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NEWS
July 9, 2008
ALL OF us can agree on a few basic tenets of health-care reform. We want improved access to care, not just in the form of reducing the number of uninsured in the commonwealth, but also by having the medical capacity to care for everyone who needs health care services. We also want a system that can provide the highest quality of care at the lowest price. As CEO of Greater Philadelphia Health Action, I know that community health centers are part of the health care solution.
NEWS
June 9, 1999 | By David Woods
The University of Pennsylvania Health System, hemorrhaging $90 million in operating losses last year, has announced that it will eliminate more than 1,000 jobs, and the hunt for the usual suspects will be on with a vengeance. Most of them are innocent. Some point the finger at what they perceive as greedy and uncaring health maintenance organizations (HMOs), yet the median profit for HMOs has declined from 2.1 percent in 1990 to a median loss of 1.2 percent in 1998. The original HMO, Kaiser-Permanente, lost a whopping $288 million last year.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly four million people in Pennsylvania and New Jersey - about one-fifth of the population - live in households that will spend more than 10 percent of their pretax income on health care this year, according to new reports from Families USA, a Washington health-advocacy group. In a report released yesterday, the group said 2.3 million Pennsylvanians under age 65 - 22 percent - are in households that will spend more than 10 percent on health care. That is up from 1.9 million in 2000.
NEWS
December 7, 1993 | BY VICTORIA A. BROWNWORTH
Health care. After the economy, it's the primary concern of most Americans. But according to the U.S. Public Health Service, most of us are getting inadequate health care and many of us are getting no health care at all. That has put a lot of us at risk. Heart disease is up. Cancer statistics for women have skyrocketed. AIDS now affects every segment of the population and is the leading cause of death in several American cities. Nearly 30 percent of U.S. children aren't vaccinated against diseases that children in some of the world's poorest nation's are protected against.
NEWS
March 22, 2010
MARY CELLUCCI'S cursory letter on health care (March 16) ignores Sen. Arlen Specter's career-long support for comprehensive health care and his recognized leadership in directing support to medical and scientific research. As former chairman and ranking member of the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services and Education, Sen. Specter has worked to ensure Medicare patients access to top quality health-care services and affordable prescription drugs.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | Robert W. Patterson is editor of the public-policy journal the Family in America
Now that the Supreme Court has decreed that President Obama can impose his massive health-care plan on the American people, the Republicans believe that the controversial Affordable Care Act will help them come November, just as it did in the 2010 elections. Mitt Romney has promised to act to repeal all 2,801 pages of the president's signature initiative during his first day in the Oval Office. Moreover, conservative policy wonks are offering commonsense health-care reforms that would shift power from the federal government to the states, private markets, and patients.
NEWS
July 21, 1994 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the most important policy debates in America this century has Americans dazed and confused. The issue, you may have guessed, is health-care reform. "I have worked on these issues for about 20 years and my circuits are just in overload," says Gail Shearer, a health policy analyst for Consumers Union. "It is very confusing to me. If the average consumer is confused, it wouldn't be surprising. " And yesterday, with President Clinton declaring he'd been misinterpreted on what universal coverage means, didn't help any. Maggie Hyland, a Philadelphia legal secretary interviewed last week as she finished her lunch at the Reading Terminal Market, has tried to keep track of the health-care proposals.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | BY MIKE ROYKO
The White House has brought in a new health-care czar. It is his job to pull everything together and get the Clintons' revolutionary plan turned into law. I have to admit the new health plan boss - Harold M. Ickes - has perfect credentials for the job. First of all, he is a lawyer. Of course. Just about everyone involved in rebuilding the nation's medical world is a lawyer. Around the White House, if you don't know how to write a writ, you are considered a barbarian. And what does health czar Ickes know about health care?
NEWS
September 25, 1995 | By Leroy L. Schwartz
The devolution of welfare from the federal government to the states in the form of block grants can only work if suitable jobs are available. The health-care system, the largest employer in the country - providing a living for an estimated 10 percent of American workers - could and should provide many of them. Significantly, health care is a big source of minority employment in many parts of the country. Nationally, from 1987 to 1992, health care accounted for 53 percent of job gains by blacks and 44 percent by women.
NEWS
June 12, 2003 | By LYNN YEAKEL
WHEN Bob Hope reached his 100th birthday in late May, an avalanche of articles and TV features began to focus on the "How do you get to be 100?" question. The occasion also triggered debate over the longevity-vs.-quality-of-life debate. Is the goal just to extend the span of years, or should health care be heavily tilted toward how well we feel for however many years we have? Some will say the goals aren't in conflict. Others disagree, and will make their case by saying our focus is more on "illness care" than on health care.
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