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Health Care

BUSINESS
April 6, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
  For all its size and strength in South Jersey, Virtua Health remains a community health system, leaving complicated care it does not do itself to partners and competitors. But the nonprofit system, which had more than $1 billion in revenue last year, is showing signs of broader aspirations. Virtua drew attention to itself as an economic driver in South Jersey on Thursday, holding a meeting at its new Voorhees medical complex on "how health care is boosting the regional economy and beyond.
NEWS
July 14, 1991 | By MICHAEL KINSLEY
Health-care costs are bankrupting the nation, and 34 million Americans have no health insurance at all. Why? Because "today's basic system evolved not in response to the needs of consumers, but according to the marketing and professional objectives of suppliers of health care. " Who says so? Ralph Nader? Long-Haired Physicians for Socialized Medicine? No, it's the Heritage Foundation, of all people. Washington's leading right-wing think tank has produced a remarkably progressive idea for health-care reform.
NEWS
September 2, 1994
Health reform? Baloney, health rip-off is more like it. You will pay $2,000 to $5,000 a year so you can stay healthy. The administration wants to build a fund like Social Security so they can raid it for pork-barrel projects. They don't care about your health, they are interested only in what you pay the rest of your life. Health insurance is at home. Eat right, walk, save your money. If you need it, then buy it. In November, vote. You've been keeping them in, now vote them out. JOSEPH PINO Swedesboro, N.J. During the House and Senate debates on health-care reform, the Democratic members put on a Hollywood show of holding up their health-care cards, and advocated that all Americans should be entitled to the same health-care plan they enjoy.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2012 | By Mark Jewell, Associated Press
BOSTON — Couples retiring this year can expect their medical bills throughout retirement to cost 4 percent more than those who retired a year ago, according to an annual projection released this month by Fidelity Investments. The estimated $240,000 that a newly retired couple will need to cover health-care expenses reflects the typical pattern of projected annual increases. The Boston-based company cut the estimate for the first time last year, citing President Obama's health-care overhaul.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | By R.A. Zaldivar, Inquirer Washington Bureau
When it comes to health care, Joan Tumpson has put her money where her heart is. The Miami lawyer was shocked by the story of a woman who was refused surgery to remove a uterine tumor at a public hospital because she didn't have a $200 deposit. Tumpson quickly sent in a donation. Tumpson believes it's time to change the health-care system, but she's not sure if raising taxes is the way to guarantee care for the uninsured. "Higher taxes are difficult," she said. Her ambivalence illustrates the dilemma facing health-care reformers: Most Americans want the system changed, but polls show resistance to tax increases or restrictions on access to health care.
NEWS
June 25, 2008
Republican leaders in the Pennsylvania Senate - fully insured for their medical needs - can breathe a sigh of relief. Their eleventh-hour patchwork of health-care proposals has had the desired effect: It's a sedative, not a cure. As a result, Gov. Rendell is no longer talking about stronger medicine. For the senators, the immediate political risk has passed for now. That means Senate Majority Leader Dominic F. Pileggi (R., Chester) and his colleagues won't have to take any courageous steps any time soon to come to the aid of the state's nearly 800,000 adults without health insurance.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | Staff and wire reports
THE SUPREME COURT will rule Thursday on whether President Obama's signature national health-care law is constitutional. The decision of the nine justices will have huge ripple effects for health care across the country, including here in Philadelphia and around the state. An estimated 1.37 million Pennsylvania residents — about 11 percent — are uninsured. Republican Gov. Tom Corbett, as state attorney general in 2010, joined a group of state officials in challenging the law. Still, Pennsylvania is working to set up a health-insurance exchange required by the law, although the state Insurance Department says that it is waiting for the Supreme Court's decision before it touches a $33 million grant it won in January to build out the exchange.
NEWS
April 23, 2006
On that clear, distant morning when every American has access to high-quality, affordable medical care, the nation's health care system may be the polar opposite of what it is today. Where now, patients see doctors thanks to a moth-eaten patchwork that includes work-based coverage, government programs and charity care in emergency departments, tomorrow they may receive treatment by one, and only one, means. It could be a Medicare-for-all system that looks like other Western nations' government-run, taxpayer-funded health plans.
NEWS
October 9, 2002 | By Clea Benson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The City of Philadelphia has awarded a new $36 million contract for health care in its jails to the same firm it got rid of in June amid questions about the quality of care and inmate deaths. After a hearing yesterday, City Councilman Angel Ortiz criticized the Street administration for awarding the nine-month contract to Prison Health Services without running the agreement before City Council. The firm, which has provided prison health care here since 1996, won the contract even though it did not submit a bid, as did two other health-care companies.
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