about a quarter of it has been collected in the Philadelphia area. Holder and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius addressed a summit on health-care fraud at the University of the Sciences as part of a series the government is holding nationwide.
NEWS
January 23, 2012
The United States spends about $2.6 trillion per year on health care, or about 17.4 percent of our gross domestic product - more than most developed nations without correspondingly good results. The Justice Department has increased prosecution of health-care fraud, which can physically harm patients and fiscally injure taxpayers, against individuals or multinational companies. Philadelphia is a center for that fight because there are many health-care companies in the area.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
A Philadelphia man pleaded guilty to submitting $1.5 million worth of claims for chiropractic treatments to Independence Blue Cross, Zane David Memeger. U.S. Attorney in Philadelphia, said. Prosecutors said that in 2009, Tahib Smith Ali, 35, posed as a chiropractor and physical therapist while operating a Philadelphia clinic known as Oasis Holistic Healing Village on South 17th Street in Center City and submitted claims under the name and medical provider number who no longer worked at the clinic.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Zane David Memeger marked the end of his first year as U.S. attorney for Eastern Pennsylvania by gathering 67 people Friday to discuss how to combat health-care fraud. Attendees came from the federal government, but also from state and local agencies. Health-care companies and insurers had members on hand for the event in Philadelphia. "Health-care costs continue to rise as the public demands more health care," Memeger said. "While most health-care providers play by the rules, the reality is that more taxpayer dollars are lost each year to abuse.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
A SUMMERDALE MAN who posed as a chiropractor and a physical therapist and treated patients as part of an elaborate health-care fraud scheme was sentenced to six years in federal prison Thursday. Tahib Smith Ali, 35, is to surrender to the Bureau of Prisons as soon as he gets a report date, U.S. District Judge Mitchell Goldberg said. The judge also ordered Ali to make restitution of $287,972, which includes co-pays that Ali allegedly charged to 86 patients. Ali, who was not licensed and had no medical training, purchased the Oasis Holistic Healing Village, on 17th Street near Spruce, in December 2008 from Dr. Paul Bodhise, a licensed chiropractor who was retiring and moving to California.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an era when pharmaceutical executives - like their brethren in banking - are under fire for paying fines too often instead of going to prison to settle allegations of wrongdoing, health care fraud investigations returned $4.2 billion to the nation's coffers last year, the U.S. government said Monday. For every $1 spent on investigations, the government got back $7.90 over the last three years, which is $2.50 higher than the rolling three-year average since the Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program began in 1997, according to a joint report released by the Department of Justice and Department of Health and Human Services.
NEWS
August 31, 2011 | By Mark Taylor, For The Inquirer
Though he can explain it in calm, rational terms, James Sheehan said it still feels odd to be unemployed after 31 years of public service. In July, Sheehan, 59, arguably the nation's best known prosecutor of health-care fraud and the longtime former civil-division chief with the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia, was asked by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to resign his most recent position as New York Medicaid Inspector General. As he did in Philadelphia, Sheehan created headlines in New York with highly publicized probes and settlements, recovering more than $1.2 billion in improper Medicaid payments in his four years there and avoiding paying $2 billion more.
NEWS
July 28, 2012 | By Mark S. Smith and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration is upping the ante in the fight against health-care fraud, joining forces with private insurers and state investigators on a scale not previously seen in an attempt to stanch tens of billions of dollars in losses. Announcing the new public-private partnership Thursday, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said it "puts criminals on notice that we will find them and stop them. " Fraud is an endemic problem plaguing entitlement programs like Medicare and Medicaid as well as private insurance companies.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2007 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a former prosecutor and in-house lawyer for two sprawling pharmaceutical companies, Valli Baldassano has looked at health-care fraud from both sides now, from win and lose, and still somehow. . . . Well, you get the idea. Baldassano has a unique vantage point, having seen both the inside of government fraud investigations and the fumbling moves of pharmaceutical companies to avoid indictment. Bottom line: The health-care and white-collar defense lawyer for Fox Rothschild L.L.P.
NEWS
August 6, 2016 | William Bender and Chris Palmer, STAFF WRITERS
Gambling, loan-sharking, gun trafficking, and ... skin-cream fraud? Reputed Philadelphia mob boss Joey Merlino was arrested in Florida on Thursday as part of a sweeping East Coast mob takedown that snared dozens of well-monikered alleged gangsters. "Mustache Pat," "Nicky the Wig," "Muscles," "Anthony the Kid," "Patty Boy," "Tony the Cripple," "Tugboat," "Fish," and "Rooster" were among the 46 alleged La Cosa Nostra members, leaders and associates named in the federal racketeering indictment announced by the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 6, 2016 | William Bender and Chris Palmer, STAFF WRITERS
Gambling, loan-sharking, gun trafficking, and ... skin-cream fraud? Reputed Philadelphia mob boss Joey Merlino was arrested in Florida on Thursday as part of a sweeping East Coast mob takedown that snared dozens of well-monikered alleged gangsters. "Mustache Pat," "Nicky the Wig," "Muscles," "Anthony the Kid," "Patty Boy," "Tony the Cripple," "Tugboat," "Fish," and "Rooster" were among the 46 alleged La Cosa Nostra members, leaders and associates named in the federal racketeering indictment announced by the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York.
NEWS
February 16, 2016
ISSUE | HEALTH CARE Protect professionals By a vote of 177-0, Pennsylvania's House of Representatives sent a message Wednesday that more can be done to protect the state's health-care workers from assault during the performance of their jobs. House Bill 1219 adds health-care professionals to a protected class of individuals in cases of assault. Sponsored by Rep. Judy Ward (R., Blair), the bill raises the penalty from a second-degree misdemeanor to a felony. Nearly 60 percent of nonfatal assaults and violent acts occur in the health-care and social-assistance industry.
NEWS
February 11, 2016
A federal jury convicted a registered nurse on four counts of health care fraud Monday in a case in which prosecutors alleged she aided her employer in a plan to bilk Medicare out of more than $9 million. Between 2005 and 2008, Patricia McGill, 68, served as the former director of professional services of Home Care Hospice, the Bustleton facility that prosecutors alleged enrolled dozens of patients who did not meet federal guidelines for hospice care. In addition, the government accused McGill, under the watch of the facility's owners, of overseeing the falsification of records to suggest patients were sicker than they were or received treatments that were never given.
NEWS
November 20, 2015
A story Thursday on a new discount program for E-ZPass customers crossing Delaware River Port Authority bridges gave the wrong launch date. The program starts Dec. 1. A story Wednesday about a doctor accused of health-care fraud misstated the status of Lower Bucks Hospital in Bristol. It emerged from bankruptcy in 2012 and is operating under new management.
NEWS
February 22, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Have you witnessed something illegal, unethical, or potentially fraudulent where you work? If you rat out corporate bad behavior, you could win millions. Last year, for example, Edward O'Donnell, a former Countrywide Financial executive, won $58 million from parent company Bank of America in a case stemming from the sale of shoddy mortgages. His award was part of a record $435 million the U.S. government paid in whistleblower awards, mostly related to health-care fraud and cases involving banks and mortgage companies.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
After indicting nine Philadelphia-area ambulance company owners and their employees for Medicare fraud since 2011, the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia on Thursday, for the first time, charged passengers with fraud for accepting kickbacks. The 30-page indictment alleges that four Medicare beneficiaries received payments of up to $500 a month for riding in ambulances operated by Brotherly Love Ambulance Inc. of Philadelphia. The usual model of ambulance fraud in Philadelphia involves transporting dialysis patients, who actually can travel safely by less-expensive means.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anna Mudrova, 41, of Huntingdon Valley, received an eight-year prison term for her role in a Medicare fraud involving Penn Choice Ambulance Inc., which operated from Huntingdon Valley Camp Hill, Pa. Mudrova's scheme involved more than $3.6 million in fraudulent Medicare claims, according to the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Mudrova and other defendants who worked for Penn Choice falsified reports to make it seem like patients needed ambulance transport when they didn't.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A VETERAN federal prosecutor passionately told a judge yesterday that Alex Pugman, a leading defendant in a Medicare fraud case, "was without a doubt the most exceptional cooperator I have worked with. " Pugman, who was the director and co-owner of the now-defunct Home Care Hospice in Northeast Philly, helped explain the roles of other participants in the scheme, pointed out the fraud in the agency's records, and testified at two grand juries and at three trials, Assistant U.S. Attorney Suzanne Ercole said.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Pease helped lead health-care fraud investigations - as well as sending former Pennsylvania State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo to prison - before leaving the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia in January 2013. Now, as senior counsel at Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Pease will be on the other side of a health-care legal fight. Teva said Monday, in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing, that it was under investigation by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Manhattan over sales practices related to its best-selling drug, Copaxone.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
NEWARK, N.J. - A North Jersey cardiologist has admitted taking part in a scheme that subjected thousands of patients to unnecessary tests and treatment and resulted in $19 million in bogus bills, authorities said. Jose Katz, 68, of Closter, pleaded guilty Wednesday in federal court to conspiracy to commit health-care fraud and an unrelated count of Social Security fraud for giving his wife a years-long no-show job, making her eligible for Social Security. Katz, 68, was the founder and chief executive of Cardio-Med Services L.L.C., which had offices in Union City, Paterson, and West New York, and Comprehensive Healthcare & Medical Services, which had offices in Manhattan and Queens, N.Y. Katz, who is free on bail, is scheduled to be sentenced July 23. The health-care fraud charge carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|